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Are Shoe Trees Important - Page 2

post #16 of 115
Sheepie I would like to register my disagreement with Ed Morel. That is one of the best posts I have ever seen on SF!
post #17 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by acridsheep View Post


Welcome. For your edification:
576


"Wife leaves noob for fireman" seems a bit "subjective"  on the Happiness scale :)

 

I've always wondering why $500+ shoes don't come with complimentary trees?!? You would think if they were so important:

a). The manufacturer would offer them as part of the package, just like they sell the shoe with the lace for free.

b). The shoes would be kept in the box with the complimentary trees inserted. I can imagine that very expensive shoes in odd sizes take quite a while to sell.

 

post #18 of 115
jeezaweez. buy shoe trees. its that simple. smile.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gdot View Post

And in that price range you should spend the change for lasted trees that match the shoes.

also this
post #19 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ianiceman View Post

Sheepie I would like to register my disagreement with Ed Morel. That is one of the best posts I have ever seen on SF!

Thank you. Ed has seen the light and joined the flock. We all make mistakes.
post #20 of 115
Why do trees look like this...

tumblr_lowvq1GYBF1qfbdo0o1_400.jpg

...instead of this...

foot8lg.jpg

...with a fabric layer like this...

organic____1179_medium.jpg

...so that a shoe "tree" would look like this?

copper-socks-mens-dress-casual.jpg

?
post #21 of 115
263
post #22 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

Why do trees look like this...
tumblr_lowvq1GYBF1qfbdo0o1_400.jpg
...instead of this...
foot8lg.jpg
...with a fabric layer like this...
organic____1179_medium.jpg
...so that a shoe "tree" would look like this?
copper-socks-mens-dress-casual.jpg
?

would you like to join me in a business venture. i need some capital.
post #23 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

would you like to join me in a business venture. i need some capital.

It seems to me that the perfect way to store clothes and shoes would be to have multitude of mannequins...

billrb.jpg

...exactly in one's size and dimensions. So, you know, you take off your clothes and shoes, and put them on the mannequin, on which they retain perfect shape.

Someone unfamiliar with Qin Shi Huang will probably say something like, "Oh, that would take too much terracotta, blah blah blah," but it can be done. Failing that, if space is a factor, why not just the feet? For such feet would be smaller in outline than the shoes, and so, take up no more space.

confused.gif
post #24 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post


...so that a shoe "tree" would look like this?
copper-socks-mens-dress-casual.jpg
?

Obviously those are SOCK trees! That's a whole different thread.
post #25 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrTKN View Post

First post! I have read a lot of interesting posts on this forum and as a result I feel like a fundi of sorts compared to the layman on the street. I know there are a lot of posts on shoe trees but I was wondering...Are they really important? I recently purchased a pair of Magnanni and To Boot New York shoes for my corporate wardrobe and in attempting to ensure I keep my shoes in top notch I stumbled upon this forum. (Needless to say, I feel rather amateurish having bought those two brands to start with as they don't seem to be highly regarded). 

Ok, enough on the background. First point, most people on SF agree that shoe trees mostly act as catalysts for moisture absorption and only absorb a little moisture themselves. Secondly, most members agree that shoe trees will lessen the appearance of wrinkles but they will not prevent or eliminate them. However, I have looked at a few pics that show older C&J, Church, AE, AS shoes etc with shoe trees and I do not imagine they could look any worse if they never had shoe trees. Here is my reasoning;  If you start of with a good pair of shoes, say a pair of C&J (or insert your favourite here) having the highest quality leather and the best construction (Goodyear welt??) might it not be possible that those shoes would look good after many years regardless of whether or not they had shoe trees? Otherwise why pay a premium for those shoes if the difference in durability with cheaper shoes comes down to using a pair of shoe trees? Might shoe trees be the answer to a problem that never existed? What I contend is the case here is that people that can pay $400 on a pair of shoes will also be readily willing to pay an extra 30 bucks for a pair of shoe trees to 'protect' their investment without paying due consideration to the actual benefits that you derive from the additional purchase.

I also suppose that shoe trees have had advocates since time immemorial but no one ever stopped to question their importance. Is there anyone on SF that has a pair of shoes eg AE, Alden, Church etc that never used shoe trees and regrets that decision? Or anyone with a bad looking pair of reputable shoes who also believes those shoes look so bad due to not having shoe trees for all or part of their lives. Or anyone that has bought a 'shoe tree free' pair from ebay who can testify that shoe trees are really important. Would love to see pics. Otherwise I believe if you have a pair of MTO John Lobbs, your shoes will look good after 10  years even without shoe trees because 1) You don't wear them often 2) They have the best leather for uppers and sole 3) You give them a good polish and conditioning every now and then 4) When you wear them you do not walk for miles and miles in them. 5) You change your gait ever so slightly to ensure you don't wear them out too quickly  (and a few other points I can't think of right now) but lo and behold..you attribute their 'good looking' state to shoe trees? Really? If anyone disagrees please feel free to enlighten me with pictorial evidence and some testimonies. Otherwise I will try to post pics of my not so high quality dress boots that have never seen a shoe tree in their life... and still look good, then again they are only a year old..

I know this is rather long; last point. Since shoes and indeed feet all have different sizes, I consider that shoe trees that are not identical to the last used to create the shoe or the owner's foot would add little or no substantial benefit to the shoe. I think people do themselves a great disservice by buying shoe trees that are in no way identical to their own feet. I think other SF members agree that if shoe trees are too big they will stretch the shoe. If they are too small they wouldn't reduce wrinkling. It's hard enough getting pair of shoes that fits and probably harder to get a pair of shoe trees that conform to the fit of your shoes unless your shoe trees come from the manufacturer of the shoe. 



thats a lot of text describing a shade of gray

if you dont think you need 30$ trees, dont buy them
post #26 of 115

You could make custom made shoe trees using the customer's foot for the mold. Seems like the ideal solution. Make it happen.

post #27 of 115
CVS tape rolled into balls and shoved into shoes also makes a great shoe tree.
post #28 of 115
^^^Newspaper stuffed in the shoes works, too. It's often what I use when I travel.
post #29 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonnyt View Post

I started using trees about three years ago. Till that point, all my shoes looked quite creased, had curled soles and some cracking in the sole around the ball of my feet. Since using trees, I don't have any of these issues. Some of the shoes have almost no creasing despite wearing every week.

Pretty much the same experience. If you look at shoes at a thrift store, many that are low quality to begin with and haven't been used with shoe trees ever, you'll see that they've basically collapsed. They've lost the shape of the shoe and while you can put them back on, you'll have shoes that are full of wrinkles, creased, cracks and whatnot. No, shoe trees are not a necessity, but they're a small investment for keeping your shoes in good condition longer.

I've also had one pair of shoes stretched a bit to fit my feet better and the shoe trees will help keep them that way.

Oh and the reason why shoe trees look like they do is:
  1. They don't need to look like real feet. They're meant to fit the inside of the shoe, which is not exactly like your feet unless you're into that nasty Chinese foot binding thing.
  2. They don't have socks because the wood is enough to wick moisture away. If they had socks you'd need to change them from time to time whereas the wood will dry on its own better. Plus the cedar wood gives a nice scent.
post #30 of 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

It seems to me that the perfect way to store clothes and shoes would be to have multitude of mannequins...
billrb.jpg
...exactly in one's size and dimensions. So, you know, you take off your clothes and shoes, and put them on the mannequin, on which they retain perfect shape.
Someone unfamiliar with Qin Shi Huang will probably say something like, "Oh, that would take too much terracotta, blah blah blah," but it can be done. Failing that, if space is a factor, why not just the feet? For such feet would be smaller in outline than the shoes, and so, take up no more space.
confused.gif

Perhaps they could be deployed round town as full size SF spokesmodels when one is not wearing said ensemble. Thus gaining double duty from one's clothing investment. What say you Reev?
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