or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › The Official Pipe, Pipe Tobacco, Accessories, and Smoking Thread.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Official Pipe, Pipe Tobacco, Accessories, and Smoking Thread. - Page 6

post #76 of 146
I have added margate to my tobacco's. I like it quite a bit.
post #77 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by countdemoney View Post

I have added margate to my tobacco's. I like it quite a bit.

I am a fan. In fact there are several Esoterica blends that I like. If you like Margate, you might also like Pembroke which is very similar but with a very light Cognac topping.
My singular favorite tobacco, also by Esoterica but nothing like Margate is Stonehaven - at least for the moment.
post #78 of 146
It's nice to hear you enjoy Stonehaven and give it high marks. When I looked up Margate after trying it, the site showed Stonehaven as having many reviews and an average 5 out of 5 rating. Between that and your rec, it's definitely on my list to try next..
post #79 of 146
I just got my first pipe. This is also the first time I've ever smoked tobacco.

I wanted to handle and smell everything before I made my purchase, so I went to a store instead of ordering anything online. I was not planning on spending very much money since I wasn't sure if I would enjoy it. I walked away with Captain Black tobacco on the recommendation of the shop owner. I have since learned that this is a cheap drugstore brand. I got the white pouch since he said that was the lightest, and also the cherry.

I've only had the white so far. As a kid and teen I always refused to smoke, so felt a little guilty as I took my first ever puff. The taste was unbelievably light. In fact, I could scarcely tell if there was any smoke inside of my mouth at all until I exhaled. The aftertaste in my mouth is pleasant. I know that most pipe smokers do not inhale the smoke. I tried it once and it burned my throat. Smoking was relaxing, but I don't think it's as relaxing as having a drink at the end of the day. If I continue this, I think I will enjoy it for the appreciation of procedure, or ritual of it, similar to shaving with DE blade and badger brush.

Do any of you get a "buzz" from smoking a pipe? I did not notice one, but I thought nicotine had that effect. Maybe I did not feel anything since I did not inhale? I know that nicotine can be absorbed through the gums, but maybe that's not enough?

I live in SoCal. It's amazing how closely smoking is associated with marijuana. I asked to look at pipes and the shop owner started to walk over to the bongs and glass pipes. I said "Over here" and pointed to the tobacco pipes. When I left the shop I realized that I had no pipe cleaners, so I stopped in a different shop on my way home, asked if they had pipe cleaners and the woman walked me over to the chemicals that clean glass.
post #80 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reggs View Post

. . . I know that most pipe smokers do not inhale the smoke. I tried it once and it burned my throat. Smoking was relaxing, but I don't think it's as relaxing as having a drink at the end of the day. If I continue this, I think I will enjoy it for the appreciation of procedure, or ritual of it, similar to shaving with DE blade and badger brush.
Do any of you get a "buzz" from smoking a pipe? I did not notice one, but I thought nicotine had that effect. Maybe I did not feel anything since I did not inhale? I know that nicotine can be absorbed through the gums, but maybe that's not enough?. . .
You shouldn't be inhaling pipe smoke. It is for enjoying in the mouth, not the lungs.
As for nicotine, as I understand it, all tobacco leaf used in pipe blends has, more or less, the same nicotine content (i think burley has marginally more). What matters, though, is how much nicotine is absorbed from the smoke in your mouth. That is dependent on, surprisingly, the pH level of the smoke - the more alkaline, the more nicotine will enter your bloodstream. The variables that determine that are the sugar content and some of the curing methods. If you are interested, here is a discussion about this which I am cribbing from memory. A good rule of thumb is that most English Style blends don't deliver much nicotine, but rope tobaccos and some pressed tobaccos deliver more.
Here is a different article that touches on this.
post #81 of 146
Thanks for those links. I smoked again last night while reading. It lasted about a hour, and I only had to relight about 4 times. I think I felt the effects of nicotine. I was pleasantly lightheaded, and it was especially noticeable when I stood up and walked around. I enjoyed smoking much more this time around even though I had lots of tongue bite. I smoked the cherry tobacco, which I think is suppose to burn hot because of the added sugar.

For the reputation smoking has as being a nasty habit, I dont think pipe smoking is that bad. My breath was clear after I brushed my teeth, and I wore a robe, so there was very little scent left on my shirt. The only issue was the smell it left in my hair.

Any thoughts on churchwarden pipes? They look very flamboyant, but I'm 27 and don't plan on smoking in public since I would look pretentious. I imagine the longer stem would make for a cool smoke, and the distance between bowel and face would make for less smoke in the eyes. I can also see how it would be comfortable to use when reading since you could sit in a recline and hold it while resting your hand on your chest.

Anything to be said about filters? Do you use them, and why? How do they effect the smoke?

I read about how you should let the "carbon cake" build up, but what benefits does it have?
post #82 of 146
Yesterday, I bought a Luigi Viprati pipe. This is a relatively inexpensive brand made by a small one or two-man factory in Brescia. It is not superbly made, but I really liked the shape and the sandblasted ring grain. It also had a horn stem. Someone once told me that, as in another field, the English developed and perfected the classic pipe forms and then the Italians adopted them, copying but adding an exuberance to make it their own. While the analogy falls down if you push it too hard, the pipe I bought is a good example. It is roughly in the form of a Prince or Apple, but the shank tapers down from the width of the bowl to the stem and is faceted, with the facets continuing into the straight horn stem. All in all, I thought it beautiful. The internal work is excellent, though the external finishing is less than perfect and the maker's markings are too much on the flamboyant side. I have only smoked it once, but I can suggest this as a brand to look at if you want something relatively inexpensive with a little flair (if you want to keep to the forced analogy, Viprati is local, village-Neopolitan bespoke to Rubinacci's more refined international style).

Today, I thought it might be interesting to try and take some photos of the pipe I bought and explain what I liked about it.

Two things drew me to the pipe - the shape and the grain. The shape, as I said before, is a variation of the Prince, which is one of my favorite shapes. The key to the Prince, is the shape of the bowl, which is a squashed or truncated Apple, a short slim round shank and, usually, a 1/8th bent stem (a slight bend). This pipe foregoes the slim shank, replacing it with a wider shank, that is both tapered to the stem and faceted. Notice also the slight downward angle of the top of the bowl.
These photo gives you an idea of the overall shape.
dsc1722k.jpg
dsc1714.jpg
I like Princes and this variation seemed not only unique, but also elegant and well balanced. Its style had great appeal to me.
I also like sandblasted pipes. That is the process where the softer wood is removed by scouring with an abrasive under air pressure. This is in contrast to rustication, which is basically carving, and smooth, which is simply fine sanding and polishing. Generally speaking, smooth pipes are the most expensive and rusticated are the cheapest, with sandblasting in the middle. While this may seem inverse to the degree of labor involved, it reflects the relative scarcity of "perfect" unblemished wood needed to leave a pipe suitable for a smooth finish. Surface pits revealed when the pipe is carved can be blasted or carved away but will mar a smooth finish, making a clean piece of briar suitable for a smooth finish that much rarer (lower grade pipes get around this by simply having the pits filled with putty and then sanded for a smooth finish). Among smooth pipes, premiums are placed on the graining, with the most expensive pipes being ones with fine "straight grain" running vertically up and down the side of the bowl in tight parallel lines. Some people like cross grain (horizontal) or flame grain or birdseye patterns. Personally, I like smooth pipes well enough but am unmoved by grain and care only that it is relatively even and not blotchy. When I buy a smooth pipe, it is usually for a reason other than the grain. On the other hand, I really like sandblasting and the grain patterns it reveals. While I am happy with any intricate blasted pattern, I especially like it when the grain shows neat parallel rings, stacked around the bowl. Incidentally, that layout generally results from a pipe that would show very good straight grain if smooth. This pipe has beautiful ring grain, and while I have seen tighter rings, I have seen very few pipes that show the ring grain as nicely as this one does. You can see the side view above. Here is the front of the bowl, where the rings are nicely stacked.
dsc1712v.jpg
One thing to keep in mind is that the carver had to orient and shape the pipe in a way that aligns the bowl and shank with the flow of the woodgrain. Notice how carefully the grain is placed at the bottom of the bowl, from which it radiates like ripples in a pond:
dsc1720j.jpg
There are, of course a few things I don't love about this pipe. On the execution/quality side, I have two complaints. First, there is a tiny thumbnail indent type gap in one spot where the stem and shank join. I have not bothered to photograph it, and it may be even to small to try. Nonetheless, it bothers me on principal and almost kept me from buying the pipe. With luck, I will forget about it once the pipe become well used. The other flaw is a design element. The rim of the pipe bowl is much thinner t the front than the rest of the way around. While I think it may be intentional, I would have preferred the rim to be of even width. Or maybe not. I tried to photograph it, and perhaps you can see what I mean.
dsc1716m.jpg
Stemwork and engineering is another important thing to consider in a pipe. You will have to take my word that the pipe is well designed internally with pretty good finishing. The stem is horn and the button and slotting are a bit cruder than I expected, but that may be because it is horn, which is more delicate and harder to work - I will note that the other horn stems by this maker were made the same way, while the regular stems were finished quite nicely. I am also impressed with the faceting on the stem, which continues the shape of the shank. That is very nicely done. By the way, the horn is mottled, like a dark horn coat button, but I cannot photograph that very well.
The one thing that does annoy me about this pipe, which I think I will not get over, is the ridiculous signature. While it is typical for pipemakers to mask a bit of the pipe stem from the blasting medium to make a smooth spot for stamping the name, grade and other markings, it is done to an absurd extreme here, with a huge L. Viprati signature and "Hand Made in Italy" engraving. Here is how it looks - it would be better at half or a third the size.
dsc1719c.jpg

All that aside, I thought it was a beautiful pipe and, because of the grain pattern and shape, I was glad to buy it.

As I am sure is clear by know, much of what I have discussed is simply a matter of personal taste and aesthetics. Certainly, my tastes have evolved over time as I learned what I liked and didn't like and I would not be surprised if others came to very different conclusions. But once you get past the engineering and briar quality, personal taste and aesthetics are what matter.
Edited by dopey - 3/21/12 at 5:42pm
post #83 of 146
Sorry not a pipe picture but it is smoking related . Best tobacco I have smoked was shop-mixed by old Boston shop on Harvard Ave in Brighton . It had some coconut flav.

Photobucket
post #84 of 146
Thread Starter 
Dopey, incredible write up and pictures. Thanks for that.

Today I had a nice bowl in a Nording pipe. It's a "sitter" so I can set it down and it will balance itself nicely. Big bowl, thick sides cool smoke. I used some tobacco I bought in Vegas. There's a cigar/pipe shop in the Venetian shop gallery. This mix is entitled "Casanova" and is very subtle. Great way to end a fantastic day.
post #85 of 146
By way of update, I have been getting a lot of use out of the Viprati I described above. I decided to make it my dedicated Stonehenge pipe. Since that is my favorite tobacco, the Viprati goes stretches of being smoked every other day and is getting a chance to break-in nicely. While I will on rare occasions run more than one bowl through it in a day, I try to give the Viprati at least a day off after every day of use.

Reggs - sorry I missed your questions earlier
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reggs View Post

Thanks for those links. I smoked again last night while reading. It lasted about a hour, and I only had to relight about 4 times. I think I felt the effects of nicotine. I was pleasantly lightheaded, and it was especially noticeable when I stood up and walked around. I enjoyed smoking much more this time around even though I had lots of tongue bite. I smoked the cherry tobacco, which I think is suppose to burn hot because of the added sugar.
For the reputation smoking has as being a nasty habit, I dont think pipe smoking is that bad. My breath was clear after I brushed my teeth, and I wore a robe, so there was very little scent left on my shirt. The only issue was the smell it left in my hair.
Any thoughts on churchwarden pipes? They look very flamboyant, but I'm 27 and don't plan on smoking in public since I would look pretentious. I imagine the longer stem would make for a cool smoke, and the distance between bowel and face would make for less smoke in the eyes. I can also see how it would be comfortable to use when reading since you could sit in a recline and hold it while resting your hand on your chest.
This all makes sense and is what people say. I mostly smoke when walking or outside, so churchwardens are of little use to me and I haven't bothered to pay too close attention.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reggs View Post

Anything to be said about filters? Do you use them, and why? How do they effect the smoke?
I don't use them. I think their primary benefit is to take up moisture. I don't smoke aromatics and, in general, moisture is not a problem so I don't bother with them. It also seems like it would restrict the draw a bit, which I don't want.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reggs View Post

I read about how you should let the "carbon cake" build up, but what benefits does it have?
The following is mostly hearsay, and I welcome any corrections:
The main benefits are that they protect the wood of the pipe from burnout (basically charring and burning through) and prevent the smoke from picking up much of the briar taste (it should still let vapor through to be absorbed by the wood). On the other hand, depending on what you smoke, the cake may get saturated with its own flavor. Keep in mind that most pipes sold have a coating on the bowl already, which is intended to prevent burnout and impart a neutral flavor. One coating, called waterglass, is as protective as a full cake, though it is also a complete barrier to the wood.

I don't try to build up a cake - in fact, I swab the inside of the bowl with a pipe cleaner after each use, which slows the growth of a cake - but am happy to let it develop over time. But if a pipe is new and uncoated and doesn't have much carbon inside, I smoke it very carefully.
Edited by dopey - 3/26/12 at 6:48am
post #86 of 146
How do all of you store your pipe tobacco?

As I'm not a frequent smoker, I've found that a few of my tins are getting dry. I've thought about a humidor, but everything looks to be made for cigars. I've also seen jars mentioned, but not sure what the right course would be.
post #87 of 146
Thread Starter 
Cool morning so I sat outside with my coffee and a bowl. Smoked my Peterson which has a nice brawny bowl and provides a cool smoke. I used Peterson tobacco as that seemed fitting; 2010 Holiday Blend.

Count, I put mine inside a 1 gallon Ziplock, with a handful of those clay moisturizing tablets, and put the whole thing in the fridge.
post #88 of 146
Keep my tobacco in the ziplock it came in (an aromatic) and in a ceramic jar I have. IT's stored with the pipe, cleaner and toolkit.

Call me crazy but I inhale my pipe tobacco smoke. I get a slight buzz.
post #89 of 146
I've continued to smoke, and when I realized that this would be a normal part of my week-to-week routine, I bought more stuff.

I've purchased a smaller, 7.5 inch churchwarden pipe:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004ECQ9XM/ref=oh_o05_s00_i00_details

It was a bad purchase. The stem is misshapen, all the materials feel cheap, and I suspect the bowel is made of rosewood based not only on the color, but mostly on the light weight. The stem is also too narrow to bite onto comfortably. It's too small.

I've also purchased this "Strictly English" pipe tobacco sampler kit:
http://www.pipesandcigars.com/busasen.html

Last I checked, only two of the tobaccos in this kit have 4/5 stars on tobacco reviews, the rest were lower. I've only tried Medium English, and Majestic English. Majestic English is very delicious and has been my favorite tobacco so far. It keeps a good light too. The only downside is that there is still a taste in my mouth after I brush my teeth. It's very heavy and creamy. I only smoke 1-2 times a weeks, so I think these sampler kits are a worthwhile purchase to find something that I enjoy since I smoke too slowly to commit to tins to test different tobaccos out.

I also got a tin of Dunhill Nightcap:
http://www.tobaccoreviews.com/blend_detail.cfm?ALPHA=N&TID=459

Dunhill Nightcap seems to be some sort of standard. Many people cite it as their favorite blend, and many who review English blends will use Nightcap as a comparison, so I wanted to get a tin for myself. I've read that some people will open a tin of this and let it sit for a few weeks to bring out a flavor that's more similar to "the old way" they use to formulate Nightcap. I left my tin open 9 hrs before I started to smoke it. I find that it holds a light well, but makes a lot of ash. The taste is very good, but not as good as the Majestic English I got in my sampler. However, I smoke this more often since it doesn't leave such a strong taste in my mouth, even after I brush my teeth.

I always like to end my day's with something relaxing. I'll often to the sauna before bed. Pipe smoking is something new to the rotation. I read a lot, so it fits that activity well. I usually read here:
Pipe-2.jpg

None of this is mine. It's in the condominium complex I live in. We have a "library" on one of the floors. No one ever uses it, most of the books are cheesy romance novels, and every Star Trek book that has ever been written. It has large open windows and very comfortable chairs. After 11PM I will go here to smoke and read for an hr or so with the windows open. Of course, smoking is not allowed here, but this is a forgotten place. No one ever uses this room, and a good 60% of the books are throw a way books from the 70's. The smell of my smoke clears very quickly with the windows opened. I've checked by sniffing around after I come home from work, smoking the night before. This is my smoking ritual.

Pipe-1.jpg

I wear a seersucker robe when I smoke to shield my clothes against the smoke. This is the small churchwarden pipe I am not happy with.

Eventually I would like to travel to this shop:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5wNLP6tvouc

It's the most reputable tobacconist in my area. It's 30 mins away. I want to buy a quality churchwarden pipe and a good pipe lighter.
post #90 of 146
LOL you use a kindle and shop for pipes on amazon
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › The Official Pipe, Pipe Tobacco, Accessories, and Smoking Thread.