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post #871 of 1305
Thread Starter 
I'm intrigued. I wish I still had a Playstation lying around
post #872 of 1305

I have the demo queued to download, but i think I should probably just buy it. How much is it? 10 bucks?

post #873 of 1305
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lionheart Biker View Post

I have the demo queued to download, but i think I should probably just buy it. How much is it? 10 bucks?

 

15, but I would gladly have paid 60 for it. Bought the soundtrack too.

post #874 of 1305
Quote:
Originally Posted by thewho13 View Post


been listening to this guys ep because of your recommendation icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
post #875 of 1305
Thread Starter 
Is that the Tom Cruise guy ?
post #876 of 1305
Quote:
Originally Posted by sipang View Post

Is that the Tom Cruise guy ?
yeah, i couldnt figure out if he was impersonating tom cruise or christian bale laugh.gif
post #877 of 1305
Journey was awesome, and so was Chris Marker.
post #878 of 1305
is that the guy from the boardroom meeting video?
post #879 of 1305
I absolutely love these book covers (also helps that he's one of my favorite authors, and note the tiny specimen pins):









And my favorite:

post #880 of 1305












Adolf Wölfli, an artist about whom I do not know too much yet, grew up in a household where we was "abused both physically and sexually." Orphaned as a child, he cycled through "a series of state-run foster homes" until he found work as, first, a farm laborer, and subsequently, as a soldier in the army. He was convicted of, and served time for, attempted child molestation. He eventually wound up in a psychiatric ward where his suffering from sever hallucinations (a result of a descent into psychosis) was recorded. During the time in which he was committed for his "debilitating condition," he began to produce incredibly complex, and equally elaborate, works of art—all produced from the meager bounty of pencils that he was able to obtain while in the state's ward.

Here is a quote from Walter Morgenthaler, a doctor at one of the clinics where Wölfli spent time:

"Every Monday morning Wölfli is given a new pencil and two large sheets of unprinted newsprint. The pencil is used up in two days; then he has to make do with the stubs he has saved or with whatever he can beg off someone else. He often writes with pieces only five to seven millimetres long and even with the broken-off points of lead, which he handles deftly, holding them between his fingernails. He carefully collects packing paper and any other paper he can get from the guards and patients in his area; otherwise he would run out of paper before the next Sunday night. At Christmas the house gives him a box of coloured pencils, which lasts him two or three weeks at the most."
post #881 of 1305
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Time View Post

It’s one of the great ironies of journalism that it’s a lot easier to capture close-up images of the murderous business of war than of the peaceable work of putting people and payloads in space. But the rules are as strict as they are extreme: On launch days, rockets sit at the middle of a circular evacuation zone that, in the case of the space shuttles and the old Saturn V’s, stretched up to three miles in all directions. That no-go rule has never diminished the demand for arm’s-length images of the liftoffs—and satisfying that demand has called for some creative thinking, engineering and camera-rigging on the part of the people taking the pictures.

Dan Winters, who grew up during the golden age—the Cronkite Age—of space reporting, is one of the photographers who has mastered the craft best.

The work begins the day before launch, when he positions up to nine cameras as little as 700 ft. (213 m) away from the pad. Each camera is manually focused and set for the particular shot it is meant to capture, and the wheels of the lens are then taped into position so that they can’t be shaken out of focus when the engines are lit. Electronic triggers—of Winters’ own devising—that do react to the vibrations are attached to the cameras so that the shutter will start snapping the instant ignition occurs.

To prevent the cameras from tipping over on their tripods, Winters drills anchoring posts deep into the soil and attaches the tripods to them with the same tie-down straps truckers use to secure their loads. He also braces each leg of the tripod with 50-lb. (23 kg) sandbags to minimize vibration. Waterproof tarps protect the whole assembly until launch day, when they are removed and the cameras are armed. Throughout the launch, they fire at up to five frames per second. Only after the vehicle has vanished into the sky and the pad crew has inspected the area for brushfires, toxic residue and other dangers, are the photographers allowed to recover their equipment.

The shuttles have now been mothballed, never to fly again. Other, unmanned rockets are already flying and other American astronauts will surely go aloft from Cape Canaveral before too many years have gone by. But until then, the old shuttles endure in images like Winters’—which will prove to be far more permanent than the great machines themselves.








post #882 of 1305

CASBAH CONFIDENTIAL: SERGE LUTENS
THIRTY-FIVE YEARS IN THE MAKING, THE HOME OF
RECLUSIVE PERFUMER SERGE LUTENS IS THE
ULTIMATE MOROCCAN HIDEOUT.



Located in the heart of Marrakech’s medina, Serge Lutens’ house contains
several sitting rooms like this one. Lutens designed virtually everything here,
including the wall and ceiling carvings, the mosaics, the lamps and the pattern
on the velvet banquettes. “You could call it an obsession,” says Lutens of the
house, which has been under construction for the past 35 years.


As massive and magnificent as the house is, Lutens, who is famously reclusive,
has shown it to hardly anyone. In fact, he doesn’t even sleep in it; he spends
most of his time in a small studio outside of town. The house “chased me out,”
he says. Here, a dining room, in which he never dines. The works on the wall
are by Paul Jouve; the table is Lutens’ design.


The entrance to Lutens’ laboratory, where he sometimes does research for his
fragrances, many of which are inspired by the musks and spices of Morocco.
For the intricate Moorish patterns on the walls and ceilings, Lutens drew
inspiration from medieval North African designs he found in books.


Serge Lutens in a courtyard with his chief houseman, Rachid. At one point
Lutens had more than 500 people working on the house. “I felt like the
director of the pyramid at Cheops,” he recalls.


The main patio is planted with brigmansia, tuberose and datura. Botanical
influences are prominent in Lutens designs for the house, as well as in
his fragrances. “The real great perfumers are not perfumers,” Lutens
says. “They are the bees, the winds, the rivers and other things that
carry and mix scents in space.”


A doorway on the roof terrace.


The office, with a Paul Jouve drawing and a pair of 19th century Syrian
chairs that Lutens found at a Paris antiques shop. Now that the house
is mostly complete, Lutens is tempted to abandon it forever and move
to a small, Spartan maid’s room somewhere. His friend Anjelica Huston
doesn’t find the idea so far-fetched. “I wouldn’t be surprised if Serge’s
next home were a little yurt,” she says.


In another sitting room, the walls are lined with Lutens’ collection of
antique Berber artifacts, including fibulae, the ornate silver clothing
fasteners that he started buying by the dozens. “Soon every antique dealer
in Morocco knew Serge was looking for fibulae,” says Lutens’ associate
Patrice Nagel. “So they scoured the country for more—and sold them at
a huge markup, of course.”


Another sitting room, with works from Lutens's Orientalist collection.






A closer look at the fibulae and antique Berber jewelry in Lutens’ collection.




Throughout the house, there are stained glass windows inspired by medieval
Moorish designs. Lutens was fixated on getting every detail right: It took a
team of 10 workers about seven years to complete one tiny room, a domed
sitting area next to the hammam. He wonders whether, like a writer who’s
terrified of finishing his novel, he has sometimes invented excuses to stave off
the project’s inevitable end. “There are times where you just have to be
completely occupied,” he says, “otherwise you fall apart.”
MakeMyBeauty interview de Monsieur Lutens. (Click to show)
Quote:
MakeMyBeauty consacre cette première semaine de septembre à la marque Serge Lutens et nous commencerons par l’interview de Monsieur Lutens.

Personnage mystérieux, fascinant, visionnaire qui nous enchante de ses créations depuis si longtemps.

Coiffeur, maquillleur, parfumeur, photographe, poète,…. nous étions à la fois ravies d’interviewer Monsieur



Lutens mais en même temps il faut bien l’avouer un peu impressionnées par l’aura du personnage.

D’autre part sa fragilité et sa sensibilité nous donnent envie de le serrer dans nos bras.

Ci-dessous l’échange que nous avons eu avec Serge Lutens….





MakeMyBeauty : Où puisez vous vos sources d’inspiration ? Qu’est ce qui donne la première impulsion à vos créations ?

Serge Lutens : En fait, tout ce qui est, en, et autour de moi. Pour préciser, j’utiliserais la métaphore :

Je suis conduit par un couloir. Devant moi, se déroule un tapis rouge, comme disent les Amerloques : « red carpet ». Au fond du couloir, comme une parenthèse, grands ouverts, deux battants ouvrent sur une pièce de réception d’où se diffuse, l’air artificiel d’une cocktail party d’une société sans raffinement. Prise entre les coupes de champagne, la musique et les rires. Elle attend, on ne sait trop quoi ? Un nouveau truc peut-être ? A droite, à gauche, se faisant face, au centre de ce même passage, deux portes. La première est entrouverte, elle laisse par l’entre-baillement, tel un clin d’œil, filtrer un faisceau de lumière. L’autre, n’existe plus depuis longtemps pour personne. Lourde porte en métal rouillée et me semble t-il condamnée. Or, c’est précisément elle que je tente d’ouvrir et plus encore si elle me résiste de la forcer. C’est là que je désire m’introduire. Une fois ouverte, derrière la porte, attend tout un peuple. Ils me fixent, tous souriants, car libérés mais aussi, comme le génie de la bouteille de Simbad, furieux d’avoir attendus trop longtemps leur délivrance.

Dès cet instant, il me faut saisir leur essence et, comprendre avec l’autorité du charme, comment concilier leur histoire et la mienne et faire qu’elle est un parfum.



MMB : Quelles sont les couleurs, les matières, les odeurs…que vous affectionnez tout particulièrement ?

SL : Si je vous réponds, le noir avec le blanc, cela ne veut rien dire. Si les couleurs, les matières, les odeurs ne sont pas mises en situation, elles ne peuvent pas me retenir. Sachez aussi que le noir contient toutes les couleurs ; elles s’y réfugient.



MMB : Vos secrets de beauté ?

SL : Que nomme t’on « secret »? Si on le révèle, il ne l’est déjà plus.

Comme je l’ai déjà exprimé, la beauté, c’est le moment où l’on relève la tête, c’est le moment où l’on saisit sa conscience.



MMB : Quel est votre produit de make-up favori ?

SL : Personnellement, je n’en use pas. Celui qui vous convient.



MMB : Selon vous, quels sont les pires beauty « faux pas » ?

SL : Un manque de quant-à-soi.



MMB : Faites nous une beauty confidence ?

SL : Une confidence sur des cils, des lèvres ?

Le fard se démaquille, une idée c’est plus tenace, donc…Concluez !



MMB : Pour avoir eu la chance de tester quelques produits de maquillage Serge Lutens, entre autre le khôl et le mascara, je me suis sentie comme une Mata-Hari, avec un vrai œil charbonneux des années 20. Etait-ce votre volonté que l’on retrouve dans le Nécessaire de Beauté, ces matières très denses et très tenaces d’autrefois ?

SL : Je ne sais pas pour autrefois, mais, à ce jour, c’est certain : « Que ma volonté soit faite sur vos lèvres comme au ciel ! »



MMB : Vos créations olfactives nous transportent dans un monde onirique, poétique, unique. A quel voyage vous invitez nous avec le Nécessaire de Beauté ?

SL : A celui que vous vous offrez.



MMB : Pouvez-vous nous définir le style Serge Lutens ?

SL : J’ignore s’il y en a un, mais, s’il existe, il n’est pas volontaire. Le style n’est pas volonté mais conséquence.



MMB : Le Nécessaire de Beauté ne contient que des essentiels et va, à contre sens de la profusion de produits que propose les autres maisons. Nous avons bien compris que c’était une volonté de votre part, mais pensez-vous que chaque femme peut se contenter de ce mini-choix ?

SL : C’est un choix. Cela me parait très sage. Cela correspond peut-être à ce que vous nommez « style » dans votre précédente question ? Il est certain que le Nécessaire de Beauté offrira des possibilités dans le futur mais sans que pour cela, la ligne ne s’agrandisse. Qui peut le moins peut le plus.



MMB : Lorsque vous créez, à qui pensez-vous ? A qui destinez-vous vos créations ? A la personne qui va les porter, à vous-même, à votre mère ?

SL : L’intention en « création » rend ce mot vide de sens. S’il peut vous arriver de retrouver quelque chose de vous-même en ce que j’ai pu suggérer, c’est que cela répondait. A qui précisément, je ne sais pas…



MMB : Pouvez vous faire une confidence à MMB ? Sur quels projets travaillez-vous en ce moment ?

SL : Sur de multiples choses, mais en fait, à la réflexion, sur moi-même.



MMB : Une vilaine rumeur nous a dit, que le jour de votre disparition, vous emporterez dans la tombe toutes vos créations. Est-ce vrai que nous ne pourrons plus jamais porter notre parfum préféré ?

SL : Ne vous inquiétez pas, ma mort est en bonne santé. Pour la suite, franchement, la postérité ne me concerne pas !


post #883 of 1305
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by thewho13 View Post




Adolf Wölfli, an artist about whom I do not know too much yet, grew up in a household where we was "abused both physically and sexually." Orphaned as a child, he cycled through "a series of state-run foster homes" until he found work as, first, a farm laborer, and subsequently, as a soldier in the army. He was convicted of, and served time for, attempted child molestation. He eventually wound up in a psychiatric ward where his suffering from sever hallucinations (a result of a descent into psychosis) was recorded. During the time in which he was committed for his "debilitating condition," he began to produce incredibly complex, and equally elaborate, works of art—all produced from the meager bounty of pencils that he was able to obtain while in the state's ward.
Here is a quote from Walter Morgenthaler, a doctor at one of the clinics where Wölfli spent time:
"Every Monday morning Wölfli is given a new pencil and two large sheets of unprinted newsprint. The pencil is used up in two days; then he has to make do with the stubs he has saved or with whatever he can beg off someone else. He often writes with pieces only five to seven millimetres long and even with the broken-off points of lead, which he handles deftly, holding them between his fingernails. He carefully collects packing paper and any other paper he can get from the guards and patients in his area; otherwise he would run out of paper before the next Sunday night. At Christmas the house gives him a box of coloured pencils, which lasts him two or three weeks at the most."

At one time I had an obsessive collection of outsider art, spending my vacations knocking on the doors of savants across the rural south and visiting galleries across NA and EU. Eventually, collecting art by lunatics drove me a little nutty myself.
post #884 of 1305
Thread Starter 
Things to watch if you have taste


The Thick of It








post #885 of 1305
Spanish skater Kilian Martin refers to his style of skateboarding as "art on wheels" and it's tough to argue when he's releasing videos like the clip below, Altered Route, filmed by Brett Novak. Kilian has followed in the path laid out by freestyle pioneer Rodney Mullen, mixing incredibly inventive, unique, and technical tricks with obstacles and flow you'd find in street skating. This clip features some of Kilian's latest work, set in the eerie backdrop of an abondoned waterpark near Palm Springs.

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