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Meermin Mallorca Shoes - Page 982

post #14716 of 15515
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post

The disadvantage of GW isn't the cork, it's the gluing of a canvas "feather" to which the welt is sewn, to the insole, as opposed to sewing it into a hand-cut groove.  Cork is a good and proven base for the footbed and can happily last as long as the leather sole before being replaced at the same time.

The only alternative to such fillers is to use a full leather midsole instead of a welt, as with the Blake Rapid construction - that although machine stitched, does away with the glued "feather".  I believe our own village elder Mr Frommer is even a fan of this as the best mass-manufacture construction method.
It was often mentioned that cork is effusive and gives way on the parts of the sole that receive the most pressure - different than the mentioned thicker leather insole. The best thing is, if there is no cavity at all that requires filling.

But this is not the proper thread for this. It is just revealing to me how the HW Meermins really look like from the inside.
post #14717 of 15515
Quote:
Originally Posted by joman8390 View Post
 

I'm looking for some opinions on Olfe vs. Hiro, I want to get some balmoral boots but I'm not sure if I should go with the dark brown calf GMTO offering on the olfe last or one of the RTW offerings on the hiro last, any thoughts would be appreciated!! Also do people tend to wear the same size for both Hiro and Olfe?

 

Thanks!

 

Most people go the same size with Hiro vs Olfe as they do fit similarly. Olfe is definitely a more sleeker looking last, and fit-wise, I would say it's slightly more snug than Hiro; slightly lower instep and tighter heel.

post #14718 of 15515
Quote:
Originally Posted by globobock View Post


It was often mentioned that cork is effusive and gives way on the parts of the sole that receive the most pressure - different than the mentioned thicker leather insole. The best thing is, if there is no cavity at all that requires filling.

But this is not the proper thread for this. It is just revealing to me how the HW Meermins really look like from the inside.

 

All welted shoes by definition have a space between the welt that needs filling with something - whether hand or machine welted.  Some makers prefer a single solid piece of cork to the "porridge" because it is more stable.  But either way, it's replaceable as often as the sole, and helps the shoe form to the foot.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bm93 View Post
 

 

Most people go the same size with Hiro vs Olfe as they do fit similarly. Olfe is definitely a more sleeker looking last, and fit-wise, I would say it's slightly more snug than Hiro; slightly lower instep and tighter heel.

 

They fit very differently.  As with any non-bespoke shoe, every last fits every person differently.  I have both, and indeed take them in the same size, but neither is perfect:  The Hiro feels more roomy over all, with a deeper instep and toe box and wider through the heel and mid section.  However, it's also straighter than the Olfe, and feels narrower laterally across the toes.  

 

So conversely, the Olfe is snug in the heel and through the waist, low in the instep - especially upper/mid instep - but feels wider across the width of the toes as it curves more like my banana feet.  The only Olfe I have is a monk, and that took some breaking in: the balmoral boots I bought were physically impossible to put on because of the shallow upper instep.

post #14719 of 15515
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post
 

 

All welted shoes by definition have a space between the welt that needs filling with something - whether hand or machine welted.  Some makers prefer a single solid piece of cork to the "porridge" because it is more stable.  But either way, it's replaceable as often as the sole, and helps the shoe form to the foot.

I'm sorry, but I don't think that is true.

By using a thicker insole and cutting/channeling the holdfast from that insole, there is no cavity that requires any filling, since the holdfast is flat/parallel to the insole.

 

On gemmed GYW, the holdfast is almost perpendicular to the insole, thus the cavity.

post #14720 of 15515

Ok , you are right. So  could you please mention what GYW/HW brand/shoemaker can you get a pair of shoes from without any filler?. 

post #14721 of 15515
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post
 

Ok , you are right. So  could you please mention what GYW/HW brand/shoemaker can you get a pair of shoes from without any filler?. 


1. This is not the thread for this

2. GYW without filler? You serious?

3. Shoemakers: any bespoke shoemakers

 

About HW - just curious. Are your Handwelted Vass using filler? Real question here. Never seen them cut up.

 

And I guess, but will not put my Hands in fire for this - St. Crispin, Zonky et all shouldn't use filler.

post #14722 of 15515
Quote:
Originally Posted by globobock View Post
 


1. This is not the thread for this

2. GYW without filler? You serious?

3. Shoemakers: any bespoke shoemakers

 

About HW - just curious. Are your Handwelted Vass using filler? Real question here. Never seen them cut up.

 

And I guess, but will not put my Hands in fire for this - St. Crispin, Zonky et all shouldn't use filler.

I understand you started this.  All of the names you mentioned use cork sheet as a filler (at least Vass and SC) and Meermin cork paste. You did not mentioned any bespoke shoemaker yet.  

post #14723 of 15515
Quote:
Originally Posted by globobock View Post
 

I'm sorry, but I don't think that is true.

By using a thicker insole and cutting/channeling the holdfast from that insole, there is no cavity that requires any filling, since the holdfast is flat/parallel to the insole.

 

On gemmed GYW, the holdfast is almost perpendicular to the insole, thus the cavity.

 

On gemmed GYW there isn't a holdfast.  That's why there's gemming.

 

On handwelted shoes, the holdfast is a simple slit; it doesn't make the insole any more or less prominent, or alter its thickness to accommodate the welt.

 

The difference making the gap is the welt, by whichever means it's attached. As it's a strip running only around the outside, the thickness of that strip is essentially the gap between the outsole and insole.  Filling it with something more accommodating than leather, usually cork, is standard practice for every welted shoe I've ever seen.

 

So back to the point: whether or not Meermin use cork for their footbed is not really a controversial issue.  It might be reasonable to suggest that they use a solid piece of cork instead of the "porridge", but it's not unusual, especially as their LM line are at mainstream Euro/US GW prices. 

post #14724 of 15515
Hi gentlemen,

I'm going to purchase a pair of Meermin Loafer in Last Ron. I checked quite a bit comments out online and most of them suggested to down half size for the loafer. My main concern here is about the width as my foot are pretty wide I think.

Additionally, I have a pair of Carmina in Last Rain and they actually fit my foots quite good. There is not much extra space for the width but a bit heel slip.

Will appreciate if anyone can provide some advises on what size I should go for the Meermin loafer. Thanks!
post #14725 of 15515
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post

On gemmed GYW there isn't a holdfast.  That's why there's gemming.

On handwelted shoes, the holdfast is a simple slit; it doesn't make the insole any more or less prominent, or alter its thickness to accommodate the welt.

The difference making the gap is the welt, by whichever means it's attached. As it's a strip running only around the outside, the thickness of that strip is essentially the gap between the outsole and insole.  Filling it with something more accommodating than leather, usually cork, is standard practice for every welted shoe I've ever seen.

So back to the point: whether or not Meermin use cork for their footbed is not really a controversial issue.  It might be reasonable to suggest that they use a solid piece of cork instead of the "porridge", but it's not unusual, especially as their LM line are at mainstream Euro/US GW prices. 



First, let me say that I was asked to comment here...

On GY, the gemming functions as a holdfast. In a technical sense, it is a holdfast because it "holds" the inseam "fast." In that sense, all a holdfast is, is an anchor point for the inseaming.

On handwelted shoes, the the holdfast is not a slit but the material between the slit and the rebate (feather) or, less often, the edge of the insole. Again, the materials between the slit and the feather acts as an anchor to "hold fast" the inseam..

Gemming is always proud of the plantar surface of the insole. This creates a considerable forepart cavity that must be filled.

On handwelted work, the welt and upper are...ideally...drawn into the rebate cut into the insole (AKA the "feather"). And as a result, minimal or no cavity is created. So filling the forepart with cork is not automatically necessary. A thin piece of leather or felt will suffice. And even that is more to prevent "creaking" than to fill the gap.

DSCF1563.JPG

Hope this helps.

edited for punctuation and clarity
Edited by DWFII - 4/7/16 at 9:30pm
post #14726 of 15515

Hi guys, this is my first post but I have been reading SF for quite some time. I just received my first Meermin purchase and I have very mixed reactions. The shoes are the classic cap toe in Elton last in OAK ANTIQUE CALF (101534), pictured below. Link. Below are my pictures and notes on my first impression. In regards to fit, I ordered a size 8UK, which fit really well. I usually wear size 9US in AE and 8US in TBNY. 

 

 

1) Color - I liked the color but they felt rather flat as compared to their picture. From the picture, I was expecting more of the glossy shine that you would expect from TBNY, Magnanni, or Suit Supply shoes. 

 

2) Cap toe burnish - minimal as compared to the picture. Not a bad thing. But notice how the Left shoe cap toe is slightly darker than the Right shoe. Not a deal breaker. Thoughts? 

 

3) Dark paint where the leather meets the sole -  Not sure about the terminology for this detail but it adds some depth and it is all around on the Right shoe. However, as seen in the picture below the paint stops where the cap toe ends in the Left shoe (outer side of the shoe). I know the lighting in the pics is not great but trust me, I am not referring to a shadow effect. 

 

4) WHITE DOTS along the stitching running along the laces - First time that I encounter this and by far the most annoying quality control issue. The dots are on both sides of the Right and Left shoe. Clearly the white dots are what remains of the guide for the stitching. How did Meermin QC did not notice this! Any of you encountered this?

 

Hope I didn't overwhelm you or break forum rules with the amount of pictures. Please let me know what you think of my observations and your suggestions for approaching Meermin about this. It's just disappointing to receive this level quality. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

^-- do you notice the brushed dark coloring? 

 

 

 

 

 

post #14727 of 15515
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

First, let me say that I was asked to comment here...

On GY, the gemming functions as a holdfast. In a technical sense, it is a holdfast because it "holds" the inseam "fast." In that sense, all a holdfast is, is an anchor point for the inseaming.

On handwelted shoes, the the holdfast is not a slit but the material between the slit and the rebate (feather) or, less often, the edge of the insole. Again, the materials between the slit and the feather acts as an anchor to "hold fast" the inseam..

Gemming is always proud of the plantar surface of the insole. This creates a considerable forepart cavity that must be filled.

On handwelted work, the welt and upper are...ideally...drawn into the rebate cut into the insole (AKA the "feather"). And as a result, minimal or no cavity is created. So filling the forepart with cork is not automatically necessary. A thin piece of leather or felt will suffice. And even that is more to prevent "creaking" than to fill the gap.


Hope this helps.

edited for punctuation and clarity

Thx DFW!
Yes, it was me asking DFW for his opinion because the back and forth was getting too far IMHO, so a clear expert opinion should enlighten all of us.
post #14728 of 15515
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miserable View Post

Hi gentlemen,

I'm going to purchase a pair of Meermin Loafer in Last Ron. I checked quite a bit comments out online and most of them suggested to down half size for the loafer. My main concern here is about the width as my foot are pretty wide I think.

Additionally, I have a pair of Carmina in Last Rain and they actually fit my foots quite good. There is not much extra space for the width but a bit heel slip.

Will appreciate if anyone can provide some advises on what size I should go for the Meermin loafer. Thanks!

I just bought a pair of loafers in the Ron last in my normal size UK9.5. I have what you could call wide feet and I find them quite tight in the toebox (surprisingly tighter than the Hiro last), so personally I would not size down. There is no heel slippage.

Your best bet is to send Meermin measurements of your foot, they are usually quite good at answering customer e-mails.
post #14729 of 15515
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucho View Post
 

Hi guys, this is my first post but I have been reading SF for quite some time. I just received my first Meermin purchase and I have very mixed reactions. The shoes are the classic cap toe in Elton last in OAK ANTIQUE CALF (101534), pictured below. Link. Below are my pictures and notes on my first impression. In regards to fit, I ordered a size 8UK, which fit really well. I usually wear size 9US in AE and 8US in TBNY. 

 

 

1) Color - I liked the color but they felt rather flat as compared to their picture. From the picture, I was expecting more of the glossy shine that you would expect from TBNY, Magnanni, or Suit Supply shoes. 

 

2) Cap toe burnish - minimal as compared to the picture. Not a bad thing. But notice how the Left shoe cap toe is slightly darker than the Right shoe. Not a deal breaker. Thoughts? 

 

3) Dark paint where the leather meets the sole -  Not sure about the terminology for this detail but it adds some depth and it is all around on the Right shoe. However, as seen in the picture below the paint stops where the cap toe ends in the Left shoe (outer side of the shoe). I know the lighting in the pics is not great but trust me, I am not referring to a shadow effect. 

 

4) WHITE DOTS along the stitching running along the laces - First time that I encounter this and by far the most annoying quality control issue. The dots are on both sides of the Right and Left shoe. Clearly the white dots are what remains of the guide for the stitching. How did Meermin QC did not notice this! Any of you encountered this?

 

Hope I didn't overwhelm you or break forum rules with the amount of pictures. Please let me know what you think of my observations and your suggestions for approaching Meermin about this. It's just disappointing to receive this level quality. 

 

nice shoe! I think most of their shoes on the website (especially the recent collection with antique leather) have been polished to high gloss shine and maybe even use more photo editing function. Its normal to received your shoes without a shine but you can build your shine later. The uneven toe burnishing might look better if you apply dark brown or black wax to the toe. About the extra dark paint around the stitching and places near the welt, probably their bad finishing and QC. My carmina have some of that as well but should be able to polish out. Big point that came across my eyes is indeed that white dots, never encounter something like that before. Are those a hole or a thread or what? If you cant do something to get rid of it, I think you should contact them.

post #14730 of 15515

I actually liked that they did not come with that much shine or burnishing since I now have the opportunity to do that myself (if I keep them). Regarding the white dots, they re not holes or threads. The dots seem to be painted on the leather. I tried to rub them out with my bare thumb without much luck. I will send an email to Meermin over the weekend with my observations and also ask them how to remove these white dots. 

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