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Starting over. Where shoud I move to? - Page 3

post #31 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord-Barrington View Post

I'll offend a lot of people by saying this, but...:
I wouldn't live in any other American city but San Diego, Denver, Seattle, Portland, Boston, NYC, San Francisco, or Chicago (and maybe a couple more I have forgotten). People can say what they want about how Cleveland and Cincinnati are "up and coming cities" or how Phoenix and Scottsdale are a great "bang for the buck" but the fact of the matter is that second tier cities like that suck. They're sprawled out, they have little in the way of culture, the culinary scene is usually garbage, and you'll lose touch with the finer things in life the minute you settle down.
Life is too short to live in crappy cities, no matter what you might try to tell yourself.

From my experience, your list is pretty generous. I wouldn't want to live in any of those cities except NYC, and with quite a number of clauses too I guess. On the other hand, if I was single and ready to mingle, had something to do with my days and had enough money to have fun, there'd be nothing better than picking on corny coeds in a big college town in the midwest. Not a sustainable course in life, but if it were me and I were single, I could live in a larger sized college town and have a great small business, make a bunch of money, get my pick amongst a bunch of women, and generally live the good life.
post #32 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post

From my experience, your list is pretty generous. I wouldn't want to live in any of those cities except NYC, and with quite a number of clauses too I guess. On the other hand, if I was single and ready to mingle, had something to do with my days and had enough money to have fun, there'd be nothing better than picking on corny coeds in a big college town in the midwest. Not a sustainable course in life, but if it were me and I were single, I could live in a larger sized college town and have a great small business, make a bunch of money, get my pick amongst a bunch of women, and generally live the good life.

I guess that could work if you wanted to be knee deep in coed poontang. If you actually want to do anything else besides bang sorority chicks though, living in Columbus or East Lansing would suck fiercely.

And regarding the Portland/Seattle thing, I would live there but neither would be my first choice. Honestly North American cities I'm open to live in right now are basically Boston, SD, Montreal (current), Toronto, NYC, and that's probably it.
post #33 of 90
I think there's something to the fact that the older a city, the better the quality of life tends to be there. People wonder why the French and Italians seem to so consistently have nice cafes/bakeries on every corner, quiet leafy boulevards, and no shortage of culture for evening activities; it's because humanity has lived in those areas for far longer and thus been able to focus on the finer things in life. The farther west you go from the old continent, the more spread out, commercial, and barren the cities seem; the final conclusion being a place like bakersfield california or any generic sprawl which has no downtown, no walkways or congregating places, and no culture.
post #34 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord-Barrington View Post

Scottsdale is a terrible place to live unless you are interested in retirees and golf. Portland wouldn't be my first choice but at least they have interesting restaurants and you can move around without spending $500 on gas every month.
As I said, you can tell yourself whatever you want but there are only a handful of cities in the US that can offer enough for someone who has even a passing interest in art, culture, good food, etc.

laugh.gif

So, how often does one indulge their interest in "art?" How does one indulge in it? I ask this as I've found people often misprioritize metrics such as this when discussing locations. Oh, and btw? Funny you riff on Scottsdale as it has a thriving art scene. I can remember being there one time and this whole section was having an open house, at numerous galleries, all serving interesting refreshments. A quick Google yielded this: http://www.scottsdalegalleries.com/ Looks like I didn't show up for anything special but they in fact have it every Thursday. Over 100 galleries.

Again, back to Portland? Not diverse. That's one of my metrics.

Now, don't think I'm saying Scottsdale = Chicago or NYC or anything like that. Also, in many ways a good case can be made Cleveland, Detroit, etc. are shitholes. In fact, in many ways they certainly are. However, they also have redeeming qualities, are near cities with other attractions (Detroit is a few hours from many great cities, such as Chicago and Toronto), and do possess a certain mood you can't get in other places. Getting back to art and culture, Detroit's DIA is fantastic. I used to trudge through two feet of snow to use my student ID to enter for free and eat lunch in the Diego Rivera botanical courtyard. It has several live theatres, including the Hilbury and Bonstelle, both of which I have been to many times. It has this great old warehouse of old and used books called Jonathan King. I loved that place and the finds I'd get there.

I'm just saying folks get all haughty over silly metrics on what a "good life" consists of and what the only good places to live are.
post #35 of 90
Austin might be worth looking into. It has a great music scene and plenty of interesting restaurants and things to do. It never gets too cold and there are always plenty of people out doing outdoorsy things and you get the benefit of it having a major university.
post #36 of 90
Houston is a fantastic place to live.

Everyone that I know who has moved here loves it.

That does not mean everyone that has moved here but those that I know.
post #37 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord-Barrington View Post

I guess that could work if you wanted to be knee deep in coed poontang. If you actually want to do anything else besides bang sorority chicks though, living in Columbus or East Lansing would suck fiercely.
And regarding the Portland/Seattle thing, I would live there but neither would be my first choice. Honestly North American cities I'm open to live in right now are basically Boston, SD, Montreal (current), Toronto, NYC, and that's probably it.

What do you do in your free time that a reasonably sized American town can't cater to? Highly experienced BDSM? Come on man. I know for a fact that a college town can satisfy your basic needs for awhile, they are designed to - and well, they're nicer than the real world too, in many ways.
It's nice to talk mad shit about cities but really, the only thing that will affect the average person's life day to day is the tax rate, the weather, and the people. If you think you have finer taste than the locals in an American locale you will end up buying your shit online, so who cares? I don't know if you're out waiting for Scott Schumann to snap you or what, so I guess that is a possibility, but really, American big town near a city, American city that is not New York - you're getting the same thing.
post #38 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

laugh.gif
So, how often does one indulge their interest in "art?" How does one indulge in it? I ask this as I've found people often misprioritize metrics such as this when discussing locations. Oh, and btw? Funny you riff on Scottsdale as it has a thriving art scene. I can remember being there one time and this whole section was having an open house, at numerous galleries, all serving interesting refreshments. A quick Google yielded this: http://www.scottsdalegalleries.com/ Looks like I didn't show up for anything special but they in fact have it every Thursday. Over 100 galleries.
Again, back to Portland? Not diverse. That's one of my metrics.
Now, don't think I'm saying Scottsdale = Chicago or NYC or anything like that. Also, in many ways a good case can be made Cleveland, Detroit, etc. are shitholes. In fact, in many ways they certainly are. However, they also have redeeming qualities, are near cities with other attractions (Detroit is a few hours from many great cities, such as Chicago and Toronto), and do possess a certain mood you can't get in other places. Getting back to art and culture, Detroit's DIA is fantastic. I used to trudge through two feet of snow to use my student ID to enter for free and eat lunch in the Diego Rivera botanical courtyard. It has several live theatres, including the Hilbury and Bonstelle, both of which I have been to many times. It has this great old warehouse of old and used books called Jonathan King. I loved that place and the finds I'd get there.
I'm just saying folks get all haughty over silly metrics on what a "good life" consists of and what the only good places to live are.

If you like Scottsdale and Detroit, good for you. But both those cities suck and I think most people I know would agree. One is a post-industrial waste zone and the other is a sprawling mess of traffic jams, golf carts, and Olive Gardens.

As I said, you can write paragraphs and paragraphs about how a certain crappy city is "on its way up" but I only plan on living once, so why waste it living in a city that sucks, waiting for it to get good?
post #39 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post

What do you do in your free time that a reasonably sized American town can't cater to? Highly experienced BDSM? Come on man. I know for a fact that a college town can satisfy your basic needs for awhile, they are designed to - and well, they're nicer than the real world too, in many ways.
It's nice to talk mad shit about cities but really, the only thing that will affect the average person's life day to day is the tax rate, the weather, and the people. If you think you have finer taste than the locals in an American locale you will end up buying your shit online, so who cares? I don't know if you're out waiting for Scott Schumann to snap you or what, so I guess that is a possibility, but really, American big town near a city, American city that is not New York - you're getting the same thing.


What do I do on a normal Saturday? I walk around the city, dropping into galleries and cafes and cool little stores, then at night I eat at a nice restaurant and go to a show or a movie. Can I do that in Scottsdale, Kansas City, or Memphis?

No.

People who pretend that all cities are more or less created equal and you just need to make the most of it have never lived in a world class city.
post #40 of 90
That is cute man, but you are talking a lot of poop - Kansas City has one of the finest art galleries in your country, as it so happens.

I don't believe cities are created equal, and so I live in Tokyo. No city in America besides NYC would do it for me at this point, as I've said, and even then, I prefer Tokyo.
post #41 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post

That is cute man, but you are talking a lot of poop - Kansas City has one of the finest art galleries in your country, as it so happens.
I don't believe cities are created equal, and so I live in Tokyo. No city in America besides NYC would do it for me at this point, as I've said, and even then, I prefer Tokyo.

Good for Kansas City. But besides the art museum (which is admittedly fantastic) the only other thing going for that city is its BBQ.

So you're basically confirming what I'm saying?
post #42 of 90
No, I get this image that you think you're some sort of Zoolander'ish man about town sippin on an orange frappaccino in a Jeep when all you really do is hop into Chipotle around 8 after work and grab your usual with extra beans cuz you're going to bed early and it doesn't matter. They have Chipotles in all of the towns you downed, by the way.
post #43 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord-Barrington View Post

What do I do on a normal Saturday? I walk around the city, dropping into galleries and cafes and cool little stores, then at night I eat at a nice restaurant and go to a show or a movie. Can I do that in Scottsdale, Kansas City, or Memphis?
No.
People who pretend that all cities are more or less created equal and you just need to make the most of it have never lived in a world class city.

Yes, because there's only a few places in N. American one can do this. rolleyes.gif

Did you miss the part about the 100 galleries in Scottsdale? Let me guess...these galleries suck too? I don't know the food scene there well but I'm willing to bet if there's all these galleries, there's a food scene. I can tell you we had a fantastic meal at the Phoenician too.

You also failed to answer my questions that were designed to probe your stance a bit. I get it. You're the coolest kid on the block, living with other equally cool kids, in one of the few cities you deem cool enough to live in. Pretty much just want I thought.
post #44 of 90
The thing is, most cities people claim to be "wonderful world class" are merely variants of a type packaged and brought to you by the Rick J. Caruso's of the world. It is silly to claim there are only set amount of "real" cities, but it is not silly to say that New York is different than up and coming Kansas City. It comes down to "whole is greater than the sum of its parts" with these things.
post #45 of 90
another +1 for san diego. You should research the various downtown neighborhoods. I lived there for several years. Downtown has a big city feel without being overwhelming. Public transportation is accessible if that is your thing. lots of active single people, in general.

OB if your slummin icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif


I don't get the slow pace comments, but i guess it depends who/where you spend time.
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