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post #256 of 339
always need vents on jackets.
post #257 of 339
As an owner of 2 10 ply jumpers and the original peacoat I would argue that the jumpers are warmer. Sitting watching football whilst a string wind blows in off the north sea is what I base my opinion on.
post #258 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by sehkelly View Post
 

Interesting. Good to know. 

 

I do enjoy eliminating traditional / vestigial aspects on things, but the vent on a jacket had never occurred to me.

 

Especially on shorter jacket (which ours are) I see your point (though this 2" vent thing I don't like the sound of one bit).

Vents (single or double) make my ass look bigger.

Cary Grant wore ventless jackets for the same reason IMO.

post #259 of 339
Double vents are the best vents.
post #260 of 339
My ass brings the girls to the yard tbh.

Also, vents aren't extraneous if you put your hands in your pockets.
post #261 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyc wid it View Post

Double vents are the best vents.

I concur. Ventless makes me feel like a high schooler wearing it.
post #262 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by JChance View Post

I concur. Ventless makes me feel like a high schooler wearing it.

The most formal of jackets are still ventless, though... Evening suits are traditionally made ventless because the only place you are going to park your butt is in your seat.  

post #263 of 339

My tweed jacket is ventless and I have no problems when I sit down.

I unbutton it.

post #264 of 339
jacket length 29.5 in and below... I'd prefer ventless. 31 inches and up, vents would look nice, but I don't mind ventless. this is on a 6 feet height.
post #265 of 339
Do you guys not put your hands in your pockets?

even on tuxedo jackets, vents are essential for me
post #266 of 339
pockets inaccessible means jacket often buttoned, hence a more formal setting... in which admittedly longer and vented jacket are worn.

It's the Barena-style jackets that I usually wear unbuttoned, therefore access to pockets are easy and vents would be unnecessary.
post #267 of 339
What venting. (Sorry.)

Speaking of vents, we just added one (and only one) to a new development -- a casual SB2 -- at the factory. We have found that the short and very simple SB1 is good for some people, the more traditional trappings of the SB3 are good for others -- and so what better way to satisfy anyone left out than with an SB2.

As well as being the mathematical average of the SB1 and SB3, the SB2 will introduce a few new ideas and motifs we have been working on since the spring. The notch on the collar has been lowered by at least one inch, which seems to change the proportions at the front of the jacket -- or rather, how they appear -- considerably. We are also playing around with stitch-through pockets, softer shoulders, and slightly narrower arm-holes than our jackets have previously had.

Further down the line, once the development is complete, we hope this jacket will be a candidate for the new Hebridean tweed, which as mentioned above ought to go into work next month. They will be sober, I think, but full of texture, and I hope cloth and jacket will go together well.

Paul
Edited by sehkelly - 7/23/14 at 12:15pm
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post #268 of 339

Afternoon all

 

The last of our shipments to Japan left the factory this week, which is good news for many reasons -- especially because it means what we call the "overlap garments" (garments which we sell in Japan and on our website) are as good as finished.

 

The first of are calico-cotton shirts, which are made from a natural ecru cotton, and then garment-dyed by some clever colour-masters in the East Midlands. In true time-honoured garment-dyed tradition, the cloth crumples up a little bit, and you get that nice satisfying crinkled quality at the seams.

 

 

 

The second set of garments are the first things we've made with wool for quite some time. It is a suit -- or rather a three-button jacket and trouser, made with the same lambswool-merino suiting from an old mill in West Yorkshire. It is good winter suiting, being fairly thick, but with a surprisingly good drape and very soft handle (thanks to the merino no doubt).

 

 

 

Horn buttons all round, buggy lining for the trousers and to-the-knee lining for the trouser, and two shades of grey to start with.

 

Oh -- and one vent.

 

Paul


Edited by sehkelly - 8/7/14 at 9:36am
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post #269 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nakedsnake View Post

It was colder than Mars (literally) last winter where I live.

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Throwing my lot in with the ventless crowd although I like B!CD's idea of optional vents for impromptu horseback rides and pocket usage.
post #270 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by notwithit View Post

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B!CD's idea of optional vents for impromptu horseback rides and pocket usage.

Exactly. That detail give the oppertunity to have more relaxed fit, and is one I like very much on my Barbour Bedale.

(One could argue that double vents on a coat is for farmer, and have no place in town. Alas in this day, a gentlemen is forced to tolerate such blatant behavior).
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