or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Scotch Basics?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Scotch Basics? - Page 3

post #31 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick Bateman
They're still boycotting I believe.

I remember a guy I went to school with whose favorite song was "Weed & Hennessy" by Master P. Quite repetitive.
post #32 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad
I tried it [Johnnie Walker Blue Label] a couple of times and was seriously underwhelmed. YMMV, obviously.
I had the same reaction: I thought it lacked depth and that much of the character had been aged out of the components.

Huntsman's description of JW Gold was nearly on the money. I'd add only that it doesn't give you much peat, but it's wonderfully smooth and almost creamy. The problem, though, is that it costs 2/3-3/4 more than Black, but I wouldn't call it 2/3-3/4 better.

Another good blend that I don't see much of anymore is Haig & Haig's Pinch. I think of it as a more round version of JW Black

For those just starting in scotch: steer clear of Islay single malts, at least in the beginning, unless you're a bourbon drinker who really likes Booker's or really spicy ryes. If you want to start with malts, first try MacAllan or Balvenie (age doesn't much matter at first). If you want to start with blends, try JW Gold or Black, or Pinch. If you don't like any of those, you probably won't like most scotch.
post #33 of 43
What's the price differential between Gold and Green? Hi Time Wine in Costa Mesa has JW Blue Label for $139/btl at the moment. That's about as cheap as I've seen it. Picked up a bottle earlier in the evening and am enjoying a glass as we speak.
post #34 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by drizzt3117
What's the price differential between Gold and Green?
Around $10-15, IIRC. Gold usually runs $55-ish; Green, $40-45.
post #35 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrpologuy
I am looking to start drinking some scotch. I am mostly a gin and tonic and beer drinker now but want to try scotch. What are some good brands to try and how do you guys drink it? What are the qualities of a good scotch?

I usually drink The Glenlivet and Glenfiddich but I am sure there are some lesser known brands out there that others can recommend that may be even better.

I usually drink both of them straight up and neat but you can of course cut it with some ice or water if you want. I have even seem some places chill it which I don't like. The increased temp numbs the tastebuds a little and dulls some flavor notes.
post #36 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by romafan
I'm the farthest thing from a Scotch expert, but single malts (which several people here are recommending) are generally thought to be a little more 'inaccessible' for neophytes - an acquired taste, if you will. If you find the single malts unpalettable it might be best to start w/ a blended whisky. Dewars, Johnny Walker Red (or Black), Chivas, J&B, etc. For price performance, I know folks who have nothing but good things to say about Cutty Sark & Crown Royale, but I've never tasted them...

Dewars makes a white label and another more preminum brand (gold label maybe) that I can recommended as a blend for around 35.00 USD.
post #37 of 43
Yes, Dewars has their white label (the most common) as well as their Dewar's 12 Year "special reserve", which I rarely see, among a few others. As far as first single malts, I wholeheartedly agree with those pushing Dalwhinnie. That's one of my two go-to "scotches for non-scotch drinkers". I've turned people on to scotch at my bar who had NEVER had a whiskey drink that didn't involve cola. The other one that I really like for that purpose is Glen Garioch 15, which is rarer to see in bars. It's an East Highland offering, with medium body, but a nice floral bouquet and an almost fruity palate. I get notes of lavender and honeysuckle in it, and it's definitely less smoke-intensive than most other scotches, which tends to make it easier for the neophyte to appreciate. You can add a little water to it, but my favored method is to have two medium ice cubes added. As they melt, they dilute the scotch somewhat, and the cooling that it gets makes it a bit less overpoweringly aromatic. You'll have time to learn to appreciate the nuances of a bouquet when you DON'T feel that your nostril hair is on fire! In any event, welcome one and all to the world of good scotch. It's a beautiful place to be! Incidentally, this is my first post here, so hi there everyone! It's nice to come to a forum that I found somewhat intimidating (I'm less a style afficionado and more someone looking to learn) and realize that I could make a contribution with my knowledge base right away!
post #38 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyto
Around $10-15, IIRC. Gold usually runs $55-ish; Green, $40-45.

Wow. Lucky Bastards. Here, Gold ($145 AU, $110 US) is roughly double the price of Green ($65 / $50)
post #39 of 43
Had some Glenvivet (sp?) 18 last night and it was quite good. $40 a bottle. Amazing price. BTW, Oban 14 seems to be gone from Costco. At least the local one. Any more leads?
post #40 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by sygyzy
Had some Glenvivet (sp?) 18 last night and it was quite good. $40 a bottle. Amazing price.

At that price I hope you got a lot of bottles...Wow. Was this at costco or somewhere else?
post #41 of 43
If you like Glenlivet 18, you need to try Glenlivet's new offering, their 16-year "Nadurra" cask strength scotch. 114-proof, but you'd never realize it from the smoothness of it. I'm generally not a huge fan of Glenlivet, as I feel that they shoot for a very mild product, but this one was really quite nice. Had a lot of complexity and wasn't afraid to be a little daring....not Laphroaig daring, mind you, but still pretty assertive.
post #42 of 43
Back to the original question as to where to start for a neophyte, this might be heresy, but may I suggest Jameson's 12yr? I realize that this is an Irish whiskey, not Scotch, but I find the Irish whiskeys generally lighter on the palate and, as such, a good place to begin. It's also good as an aperitif, where I find Scotch a better bet with cigars or later in the evening.
post #43 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by eg1
Back to the original question as to where to start for a neophyte, this might be heresy, but may I suggest Jameson's 12yr? I realize that this is an Irish whiskey, not Scotch, but I find the Irish whiskeys generally lighter on the palate and, as such, a good place to begin. It's also good as an aperitif, where I find Scotch a better bet with cigars or later in the evening.


Heresy it certainly is not. Jameson's is a great light whiskey, and is definitely good for beginners (or women, heh). 12 yr. is a classic.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Scotch Basics?