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The State of Black Tie: Your Observations - Page 301

post #4501 of 4606

Honestly, I wore a tie to the Sydney Opera House many times and felt overdressed every time. People just don't care anymore.

post #4502 of 4606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Superfluous View Post

Can you wear a funky dinner jacket and bowtie as "blacktie"? Or would it technically only be black tuxedo? Example below: Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

@sebastian mcfox is absolutely right. Just don't.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by crdb View Post
 

After graduation, there's broadly two classes of events where you'll wear black tie: weddings and professional occasions (dinners, conferences, etc.). 

 

 

And, of course, dinner. There is a reason it's called a dinner jacket.

post #4503 of 4606
Quote:
Originally Posted by crdb View Post
 

In some parts of the US, people will wear black tie to the opera. 

 

With the exception of opening night, this is exceedingly rare. In a place like Chicago it's usually business attire. That said, opening night is this Saturday, and I will be wearing a tux.

 

I might also add that people in the nose-bleeds dress in all manner of vulgar attire, often playing on their phones or chewing too loudly on some food they aren't allowed to have in their seats. In the Dress Circle, or the boxes (where I sit) it's quite different. People dress a little better and are definitely better mannered. 

post #4504 of 4606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caustic Man View Post
 

 

With the exception of opening night, this is exceedingly rare. In a place like Chicago it's usually business attire. That said, opening night is this Saturday, and I will be wearing a tux.

 

I might also add that people in the nose-bleeds dress in all manner of vulgar attire, often playing on their phones or chewing too loudly on some food they aren't allowed to have in their seats. In the Dress Circle, or the boxes (where I sit) it's quite different. People dress a little better and are definitely better mannered. 

I live in a smaller city than Chicago and routinely wear a tux to the ballet. Typically it is only for opening night, which is a bit more formal, but I am never the only one and black tie, while not always done well, is represented in numbers that surprise me.

post #4505 of 4606
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdavro23 View Post
 

I live in a smaller city than Chicago and routinely wear a tux to the ballet. Typically it is only for opening night, which is a bit more formal, but I am never the only one and black tie, while not always done well, is represented in numbers that surprise me.


That's interesting. I think I mean the same thing by exceedingly rare that you are describing here. In other words, there are always a handful of men wearing tuxedos whether it is opening night or not, but out of a crowd of several thousand, that is rare. And on opening night nearly every man is in some manner of black-tie.

post #4506 of 4606
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdavro23 View Post
 

I live in a smaller city than Chicago and routinely wear a tux to the ballet. Typically it is only for opening night, which is a bit more formal, but I am never the only one and black tie, while not always done well, is represented in numbers that surprise me.

 

Is opening night referring to the season, or a production? I expect the season, as I was in black tie at the Met earlier this year for opening night of a production, and there weren't many of us.

post #4507 of 4606

I hate to say it, but I think a lot of death of BT in operatic circles has to do with the opera companies.

 

In the last decade, opera from Met to the lowliest, hardscrabble companies has become obsessed with the idea of making itself 'more approachable' and actively recruiting 'new audiences'. This has lead to some surprising successes, but a great deal of god-awful pandering, and to a general lowering of standards in every respect. They are producing, commissioning, and generally promoting operas not for their musical or dramatic quality but for their 'relatability', and trying to lower every possible bar for audience members in an attempt to make everything easy and obvious, from the surtitles to the implicit dress code.

 

My own feeling is that opera would be far better off keeping itself as a cultural high-water mark. and educating people about how to rise to the occasion. Not sure about seeing Erwartung? Here's a primer on Schoenberg, and why he's important. Choosing between a peak and a notch? Sponsor Blacktieguide and watch the level of dress soar. (These are just offhand ideas, mind you, but it would work better than assuring people that jeans are perfectly fine at the Met because everyone at Prototypes was slumming too.)

post #4508 of 4606
Thank heavens for Glyndebourne.
post #4509 of 4606

How are the other 'estate' operas faring relative to Glyndebourne? (It's well beyond that as a venue now, of course, but it's a point of origin.) Better, I'd imagine, than metropolitan companies in standards of dress...

post #4510 of 4606

Does anyone here wear black tie to the symphony?  I just gave my season opener tickets away which was this past weekend, however, I'm planning to use the rest of my tickets. 

post #4511 of 4606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suit of Nettles View Post

How are the other 'estate' operas faring relative to Glyndebourne? (It's well beyond that as a venue now, of course, but it's a point of origin.) Better, I'd imagine, than metropolitan companies in standards of dress...

Not so well, they come and go and Glyndebourne is the only constant high quality country house opera. Though as you say it is hardly that any more.
post #4512 of 4606
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaggedyDandy View Post

Is opening night referring to the season, or a production? I expect the season, as I was in black tie at the Met earlier this year for opening night of a production, and there weren't many of us.

Do you mean a world premier? Generally the first running of an opera for the season is not a call for much pomp. Opening night of the season, however, is a social event and often a very formal one.
post #4513 of 4606
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwlbu View Post

Does anyone here wear black tie to the symphony?  I just gave my season opener tickets away which was this past weekend, however, I'm planning to use the rest of my tickets. 

I consider the symphony to be a much more casual affair. Your opening night might be a black tie affair, but by no means are all of them. For a regular show I usually just throw on an odd jacket and trousers.
post #4514 of 4606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caustic Man View Post


Do you mean a world premier? Generally the first running of an opera for the season is not a call for much pomp. Opening night of the season, however, is a social event and often a very formal one.

 

I was thinking opening night of the season for the venue, i.e. Met, Sydney, COC, etc., vs. the first night of a production within that season.

post #4515 of 4606
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaggedyDandy View Post
 

 

Is opening night referring to the season, or a production? I expect the season, as I was in black tie at the Met earlier this year for opening night of a production, and there weren't many of us.

Production. Admittedly, there was also one guy in shorts, so that stung a bit. Cargo shorts at that, so at least he really went for it, but still...

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