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The State of Black Tie: Your Observations - Page 300

post #4486 of 4600
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caustic Man View Post

That's a valid argument, but it doesn't really touch on what I meant. Conspicuous not in the sense of being flashy or standing out, but in the sense that it is not the time to look like you are trying to be frugal. If you are ever going to look like you are wearing expensive clothes that have no other use than in a formal environment, then this is it.

I agree with this ^ mostly. I think it has more to do with being appropriately dressed. I get what you are saying about things looking cheap, but I've seen plenty of inexpensive rigs look great and a bunch of very expensive ones look terrible.

 

And I will stipulate that to the average person, anyone wearing a decent looking rig looks "expensive".

post #4487 of 4600

While on the subject of black patent leather pumps, just put my pair on and took a picture of them.  They are Allen-Edmonds Ritz, which A-E no longer makes.

Whatever one might think of black patent leather pumps, at least you don't have to worry about them coming untied and wearing black patent leather pumps is much better than those silly twits who wear velvet Albert slippers with their dinner jackets anyplace (except in their own houses).


Also have a pair of black patent leather oxfords with wide silk laces but seldom wear them.

post #4488 of 4600

I think that's right. And besides, "expensive" means different things to different people. I suppose if I had to specify it even more, I'd say that black tie events are places where it is appropriate to display wealth in the sense that you can afford to have items that cost a relatively large sum of money but have a very narrow purpose. What I mean by "large sum" is in the context of the average person. A $300 pair of patent leather opera pumps, for instance. $300 is a lot of money for most people, and to spend it on a pair of shoes you'll wear at most a handful of times is a status statement in itself.

post #4489 of 4600
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdavro23 View Post
 

Some things cannot be unseen...

post #4490 of 4600
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwlbu View Post


Your link was messed up but I was able to get to it. You could possibly get by with those, but generally it is considered that if you're going to wear non-patent oxfords with black tie, it should be a Wholecut or Cap Toe without brogueing. Not a plain toe Oxford.

 Sorry about the link.  So something like this would be better?  http://shoebank.com/FactorySecondInventory.php?STY=5015S&DIM=E&SIZE=100

post #4491 of 4600
Quote:
Originally Posted by the1gofer View Post

 Sorry about the link.  So something like this would be better?  http://shoebank.com/FactorySecondInventory.php?STY=5015S&DIM=E&SIZE=100

Yep!
post #4492 of 4600
I'm still looking for a good black shoe to go with the Brioni evening outfit but also be able to use occasionally with my dark grey 3 piece formal suit... So no patent leather.

What do people with of th C&J Alex model?
post #4493 of 4600
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClassicKerim View Post

I'm still looking for a good black shoe to go with the Brioni evening outfit but also be able to use occasionally with my dark grey 3 piece formal suit... So no patent leather.

What do people with of th C&J Alex model?

I like the Alex for that quite a bit.

I have a poor man's substitute, the Caine from To Boot New York.


post #4494 of 4600
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClassicKerim View Post

I'm still looking for a good black shoe to go with the Brioni evening outfit but also be able to use occasionally with my dark grey 3 piece formal suit... So no patent leather.

What do people with of th C&J Alex model?

C&J Alex is okay. But if money is no object, I'd go with gaziano & girling Sinatra
post #4495 of 4600
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonathanS View Post

C&J Alex is okay. But if money is no object, I'd go with gaziano & girling Sinatra

Just had a look at the G&G Sinatra pair - they're realllly nice but I can not say money is no issue. If it weren't I'd have bought the Brioni goodyear Roma shoes with the suit for an additional £1000 because they were fabulous (although more rounded).

I couldn't find anything I liked in Church's to be honest except the Consulates in the specia treated polished leather.
post #4496 of 4600
Also BackInTheBox, those shoes look like a fine substitute! Very nice
post #4497 of 4600
Can you wear a funky dinner jacket and bowtie as "blacktie"? Or would it technically only be black tuxedo? Example below:
post #4498 of 4600

You can, but whether you should is another question. The answer is no.

post #4499 of 4600
Quote:
Originally Posted by Superfluous View Post

Can you wear a funky dinner jacket and bowtie as "blacktie"? Or would it technically only be black tuxedo? Example below:
 

After graduation, there's broadly two classes of events where you'll wear black tie: weddings and professional occasions (dinners, conferences, etc.). 

 

In the first instance, you do NOT want to stand out. This is your friend's day. Stick to what everybody else is wearing. It's considerate. 

 

In the second instance, what you wear will project a certain personality. In most industries, flashiness can correlate with narcissism and untrustworthiness. If you're selling oil platform engineering services, stick to black, not even midnight blue. There are exceptions, like media or fashion. Even there, the most I have seen is slightly-too-blue "midnight" DB. 

 

Before graduation, particularly in British universities, black tie opportunities are mostly parties where you can wear whatever you like. This is the time to do stupid things like velvet smoking jackets. I still think your example is a little too out there, but a green or burgundy velvet number would not look out of place at an Oxbridge May Ball and would be more comfortable than barathea anyway as the night gets colder (I used to go to 2-4 balls each year and don't remember one, though).

 

In some parts of the US, people will wear black tie to the opera. Aside from perhaps in Vienna and the ROH boxes, I almost never see black tie, although there's always a few. You can do whatever you like then, but if I were to see a jacket like this I'd not have a particularly positive impression of its wearer. Now, a beautifully tailored black or midnight blue DB with hand finished buttonholes, with a rounded front waistcoat, starched shirt front, hand tied bow, patent leather shoes... 

post #4500 of 4600
Quote:
Originally Posted by crdb View Post
 

After graduation, there's broadly two classes of events where you'll wear black tie: weddings and professional occasions (dinners, conferences, etc.). 

 

In the first instance, you do NOT want to stand out. This is your friend's day. Stick to what everybody else is wearing. It's considerate. 

 

In the second instance, what you wear will project a certain personality. In most industries, flashiness can correlate with narcissism and untrustworthiness. If you're selling oil platform engineering services, stick to black, not even midnight blue. There are exceptions, like media or fashion. Even there, the most I have seen is slightly-too-blue "midnight" DB. 

 

Before graduation, particularly in British universities, black tie opportunities are mostly parties where you can wear whatever you like. This is the time to do stupid things like velvet smoking jackets. I still think your example is a little too out there, but a green or burgundy velvet number would not look out of place at an Oxbridge May Ball and would be more comfortable than barathea anyway as the night gets colder (I used to go to 2-4 balls each year and don't remember one, though).

 

In some parts of the US, people will wear black tie to the opera. Aside from perhaps in Vienna and the ROH boxes, I almost never see black tie, although there's always a few. You can do whatever you like then, but if I were to see a jacket like this I'd not have a particularly positive impression of its wearer. Now, a beautifully tailored black or midnight blue DB with hand finished buttonholes, with a rounded front waistcoat, starched shirt front, hand tied bow, patent leather shoes... 

 

Piggybacking off this: I go to the Seattle Opera, which is about as laid-back as an opera can be. I've seen the occasional tux, always standard black. Even here, where hipsters come in wearing hipster jeans and hipster t-shirts, that jacket would look absurd. I recommend against it.

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