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The State of Black Tie: Your Observations - Page 274

post #4096 of 4595
Quote:
Originally Posted by bringusingoodale View Post

I am under 30 (though close to it) perhaps that has something to do with my sentiment of black tie seeming boring.
 

 

I wouldn't think that was it.

post #4097 of 4595

I quite like black tie, I think it is rather elegant. Im 23, so I don't think its your age.  I will say, I am  not a fan of coattails & the dress for royal ascot, but that might be because I have little use for such dress.

post #4098 of 4595


All bespoke. Luckily it still fits after some loosening.
post #4099 of 4595
Quote:
Originally Posted by bringusingoodale View Post

I am under 30 (though close to it) perhaps that has something to do with my sentiment of black tie seeming boring.

and like I said, not to offend anyone, but outside of small circle of clotheshorses and dandy aspirants and fops, no one will care if you aren't wearing "classic" men's black tie ensemble.

I just recently turned 30 myself, so I'm not sure if age has much to do with it. I actually don't mind it being called boring (it kind of is), but pointed out that there's elegance in simplicity which is kind of the point. Most people (not "no one") won't care if you get all the details right, but it still looks good when you do get them right. Also, more people will "notice" that something is not right than "care." It's exhausting to actually care too much about how other people dress, so most people (outside of the occasional snob), even clotheshorses, don't bother. The other thing I think is worth considering is that most of us don't wear black tie nearly often enough to get bored with the look (I wear my dinner jacket 6 times in a good year, probably 3-4 in a more average year.

Also, the whole "[most people] won't care" argument is true to varying degrees for most things in menswear. It's not just black tie where not doing it right may not attract negative attention. I see poor examples of fits across the formality spectrum everyday, but have never seen that as a reason to not take care to do things right.
post #4100 of 4595
Quote:
Originally Posted by bringusingoodale View Post

I am under 30 (though close to it) perhaps that has something to do with my sentiment of black tie seeming boring.

and like I said, not to offend anyone, but outside of small circle of clotheshorses and dandy aspirants and fops, no one will care if you aren't wearing "classic" men's black tie ensemble.

Then in 15 years, your girlfriend will see your prom picture and laugh at how bad you looked because you wanted to stand out and thought that classic black tie was "boring." Theoretically, of course.
post #4101 of 4595
Da Vinci: simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.

When I got married last year (29 at the time), I remember thinking about tinkering with black tie. Then I realized black tie dress code is specific for a reason. Looking at our wedding pictures, I'm glad I stuck to the rules and am happy to have a tux now for whenever the situation requires.
post #4102 of 4595
This was previously posted, but all this talk about trying to stand out in black tie cries out for the video again:

post #4103 of 4595
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayward View Post

This was previously posted, but all this talk about trying to stand out in black tie cries out for the video again Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
:

 


 

Crucially in there, he's worried about the cool men purposely (as opposed to accidentally) flouting the rules of black tie in order to stand out. Not that I've been to tons of black tie events, but it's been my experience that the men going with the equivalent of the "sparkly shirt" he mentions are trying so hard to be cool, that they are definitely not cool. That is, in my opinion, significantly different than those that simply don't know the rules and so break them by mistake. I have infinitely more time for the latter than the former, but that's just me.

post #4104 of 4595
A lot of peacocks are compensating for the lack of a real personality. Dressing in a quirky, unique way does not in and of itself make you a quirky and unique person. Those people might not want to be boring, but they are boring, and wearing crazy clothes does not make up for it.

(There are, of course, peacocks who dress wildly on top of being fun and interesting people. I'm not talking about them.)
post #4105 of 4595
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayward View Post

This was previously posted, but all this talk about trying to stand out in black tie cries out for the video again:

 

 

I hate to burst his bubble, but I think he looks  like a prune - he has notched lapels on his black tie tuxedo.

post #4106 of 4595
And yet he still looks good.
post #4107 of 4595
When you look at things like vintage illustrations and classic movies it seems pretty common for notched lapels. It's probably a rule someone posted on this board a long time ago and everyone took it as fact.
post #4108 of 4595
It's probably from Black Tie Guide.

Spotlight: The Notched Lapel

According to this, it was a trend in the 1920s that quickly died out until the 1950s-60s, which is the tail end of the quote-classic-menswear-unquote period.
post #4109 of 4595
I think peak lapels look much better than notch on a dj, but if the only thing suboptimal is having notch, then the wearer will still look darn good.
post #4110 of 4595
Here's a good example of notch lapels from the '20s:



Nice turnback cuffs, too.
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