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The State of Black Tie: Your Observations - Page 133

post #1981 of 3647
While some may use BTG that way, I don't think that's how it's used here. For example, BTG really emphasises patent for shoes, but most here accept polished calf. In fact, I referenced BTG's shoe recommendations in a post where I was recommending calf.
post #1982 of 3647
Quote:
Originally Posted by culverwood View Post

I am one who thinks that black tie continuously evolves
...conversely, I am not.

That doesn't mean we both can't reference what is, as you said, a fine piece of research.
post #1983 of 3647
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

Blacktieguide.com says:
Quote:
Formal Lace-Up (Oxford)

Although not as formal as the pump, the evening lace-up still boasts an impressive heritage dating back to the turn of the twentieth century. The low-cut oxford derives its elegance from its “closely cropped soles, delicately beveled waist, and glovelike fit” as Dressing the Man so poetically explains. In addition, the ready-to-wear version has an advantage over its slip-on counterpart because of its ability to fit a wider variety of foot shapes and subsequent reduced likelihood of pinching or slipping while dancing.

• Laced shoes must be as simple as possible in order to respect formalwear’s refined minimalism. In this regard, oxfords are the only allowable style; wingtips and brogues should be avoided as they are too similar to daily work shoes and loafers are also much too casual

• plain-toe oxfords are preferable to the extra seam required by cap-toe versions

• the closed-laced balmoral (considered the only true oxford by the British and by American traditionalists) is considered more formal than the open-laced blucher (derby in UK) due to its more streamlined contour

* wholecut models have uppers cut from a single piece of leather and therefore trump standard versions due to the absence of side seams

As I understand it, in the central european tradition, plain toe bluchers are actually considered the most formal shoe, and are worn with black and white tie. Personally I think a nice sleek toed pair like these polished up to a high shine would look smashing with black tie -

post #1984 of 3647
I'm sure they would.
post #1985 of 3647
Quote:
Originally Posted by E,TF View Post

As I understand it, in the central european tradition, plain toe bluchers are actually considered the most formal shoe[...]
I would like to learn more. Do you have a source?
post #1986 of 3647
Quote:
Originally Posted by random-adam View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by E,TF View Post

As I understand it, in the central european tradition, plain toe bluchers are actually considered the most formal shoe[...]
I would like to learn more. Do you have a source?

Unfortunately, my source for this is half remembered stuff from style forum two or three years back. I suspect it came from a member called Fritzl, who was I think Austrian, and very knowledgeable about shoes in general. I'll see if I can find some specific posts.
post #1987 of 3647
Quote:
Originally Posted by E,TF View Post


Unfortunately, my source for this is half remembered stuff from style forum two or three years back. I suspect it came from a member called Fritzl, who was I think Austrian, and very knowledgeable about shoes in general. I'll see if I can find some specific posts.

 

One of the Morning Dress sites I've read mentions Austria, specifically, finding derbies/bluchers common with Morning Dress, and the Black Tie Blog mentioned it for evening wear in a post about the Austrian Ball Season.  So, I've read this about Austria, specifically, on more than one occasion, but not seen it generalized to a broader European region.  Not living in Europe, I can only relay what I've read elsewhere.

post #1988 of 3647
Quote:
Originally Posted by ImTheGroom View Post


One of the Morning Dress sites I've read mentions Austria, specifically, finding derbies/bluchers common with Morning Dress, and the Black Tie Blog mentioned it for evening wear in a post about the Austrian Ball Season.  So, I've read this about Austria, specifically, on more than one occasion, but not seen it generalized to a broader European region.  Not living in Europe, I can only relay what I've read elsewhere.

Yes by Central Europe I meant Austria-Hungary and surrounding sphere of influence.
post #1989 of 3647
Quote:
Originally Posted by E,TF View Post

Yes by Central Europe I meant Austria-Hungary and surrounding sphere of influence.

Ah yes, the old Habsburg stomping grounds . . .
post #1990 of 3647
Quote:
Originally Posted by Midnight Blue View Post

Ah yes, the old Habsburg stomping grounds . . .
Montreal?

post #1991 of 3647
Quote:
Originally Posted by Digmenow View Post


Montreal?
  Hidden for reasons of good taste. (Click to show)

 

ACK!  Get rid of that thing!

 

 

Ahhhhh.  Much better.

post #1992 of 3647
Quote:
Originally Posted by Midnight Blue View Post

Ah yes, the old Habsburg stomping grounds . . .

Quote:
Originally Posted by ImTheGroom View Post

ACK!  Get rid of that thing!




Ahhhhh.  Much better.
Hey! I'm not the one who brought up "Habs"burg! devil.gif

And just to keep the thread from complete derailment, in anticipation of an upcoming black tie GTG in the Washington DC area next month, I got out my black, shawl lapel thrifted rig that was originally sold at a now defunct Baltimore area high end men's clothing retailer (Bernard Hill) and was admiring the "Made in Italy" tag in the coat. Then I noticed the cloth label indicated it was made by 'Mario Zegna'. Obviously one of the lesser lights if the Zegna family. plain.gif
post #1993 of 3647
Quote:
Originally Posted by Digmenow View Post



Hey! I'm not the one who brought up "Habs"burg! devil.gif

And just to keep the thread from complete derailment, in anticipation of an upcoming black tie GTG in the Washington DC area next month, I got out my black, shawl lapel thrifted rig that was originally sold at a now defunct Baltimore area high end men's clothing retailer (Bernard Hill) and was admiring the "Made in Italy" tag in the coat. Then I noticed the cloth label indicated it was made by 'Mario Zegna'. Obviously one of the lesser lights if the Zegna family. plain.gif

 

To continue to get back on track, I just added another event to my December Black Tie schedule - the grand opening of the Hard Rock Casino Vancouver.  Sure, my buddy and I are likely the only ones to show up in Tuxes, but who doesn't want to walk around like Daniel Ocean?

post #1994 of 3647

I'd like to press my bow tie before a party tonight.  Silk, adjustable.  I'm thinking use the silk setting, and put a towel between the tie and the iron.  Yes?  No?  Other?

 

Also, windex on my patent leather?  Saw it in other threads; seems to make sense.  They're these ones, so I assume pretty cheap leather, if it can be even be called that:
http://www.zappos.com/calvin-klein-guilford

post #1995 of 3647
Quote:
Originally Posted by ImTheGroom View Post

I'd like to press my bow tie before a party tonight.  Silk, adjustable.  I'm thinking use the silk setting, and put a towel between the tie and the iron.  Yes?  No?  Other?

Also, windex on my patent leather?  Saw it in other threads; seems to make sense.  They're these ones, so I assume pretty cheap leather, if it can be even be called that:
http://www.zappos.com/calvin-klein-guilford
a thick cotton drill or linen is normally used. Just use the weight of the iron for few second and lift and move to the next section. Do not slide the iron back and fort.
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