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The State of Black Tie: Your Observations - Page 8

post #106 of 3406
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Has a StyleForum Prom been suggested before?

Omg I hope vox asks me to be his date shog[1].gif
post #107 of 3406
FWIW, I too have noticed that the general standard of black tie is fairly low, at least in the US. This isn't all bad, since it makes it very easy to look much better than every one else, just by following the rules. I think that the baby boomers are more culpable than the younger generation. They tend to have money but not to know or care. But I agree that there are probably a significant number of younger guys who would like to do things right. But how to learn?

Besides money, I think the big obstacles are 1) lack of knowledge and role models; and 2) the difficulty of buying decent formal attire, even when one has good intentions. Its just not that easy to find in the US.

I have wondered why there doesn't seem to be a black tie/formal attire thread. I'm not usually a thread starter, but I think it would be great if there were at least one place where received wisdom could be compiled and points of difference could be discussed. Perhaps a senior member could lead us?
post #108 of 3406
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simplicio View Post

FWIW, I too have noticed that the general standard of black tie is fairly low, at least in the US. This isn't all bad, since it makes it very easy to look much better than every one else, just by following the rules. I think that the baby boomers are more culpable than the younger generation. They tend to have money but not to know or care. But I agree that there are probably a significant number of younger guys who would like to do things right. But how to learn?
Besides money, I think the big obstacles are 1) lack of knowledge and role models; and 2) the difficulty of buying decent formal attire, even when one has good intentions. Its just not that easy to find in the US.
I have wondered why there doesn't seem to be a black tie/formal attire thread. I'm not usually a thread starter, but I think it would be great if there were at least one place where received wisdom could be compiled and points of difference could be discussed. Perhaps a senior member could lead us?

We've never needed such a thread because of this website.
post #109 of 3406
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Has a StyleForum Prom been suggested before?
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post

Ahoy.




Given all the metropolitan SF meetups (do I have the spelling correct?) being planned, the time seems to be exactly and precisely right to start thinking about the first StyleForum Cruise.

MC subforum types can dress up in black tie, and SW&D subforum dudes can dress up as sailors.

Body Consciousness subforum members can work out in the extensive ship exercise facilities, and preen for others at the pool. Maybe even fight a little.

B&S members can set up little carts in the main corridor, just like they've always wanted to. F*ck PayPal!

Manton and kwilk can jullienne tubers, and maybe so can SoCal. CESSpool deviants can be tossed overboard.

But sorry: none of you allowed in the penthouse. No exceptions!

There may be cannibalism. There will be no women. There might be some heterosexuality.

Do we need a poll?


-B
post #110 of 3406
We've never needed such a thread because of this website.[/quote]

I had actually thought about mentioning that link. Good point, but there are always things to discuss. This current thread is proof. And it is obvious that even basic stuff can't always be assumed.
post #111 of 3406
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonny58 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Metropolitan Opera FAQ 
What is the dress code?
There is no dress code at the Met. People dress more formally for Galas or openings of new productions, but this is optional. We recommend comfortable clothing appropriate for a professional setting.
We will be seeing La Boheme at the Metropolitan Opera on a Thursday night (not an opening night) and would like to dress appropriately but at the higher end of the scale. I am confused though given the varied thoughts above. confused.gif

I think a dark suit is fine. I did go in the middle of the summer on like a Wednesday night. It was very hot, I was uncomfortable. There were a number of folks that you could tell came right from work, who were wearing dark suits. Some others in bermuda shorts and loud shirts looked stupid. Not just at the opea, but stupid en generale.
post #112 of 3406
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I think a dark suit is fine. I did go in the middle of the summer on like a Wednesday night. It was very hot, I was uncomfortable. There were a number of folks that you could tell came right from work, who were wearing dark suits. Some others in bermuda shorts and loud shirts looked stupid. Not just at the opea, but stupid en generale.

Are you sure? The Met season ends in mid-May. Even the ballet is done by July and there is nothing happening but maintenance in August.
post #113 of 3406
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

Are you sure? The Met season ends in mid-May. Even the ballet is done by July and there is nothing happening but maintenance in August.

Could have been later, I don't remember, but it was humid as fuck.
post #114 of 3406
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeDT View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I'd go on the advice of the Met itself, maybe wear a suit, or sport jacket and trousers. After all you're there to enjoy the show, you're not going to be on TV or photographed by the press,.The performers won't be able to see you anyway, unless you have a front-row seat.
I went to a couple of operas at Covent Garden, London a while back. I'm sure some people even had jeans and t-shirts on, didn't seem to be a problem.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjphillips View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
A sportcoat with trousers (would avoid jeans) or a nice suit should be fine. Don't be afraid to be a bit of dandy if you are inclined because it's hard to stick out there. Weekends are more formal than weekday performances.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeDT View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I'm sure there's a lot of misconceptions about going to the opera, that it's elitist, for the rich, one has to dress to the nines and is strictly black-tie, etc. IMO opera is for everyone, dress standards should never be an obstacle to prevent one from enjoying it.
In fact it's often much cheaper to go and see something like La Bohème than it is go to a Lady Gaga concert.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjphillips View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I agree with you here, and clearly so does the Met - their comments on attire are clearly meant not to scare people off. I must say though, people tend to dress up for the Met and it is a very grand space. It would take quite a secure person to wear shorts there and not feel out of place.
Quote:
Originally Posted by unbelragazzo View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I've been a couple times wearing a suit, which is certainly fine. If I had been wearing SC+trou or been tieless I'd have felt a little underdressed, though not woefully so. No jacket and you're kind of out of place though. At least if you have some style sense, which you clearly do, given that you're here.
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
The two answers below are pretty good
I agree that weekdays can be slightly less formal than weekdays - I don't think I've seen black tie during the week but there is usually a smattering scattered about on Saturday nights. The prevailing dress standard also varies with the seating level (seems less formal in the Dress and Family Circle but people dress there as well) Dress seems a little more formal in the lounges. Apart from varying degrees of formality, there can also be a lot of flamboyant wear, so if you have been looking for an occasion to wear your peacock feather vest and gold lame pants or even a Tom Ford suit, this may be your chance (the Met is the only place I have seen a couple in matching Tom Ford suits).
Special occasions have their own dress code: Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Quote:
The Met will celebrate the premiere of this production with a gala benefit sponsored by Yves Saint Laurent. Join us for a cocktail reception on the balcony and a black-tie dinner on the Mercedes T. Bass Grand Tier before the performance. During the first intermission, enjoy dessert and a champagne toast.
In any case, I wouldn't get hung up on the dress "code". A suit will be fine, as will city coat and tie. So will other things as long as you look like you dressed for the occasion. The Met goes through a lot of trouble to put on a good show and the audience contributes to the atmosphere.
This was very helpful, we'll be in the Orchestra so I'll add points for formality. The peacock feathers and gold lame will probably stay home though.
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I think a dark suit is fine. I did go in the middle of the summer on like a Wednesday night. It was very hot, I was uncomfortable. There were a number of folks that you could tell came right from work, who were wearing dark suits. Some others in bermuda shorts and loud shirts looked stupid. Not just at the opea, but stupid en generale.

Thanks everyone for the insights. I had thought I would wear a SC and trousers but it sounds like a navy suit will not be inappropriate.
post #115 of 3406
Quote:
Originally Posted by unbelragazzo View Post

Are you in DC? Which DC-ers would be ready to stage Occupy Nightlife events wearing tuxes? I stand by my statement that if a few people start doing it, it'll come back. Evening wear FTW.

Minneapolis-St. Paul, although tuxes are more of a St Paul thing.
post #116 of 3406
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pvrhye View Post

quarter lined run the risk of white shirt showing through black jacket?

I suppose it would depend on the external cloth.
post #117 of 3406

Most black tie events here tend to be balls, college events or other similar dinners. Some people clearly make an effort to get things right, and there are people who've gone to so many events over the years that they've found it simpler to just get a tailor to ensure the minimum of effort is required to do things right. Even within this subset, shoes tend to be regular black shoes rather than black tie specific. I must admit I fall into this group myself, and wear well-shined captoes rather than having patents, despite having a couple of nice dinner jackets. You will see some opera slippers around, but few. I do have a pair of dark green suede dancing slippers but they're only wearable to the more frivolous black tie events rather than the more formal ones, so they only get worn very rarely, sadly.

 

Others, esp. new students, tend to have a more bohemian approach to black tie, and who can blame them really? At the end of the evening, their clothes will be sweaty and wine-stained anyway... at least, one hopes it's just wine... :)

post #118 of 3406
The "no notch lapel" rule always amused me. It's one of those rules that some obsessive self-appointed style maven made up at some point and then has been repeated ad-nauseum like it's some sort of black tie decree from god. I prefer peaks, but notches are fine in an otherwise well-put-together tux.
post #119 of 3406
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by run23 View Post

The "no notch lapel" rule always amused me. It's one of those rules that some obsessive self-appointed style maven made up at some point and then has been repeated ad-nauseum like it's some sort of black tie decree from god. I prefer peaks, but notches are fine in an otherwise well-put-together tux.

Notch lapels do not by themselves doom a dinner jacket, but they are typically correspondent with other details that do. Most notch lapel jackets I've seen have been two- or three-buttoned, which is a deal breaker in my book. They also typically come with a vented rear. By itself vents are no big deal, but when combined with the rest, it leaves you with what looks exactly like a regular business suit in black.
post #120 of 3406
Quote:
Originally Posted by run23 View Post

The "no notch lapel" rule always amused me. It's one of those rules that some obsessive self-appointed style maven made up at some point and then has been repeated ad-nauseum like it's some sort of black tie decree from god. I prefer peaks, but notches are fine in an otherwise well-put-together tux.

I agree that it's a little silly, but the rule is (I believe) a result of the notch lapel making the transition from the more casual lounge suit. It would be like having a "no sweat pants" rule; we don't really need to make the rule, because we all recognize that sweat pants are too casual for a tux. At some point, enough people didn't realize that the notch was too casual for semi-formal, and the "rule" was born.

Hopefully we never need the "no sweat pants" rule.
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