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The State of Black Tie: Your Observations - Page 70

post #1036 of 3647
Correct me if I'm wrong, but my understanding is that velvet slippers with formal attire are appropriate only when the event is at one's own home. As in, you are the host and the party is at your house.
Quote:
Originally Posted by musicmax View Post

Black velvet slippers, sometimes called "Prince Albert Slippers" are a historically-proper alternative to pumps and patent oxfords. There's a famous picture of Cary Grant, sitting cross-legged in a tux with black penny loafers, several pages back in this thread - search for Cary Grant and you'll find it. A well-polished black plain captoe (i.e. AE Park Avenue) or wholecut would likely suffice as well.
post #1037 of 3647
Quote:
Originally Posted by EriQ009 View Post

Correct me if I'm wrong, but my understanding is that velvet slippers with formal attire are appropriate only when the event is at one's own home. As in, you are the host and the party is at your house.

That is the preferred environment; I read an "I don't care if I break the rules" air in the OP's query. The robustness of the slipper's sole will dictate its suitability to domestic or public use.
post #1038 of 3647
Just another example of something that was once de rigeur and has since fallen by the wayside. Whereas men used to don black tie or white-tie simply because it was after 6, one now seemingly requires particular occasion or strict commandment.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Well, I cannot speak to other's social circumstances, but I will say that there's no way this makes universal sense. Of the dozen or so weddings I've been to over the past few years, most have been at night, and in no instance did anyone wear black tie unless instructed to.
post #1039 of 3647
Quote:
Originally Posted by EriQ009 View Post

Whereas men used to don black tie or white-tie simply because it was after 6, one now seemingly requires particular occasion or strict commandment.

post #1040 of 3647
Quote:
Originally Posted by EriQ009 View Post

Correct me if I'm wrong, but my understanding is that velvet slippers with formal attire are appropriate only when the event is at one's own home. As in, you are the host and the party is at your house.

I think even "the rules" allow also for an event at one's club. But it's definitely a casualification, intended for a more familiar environment.
post #1041 of 3647
Quote:
Originally Posted by musicmax View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by EriQ009 View Post

Correct me if I'm wrong, but my understanding is that velvet slippers with formal attire are appropriate only when the event is at one's own home. As in, you are the host and the party is at your house.

That is the preferred environment; I read an "I don't care if I break the rules" air in the OP's query. The robustness of the slipper's sole will dictate its suitability to domestic or public use.




Perhaps you are thinking of the velvet smoking jacket (and not the velvet dinner ditto), which is only accepted in one's home or club - the Albert slipper, with the above proviso, is ok outside these locations. bigstar[1].gif
post #1042 of 3647
Quote:
Originally Posted by Butler View Post

Perhaps you are thinking of the velvet smoking jacket (and not the velvet dinner ditto), which is only accepted in one's home or club - the Albert slipper, with the above proviso, is ok outside these locations. bigstar[1].gif

FWIW, BTG says only for private events:

http://www.blacktieguide.com/Classic/Classic_Alternatives.htm
Quote:

Footwear

The classic alternative in black-tie footwear is the elegant evening slipper. Also known as the Prince Albert slipper, this soigné accent is made of velvet with leather soles and features a grosgrain bow or a motif or the wearer’s initials embroidered in gold. These slippers share the same dark colors as the smoking jacket with which they make a perfect pairing. Like the smoking jacket, they are appropriate only for private occasions.

Formal hose can have a clock design that is either self-colored or of a contrasting color to match another accessory. However, the latter option should be used with discretion.
post #1043 of 3647
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moloch38 View Post




Did anyone notice President Obama's "White Tie"?  Two-Button, Notched Lapel, Cumberbund? The list goes on.

I don't think Obama is attempting to wear "white tie" here... He is simply wearing a white tie in otherwise basic black tie / "formal" ensemble. I doubt any of the invitations stipulated white tie

If you have a tuxedo, you can probably safely wear it to any evening wedding regardless of what the invite says (unless the invite specifically says "no black tie" or something like that). People appreciate tuxedos at social events.
post #1044 of 3647
Thread Starter 
Who can say what Obama is attempting do in that getup?
post #1045 of 3647
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Who can say what Obama is attempting do in that getup?

It had a center vent too confused.gif
post #1046 of 3647
Quote:
Originally Posted by Butler View Post

Correct form (to-day):

You specify the correct dress code for the occasion (day/night etc.) and include a voucher to the local rental place for a free rental (of course the rental place are instructed to only supply correct attire, in case of guests potential requests for coloured bows etc.)

One includes the cost in the overall wedding budget.

bigstar[1].gif

 

Uh, it is not proper form to indicate a dress code on a formal invitation for anything other than a costume ball or the like.

 

Informally, you can do as you wish however.

 

Guests should know proper attire based on the time of day. It is a sad testimony about our culture that your guests may not understand what is correct.

post #1047 of 3647
About ten years ago I was working at a major Park Avenue wedding. It was Black Tie Stipulated. Every male guest was in reasonable to flawless Black Tie. Except there was one male guest brought along as a date, and I hate to say this...but...he was clearly not of the social class of the other people invited. Frankly, he was probably not even close to the social status of most of the waiters. He was wearing a cheap, tan, poorly-fitting three-piece suit and OH BOY did he stand out like a sore thumb and you could just sense how uncomfortable he was.
post #1048 of 3647
^ That guy was one of the presenters at the James Beard Awards last year. But he ditched the vest for that event.
post #1049 of 3647
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by recondite View Post

Uh, it is not proper form to indicate a dress code on a formal invitation for anything other than a costume ball or the like.

Informally, you can do as you wish however.

Guests should know proper attire based on the time of day. It is a sad testimony about our culture that your guests may not understand what is correct.

I don't think this is true in the U.S.

As for Europe? Well, get back to me when you turnaround your socialist decay. smile.gif

Actually, now that I think about it, the invitation to Rubinacci's 10-year anniversary party at the Italian embassy in London stipulated a dress code. But maybe that was for the benefit of his unruly American clients.
post #1050 of 3647
Quote:
Originally Posted by recondite View Post

Uh, it is not proper form to indicate a dress code on a formal invitation for anything other than a costume ball or the like.

Informally, you can do as you wish however.

Guests should know proper attire based on the time of day. It is a sad testimony about our culture that your guests may not understand what is correct.

In the US, the mason jar is the ne plus ultra of wedding decor. This is perfectly acceptable wedding dress:
Warning: Can't be unseen! (Click to show)


It's may be a sad testimony about our culture, but it's the reality. There's no such thing as a standard, cultural dress code anymore except for in business settings. (Can't speak to other cultures.)
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