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Post your photography skills! (self-gloss) - Page 235

post #3511 of 4186
nice find TOG!

NOBD, nice, was that first photo of frozen ice?? I'm surprised it's still holding on that one piece.

I got a Canon g2 today, yeah it's old but has a f2 (wide)-f2.5 (long) lens and manual controls so I'll use it until I get my new one (and it was only 30 bucks)
post #3512 of 4186
Thx, IC. All of them are ice.
post #3513 of 4186
Rocking my 4 MP hard lol It's got pretty decent DoF for such a small sensor though...





post #3514 of 4186
Nice ice C, reminded me of one I took two years ago:

UdU1M.jpg

Not that it's a particular interesting photo, but as an exercice in composition, which of the following crops works best for you guys?

Crops (Click to show)

Original 4:3, uncropped:

dxaCA.jpg


Post opened with a 4:3 crop, pic below is also 4:3 but tighter yet:

IrRJj.jpg


Square A:

lMpzF.jpg


Square B:

f9KV0.jpg


4:3, portrait orientation:

UTXae.jpg


Crops aside, the photo is SOOC, Canon S90.
post #3515 of 4186
The whole depth of field thing with different sensor sizes is kind of weird. Thinking in equivalent values tends to sort of keep things in perspective.
post #3516 of 4186
Kaplan 4:3 one seems best to me.

Crane, isn't if it's a f2 it takes in the same amount of light but just different DoF? I'm not entirely sure why this is but it's something to do with larger sensor means more DoF
post #3517 of 4186
Kaplan, I like square A and portrait 4:3
post #3518 of 4186
Quote:
Originally Posted by il ciclista View Post

Kaplan 4:3 one seems best to me.
Crane, isn't if it's a f2 it takes in the same amount of light but just different DoF? I'm not entirely sure why this is but it's something to do with larger sensor means more DoF

Yes the amount of light stays the same but DOF changes. It revolves around field of view and how you compare the images. It can be deeper, shallower or the same. The easiest way to not go nuts over this is don't worry about the actual focal length of the lens. Worry about the effective focal length on anything smaller than a full frame and all the confusion goes away. If you crop a full frame image to match the field of view of an APS-C image the DOF is exactly the same as long as the distance from subject does not change. If you match what you see in an image by changing distance to subject then the smaller sensor has a deeper DOF. Of course none of this matters once you get past the hyperfocal distance of both cameras.
post #3519 of 4186
That's what I thought because at 35mm On my d7k i could get roughly the amount from my 50 on my 5d
post #3520 of 4186
It's exactly as Crane explains.

35mm fullframe (in German it's more correctly Kleinbild which means "small picture", today it seems huge but back in Medium Format times it was a lackluster but convenient and cheap format) is typically the reference point to which most people compare the crop factor of other formats. It's only affecting field of view, focal length always stays the same.

Basically it's like this; if you want to keep the same field of view and the same depth of field, you would need the following lenses for the different sensors:


This shows that equivalent lenses to 50mm f/1 on Leica fullframe or a 80mm f/1.9 on Mamiya medium format are just not available for the smaller formats like a 19x14mm sensor compact like the G1x or even mFT (which has an actually smaller sensor than the G1x). On the other side everyone and his dog has a 50mm f/1.8 for his SLR or a 80mm f/2.8 for his 645 or 6x6 medium format.

You could emulate the effect of the smaller sensor by just shooting with the big cam and cropping the rest away. If you think of a Nikon D700, you wouldn't expect shallow DoF when shooting a 25mm f/1.4 from 3 meter away.



Light gathering and ISO capabilities are fixed though. f/1.8 is f/1.8 for that purpose, no matter what camera. Sometimes the big sensor can be a curse therefore. While you conveniently shoot your Olympus OM-D at 20mm f/1.7 and 1/100s you would already have to shoot an EOS 5D at 40mm f/3.5 and 1/25s for an artistically identical picture with the same angle of view and DoF. You wouldn't be able to handhold the EOS at that speed though.
post #3521 of 4186
Speaking of composition, this is an awesome video by Scott Kelby if you have an hour to spare...

http://www.petapixel.com/2012/06/08/how-to-crush-the-composition/
post #3522 of 4186
nice post Szeph, I knew it was something like that... how it takes double on the mFT for instance to replicate that of a fullframe I just wasn't sure why. I just accepted the science for what it was and worked within those limitations lol

That's a good point about being able to shoot the panny 20 1.7 at a good speed and the full frame at a slower one.I guess each camera would have it's place for need of shooting then. (there doesn't seem to be a "do all" camera in this respect.)
post #3523 of 4186
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOBD View Post

Nice, IC. Yours?
Nice snail pic, TOG. I don't care for the tricks.

Yeah, he is definitely my offspring. Goes hard until he can't go any more and just passes out.
Quote:
Originally Posted by il ciclista View Post

Rocking my 4 MP hard lol It's got pretty decent DoF for such a small sensor though...



I love the sidewalk chalk image. The colors are fantastic here.
post #3524 of 4186
Anyone mess with Ilford SFX?
post #3525 of 4186
Quote:
Originally Posted by IrateCustomer View Post

Yeah, he is definitely my offspring. Goes hard until he can't go any more and just passes out.

Boys are a bit stupid by nature, aren't they? smile.gif
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