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Post your photography skills! (self-gloss) - Page 200

post #2986 of 4183
Nice shot--when the exposure and focus are dead-on, the 160 paints some incredible skin tones. Any feedback for me?
post #2987 of 4183
Flipping through your Flickr. Your film shots are gorgeous.
post #2988 of 4183
More Portra 160. Didn't like this so much when I first processed it, but it's growing on me:

7782427526_7c76f2f7b3_b.jpg
2012_0812_1_22.jpg by mafoofan, on Flickr
post #2989 of 4183
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Nice shot--when the exposure and focus are dead-on, the 160 paints some incredible skin tones. Any feedback for me?

Thanks. I still use film for specific types of shoots or gallery displays for that very reason.

You could slightly overexpose the shot a bit. With film, if in doubt, overexpose which is the opposite of what you do with digital. Another way would be when you compose the shot meter the dark and light areas of the image. Pick an exposure level that's somewhere in the middle. Once you get used to doing this you can bias the image exposure to your liking. Other than that just take your time and practice. Keeping a notebook helps as well.

Shooting film is a dying art and it's nice to see more people going back to it.
post #2990 of 4183
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Flipping through your Flickr. Your film shots are gorgeous.

Thanks Foo, this is one of my favorite pics. nothing special just a nice relaxed impromptu portrait. This one was done with Ektar which I usually use for landscapes and sunsets. Portra is my people film of choice.

5884308296_bfffe80a85_z.jpg
Paul by DYSong Photography, on Flickr
post #2991 of 4183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post

Thanks. I still use film for specific types of shoots or gallery displays for that very reason.
You could slightly overexpose the shot a bit. With film, if in doubt, overexpose which is the opposite of what you do with digital. Another way would be when you compose the shot meter the dark and light areas of the image. Pick an exposure level that's somewhere in the middle. Once you get used to doing this you can bias the image exposure to your liking. Other than that just take your time and practice. Keeping a notebook helps as well.
Shooting film is a dying art and it's nice to see more people going back to it.

I think my mistake was purposefully underexposing. That works well with Portra 400, but I shouldn't have assumed the same for the slower speed. I was shooting at 200 with the Portra 160 and erring on the side of slight underexposure as according to my light meter.

I'll by another roll and shoot at 100 or box speed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post

Thanks Foo, this is one of my favorite pics. nothing special just a nice relaxed impromptu portrait. This one was done with Ektar which I usually use for landscapes and sunsets. Portra is my people film of choice.
5884308296_bfffe80a85_z.jpg
Paul by DYSong Photography, on Flickr

Nice. I think I will stick to Portra all-around, just because I'd really like to learn one film.
post #2992 of 4183
OneFilm™
post #2993 of 4183
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

OneFilm™

Yessir. OneLens, too.

However, unlike the OneShoe, this approach is fairly typical from my understanding.
post #2994 of 4183
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Yessir. OneLens, too.
However, unlike the OneShoe, this approach is fairly typical from my understanding.

It's a good way to learn for sure. I'm notorious for going light. Most of the time it's a camera with one lens and a speed light. Now that doesn't mean I haven't drug around a bunch of other stuff as well. Sometimes the shoot gets complicated so more gear is required to pull it off.
post #2995 of 4183
From your flickr, looks like 50mm 1.4? You shoot wide open much?
post #2996 of 4183
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

OneFilm™

Yessir. OneLens, too.

However, unlike the OneShoe, this approach is fairly typical from my understanding.

My children are my main subject, so I need that zoom. The refs tend to get upset when I get on the field to compose a shot with my 50mm. biggrin.gif
post #2997 of 4183
Quote:
Originally Posted by shoreman1782 View Post

From your flickr, looks like 50mm 1.4? You shoot wide open much?

No, most of what you see was also an exercise in shallow DOF. As usual specific, settings are subject to what I'm trying to capture and how I want to capture it.
post #2998 of 4183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post

It's a good way to learn for sure. I'm notorious for going light. Most of the time it's a camera with one lens and a speed light. Now that doesn't mean I haven't drug around a bunch of other stuff as well. Sometimes the shoot gets complicated so more gear is required to pull it off.

I figure, Henri Cartier-Bresson only shot with his 50mm (occasionally a 35mm). I don't want to be one of those guys lugging a backpack around on vacation, either. So far, the 50mm has proven exceptionally adaptable. Maybe one day I will get a 35mm and 90mm to fill out my kit, but I'm in no rush.
Quote:
Originally Posted by shoreman1782 View Post

From your flickr, looks like 50mm 1.4? You shoot wide open much?

Yeah, quite a bit actually. The extra speed is useful when you don't have (or want to use) a flash. Most of my portraits are taken wide open. In many cases, the narrower depth of field is an added bonus.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

My children are my main subject, so I need that zoom. The refs tend to get upset when I get on the field to compose a shot with my 50mm. biggrin.gif

My camera doesn't speak zoom. frown.gif
post #2999 of 4183
You have a Leica, right? That's some manly shit, Foo. I ain't ready.
post #3000 of 4183
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

You have a Leica, right? That's some manly shit, Foo. I ain't ready.

You'd be surprised how easy it is to shoot. I find my all-auto Panasonic point-and-shoot far more vexing. I have to sort through half a dozen menus to get to the setting I want to adjust, and even then I have no idea what else the camera is doing behind the curtains. With my Leica, there are only four fundamental settings to play with: ISO, aperture, shutter speed, and focus. I know exactly what's what.

The result is that I take fewer overall shots, but get better quality images and far more keepers.
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