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What to do when stuck in a dead end job? - Page 2

post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackhood View Post

Also, if you're not getting any results from your C.V application then try mixing it up. If you're really serious about getting a new job then just go batshit-crazy with your methods. Some ideas:
Hire a billboard with your face on it saying "Can you hire this man?"
Make "Wanted" posters, with a picture of you and something along the lines "Do you have a need for a create, determined [BLANK CAREER]?"
Print out your CV and put it under the wind shield wiper of any luxury car you see.
Create a video website a la Barney Stinson
Basically, being stuck in a job is a choice. You could dedicate like $1,000 to yours search and have a new job in 6 weeks. If you don't have that money, then make your life more fun until you've saved it up.

I totally disagree with this. Can it work in some weird instance? Sure - maybe someone will offer you a job doing sales door to door. Getting a real career like that? No way.

To me, it would just imply the person is immature/crazy. But I guess I used to believe in those types of silly things when I was in my early 20s also.
post #17 of 25
You can take a community college course, they have are available at night time or weekends etc. the cost is usually nominal, but that would help with python if available.
post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by CYstyle View Post

You can take a community college course, they have are available at night time or weekends etc. the cost is usually nominal, but that would help with python if available.

What exactly do they need python for?

I've never done anything super in depth with it (it wasn't something I used in school), but I like python for the fact that you can get a working program to solve your problem really fast by using available help docs/stack overflow/premade libraries. I use it at work when I can...its the built in scripting language for ArcGIS so for mapping related tasks it is handy to know and it means that other people in the office besides me have a python interpreter already installed so they can run your scripts.
Other than running scripts on geographic data, I've used it for various things like scraping data from websites, manipulating PDFs, generating hundreds of macro calls to go into a SAS program. All 1-off projects where execution time isn't the problem. When you are only going to run something a few times before never needing it again, it is much better to be able to write it super fast and be able to quickly verify that there are no weird bugs. Sure I could probably write something in C that ran twice as fast but it would take me 4 times longer to write it and make sure there were no mystery bugs (doesn't help that I haven't used it in years).

Certainly if I saw python on a resume, it would pull someone ahead of someone who met the standard qualifications for the job but didn't have some scripting experience...but I definitely only use it as a utility language. I don't think there is any room at all in our company for a full time python programmer, but someone with other skills can often shoehorn in some python script to cut a job down from 3 people working for an entire day to one person working for 2 hours.
post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

What exactly do they need python for?

Python is used in the next gen risk and trading platform for JPM(I think) and BAML. These are both rewrites of a Goldman legacy system called SecDB, which uses a proprietary scripting language.

Right now, BAML is basically desperate for Python programmers and python-competent analysts.
post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flambeur View Post

I totally disagree with this. Can it work in some weird instance? Sure - maybe someone will offer you a job doing sales door to door. Getting a real career like that? No way.
To me, it would just imply the person is immature/crazy. But I guess I used to believe in those types of silly things when I was in my early 20s also.

Admittedly I'm in Marketing which is an inherently creative career but here are some examples of it working:

Example 1
Example 2
Example 3
Example 4
Example 5
Example 5


Naturally, a financial advisor might not have the same impact, but making yourself famous in your area also pays dividends in other ways. Pull a dumb stunt like the billboard thing. Have a friend call local radio and news stations claiming to be your agent organising interviews (or just do it yourself). 5 or 6 news slots on which you can come across as a hierable person? Well worth that cash.

Once you have your job, set yourself up as a speaker at events; speak at networking events, local schools, make your life a damn sight more interesting.

I'm sure you will put all this down to being a "dumb kid" but there is a reason that there are dumb kids out there earning $100K + simply because they aren't tied to conventions.
post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackhood View Post

Admittedly I'm in Marketing which is an inherently creative career but here are some examples of it working:
Example 1
Example 2
Example 3
Example 4
Example 5
Example 5
Naturally, a financial advisor might not have the same impact, but making yourself famous in your area also pays dividends in other ways. Pull a dumb stunt like the billboard thing. Have a friend call local radio and news stations claiming to be your agent organising interviews (or just do it yourself). 5 or 6 news slots on which you can come across as a hierable person? Well worth that cash.
Once you have your job, set yourself up as a speaker at events; speak at networking events, local schools, make your life a damn sight more interesting.
I'm sure you will put all this down to being a "dumb kid" but there is a reason that there are dumb kids out there earning $100K + simply because they aren't tied to conventions.

...and there are plenty of kids who end up humiliated with their dreams crushed.. or become the next Alexey Vayner
post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flambeur View Post

...and there are plenty of kids who end up humiliated with their dreams crushed.. or become the next Alexey Vayner

Yeah, I think this isn't a good idea in the longterm. It makes you look unprofessional and unstable and even if it lands you a job now, future employers may be less keen on your hijinks.

I have to say that you are a "brand" but in the workaday world, you more or less are. Nowadays with the proliferation of social media, your "brand" is more easily identifiable than ever before so make sure you make yourself seem serious, collegial and hard working. Not desperate and gimmicky.
post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackhood View Post

Admittedly I'm in Marketing which is an inherently creative career but here are some examples of it working:
Example 1
Example 2
Example 3
Example 4
Example 5
Example 5
Naturally, a financial advisor might not have the same impact, but making yourself famous in your area also pays dividends in other ways. Pull a dumb stunt like the billboard thing. Have a friend call local radio and news stations claiming to be your agent organising interviews (or just do it yourself). 5 or 6 news slots on which you can come across as a hierable person? Well worth that cash.
Once you have your job, set yourself up as a speaker at events; speak at networking events, local schools, make your life a damn sight more interesting.
I'm sure you will put all this down to being a "dumb kid" but there is a reason that there are dumb kids out there earning $100K + simply because they aren't tied to conventions.

Unconventional is 1 thing but it should be done with a right dose of professionalism.

The kind of image you need to project while breaking conventions is that of an overlooked talent with strong goals and ambition. Not so much of Alexey Vayner(Seriously, what was he trying to prove?)

To OP,

Ever considered being self-employed? Since you major in economics, surely you can branch out into doing investments for yourself assuming you have some personal funds.

Or start by refreshing your knowledge in economics, start blogs and writing articles with your analysis or outlook of the economy in general. All these can open paths maybe not immediately but in the near future.


Good luck.
post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by thenanyu View Post

Python is used in the next gen risk and trading platform for JPM(I think) and BAML. These are both rewrites of a Goldman legacy system called SecDB, which uses a proprietary scripting language.
Right now, BAML is basically desperate for Python programmers and python-competent analysts.

Interesting, thanks. I thought a lot of those legacy systems used some sort of lisp-like dialect to do things.

do these guys also work ibank analyst hours?
post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

Interesting, thanks. I thought a lot of those legacy systems used some sort of lisp-like dialect to do things.
do these guys also work ibank analyst hours?

Yeah, the older systems use LISP-like languages, but the newer systems they are rolling out all use python, and there are massive efforts underway to standardize on the new systems.

Hours-wise, it really depends. Since the platforms span across every business of the bank, hours can vary depending on the job, as can salaries.
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