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I want a milk tie!

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
So any forum members going to make one from milk fabric?

http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/2011/11/15/wear-milk-designer-uses-textile-made-from-100-percent-cow-juice/

I guess if you're tired of your tie, you can eat it instead of donating it to goodwill. biggrin.gif
post #2 of 12
Quote:
She also notes that only a half gallon of water is needed to produce 2 pounds of fabric, or enough to make several standard dresses. By comparison, the same amount of cotton requires more than 10,000 liters of water.

facepalm.gif

Would it kill the author to keep the units consistent? It's a two sentence paragraph. Either it's two liters for the milk or 2,500 gallons for the cotton.


As for the actual substance, neat. An artificial protein fiber is a pretty cool thing, especially how you can control the gauge of the fiber. Fibers as fine as the best cashmere or as thick and strong as the heaviest wools. It'll be interesting to see the economics of this develop, if this stuff can be cost effective at larger scales, it could be revolutionary.
post #3 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post

Quote:
She also notes that only a half gallon of water is needed to produce 2 pounds of fabric, or enough to make several standard dresses. By comparison, the same amount of cotton requires more than 10,000 liters of water.
facepalm.gif
Would it kill the author to keep the units consistent? It's a two sentence paragraph. Either it's two liters for the milk or 2,500 gallons for the cotton.
As for the actual substance, neat. An artificial protein fiber is a pretty cool thing, especially how you can control the gauge of the fiber. Fibers as fine as the best cashmere or as thick and strong as the heaviest wools. It'll be interesting to see the economics of this develop, if this stuff can be cost effective at larger scales, it could be revolutionary.

Or just stop using archaic units like pound and gallon. Perhaps the author is from Burma.
post #4 of 12
I wonder how much a spider-silk tie would cost...
post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Naka View Post

I wonder how much a spider-silk tie would cost...

Considering that there is only one piece of spider silk cloth in the world... probably too much for any of us here.
post #6 of 12
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Naka View Post

I wonder how much a spider-silk tie would cost...

Interestingly Nicholas Storey and I have been working - very slowly on just such a project for a couple of years. He is in South America and has found some interesting spiders which he is trying to collect the silk from.

We would then probably spin the silk into fabric here in Thailand on our fram as reeling may be too difficult, and then make ties.

The cost of the ties will be very high.
post #8 of 12
Is a pearl necklace the equivalent of a milk tie?
post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Grant View Post

Is a pearl necklace the equivalent of a milk tie?

rotflmao.gif
post #10 of 12
Daffy's had a bunch of sweaters made out of this fabric. Felt like a soft thin cotton. The brand was, get this, Milk.
post #11 of 12
http://shine.yahoo.com/fashion/why-peta-upset-over-gold-cape-144100799.html

Gist:

You're looking at the largest item of clothing ever made from spider silk. This gold cape was a four-year project involving more than one million spiders. And not just any spiders. These guys are a rare species from Madagascar with golden filaments that produce the blindingly saffron product you see here.

Screenshot2012-01-21at44815AM.png

This fashion statement is currently on display at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London. Actually, spider silk is a hot commodity in the art world right now. Last year, another, slightly less ambitious spider silk garment -- an 11-foot scarf -- was exhibited in museums from New York to London.

Part of the fascination with the process comes from the craftsmanship. The scarf alone required a commitment from 70 people with the ability to work on machinery not really employed since the 19th century in France. But Madagascar spider silk also has some otherworldly properties. For instance, it's virtually weightless so it doesn't feel like anything. It's as close as you'll get to an invisibility cloak at this point. Amazingly, the material is also stronger than Kevlar. There's actually been research into developing a synthetic version for the military.
post #12 of 12
...
Edited by jrd617 - 1/21/12 at 2:46am
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