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Top Chef Texas - Page 7

post #91 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post

No, I think the general level of cooking was higher. Felt like there were less "produced" moments and more pure cooking.
I will give season 6 this though, the rewards for winning challenges were absolutely fucking sick. When Kevin (IIRC) won the chance to compete for the Bocuse d'Or USA.... that's just incredible.

I'd forgotten about that! He backed out, though, right?

BTW, I've meant to ask you: have you seen the new Chef Hunter show on Food Network? I kind of like it. I'm a sucker for vocational training reality TV, but the show offers a pretty interesting perspective.
post #92 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by erictheobscure View Post

I'd forgotten about that! He backed out, though, right?
BTW, I've meant to ask you: have you seen the new Chef Hunter show on Food Network? I kind of like it. I'm a sucker for vocational training reality TV, but the show offers a pretty interesting perspective.

Yeah, my gf watches it while I'm browsing the intertubes and so I end up seeing bits and snippets. I find it relatively enjoyable. I think it's a good thing for food TV overall, in that it gives a much more "real" (although not completely real) view of what life as a cook/chef is actually like. And it's also good because it shows a few interesting and important things:
1) How incredibly important food cost is.... seems like more often than not, the decision comes down to this
2) How raw talent and ability truly don't mean a damn thing if you can't actually do the 14 hour day and run a kitchen well. You could be the best "home chef" in the world, the best cook in your little social circle, the one person that everybody says "omg so and so should open a restaurant/go to culinary school/ do catering events, but if you cant do that perfect dish 100 times in a 5 hour dinner service 6 days a week, you're basically worthless in this industry.
3) How ridiculously hard it is to walk into a new kitchen and immediately begin working in it, let alone running it. You don't know the dishes, and even if you do, you don't know the pickups, the timing, the pacing of courses, etc etc.
post #93 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post

Yeah, my gf watches it while I'm browsing the intertubes and so I end up seeing bits and snippets. I find it relatively enjoyable. I think it's a good thing for food TV overall, in that it gives a much more "real" (although not completely real) view of what life as a cook/chef is actually like. And it's also good because it shows a few interesting and important things:
1) How incredibly important food cost is.... seems like more often than not, the decision comes down to this
2) How raw talent and ability truly don't mean a damn thing if you can't actually do the 14 hour day and run a kitchen well. You could be the best "home chef" in the world, the best cook in your little social circle, the one person that everybody says "omg so and so should open a restaurant/go to culinary school/ do catering events, but if you cant do that perfect dish 100 times in a 5 hour dinner service 6 days a week, you're basically worthless in this industry.
3) How ridiculously hard it is to walk into a new kitchen and immediately begin working in it, let alone running it. You don't know the dishes, and even if you do, you don't know the pickups, the timing, the pacing of courses, etc etc.

Yeah, it's been interesting seeing how much food cost & profit margin is emphasized--maybe it'll end up making me a more cynical diner. I've also been interested in seeing who gets hired. I think I've seen multiple episodes in which the chef with more exciting ideas doesn't get hired simply because s/he is worse at overseeing the staff or thinking practically.
post #94 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by erictheobscure View Post

Yeah, it's been interesting seeing how much food cost & profit margin is emphasized--maybe it'll end up making me a more cynical diner. I've also been interested in seeing who gets hired. I think I've seen multiple episodes in which the chef with more exciting ideas doesn't get hired simply because s/he is worse at overseeing the staff or thinking practically.

Cynical diner in what way? As in you'll be less inclined to order things that you think might have a higher markup? Restaurants have ridiculously tiny profit margins.... a 2% profit at the end of the year would represent a really successful restaurant. Most restaurants try to keep food cost overall at 30% in order to get that 2% profit at the end of the year. That means for every $10 dish you buy, in general, only $3 of it is going to food. The rest is split up between keeping the lights on, paying cooks, and all the other overhead. I mean some dishes may have higher markups, like say an osso bucco might sell at a 20% foodcost because it only sells a few orders a night, whereas the ribeye that you sell 70 of a night may have a 40% foodcost because you make up the profit on the volume, as a sort of loss leader.

Anyway, I'm rambling and have no idea what I wanted to say when I started this post, but it has been a nice break from too much studying.
post #95 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post

Cynical diner in what way? As in you'll be less inclined to order things that you think might have a higher markup?

Yes, exactly. I'm genetically programmed to be a cheap Chinaman [sic] anyways, so all this talk of foodcosts is making me downright paranoid. Thank god you told me that shit about slim profit margins so I can eat in peace.
post #96 of 281
back to voltaggio. i've been on the fence about him, but i'm thinking he's a pretty classy guy. our critic wrote a fairly mixed review of ink ... basically that he's a really talented chef but really need editing/focus. and he wrote her a note basically saying at first he wanted to argue every point with her, but once he cooled down he realized he'd be a lot better chef if he took the criticism and tried to improve from it. i thought that showed real maturity.
post #97 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

back to voltaggio. i've been on the fence about him, but i'm thinking he's a pretty classy guy. our critic wrote a fairly mixed review of ink ... basically that he's a really talented chef but really need editing/focus. and he wrote her a note basically saying at first he wanted to argue every point with her, but once he cooled down he realized he'd be a lot better chef if he took the criticism and tried to improve from it. i thought that showed real maturity.

You know I'm a fan of S. Irene Virbila, but the phrase "seminal restaurant" is really infelicitous.

Not sure if Ink is really my kind of place, but it seems interesting enough for me to put on my list of places to check out when I'm back in L.A.
post #98 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by erictheobscure View Post

You know I'm a fan of S. Irene Virbila, but the phrase "seminal restaurant" is really infelicitous.
get your mind out of the gutter. smile.gif
post #99 of 281
"seminal restaurant for the cheftestant alumni" maybe?
post #100 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

back to voltaggio. i've been on the fence about him, but i'm thinking he's a pretty classy guy. our critic wrote a fairly mixed review of ink ... basically that he's a really talented chef but really need editing/focus. and he wrote her a note basically saying at first he wanted to argue every point with her, but once he cooled down he realized he'd be a lot better chef if he took the criticism and tried to improve from it. i thought that showed real maturity.

Would be pretty amazing if you posted a link to the letter he wrote.
post #101 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by sygyzy View Post

Would be pretty amazing if you posted a link to the letter he wrote.

OJFC.
post #102 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

back to voltaggio. i've been on the fence about him, but i'm thinking he's a pretty classy guy. our critic wrote a fairly mixed review of ink ... basically that he's a really talented chef but really need editing/focus. and he wrote her a note basically saying at first he wanted to argue every point with her, but once he cooled down he realized he'd be a lot better chef if he took the criticism and tried to improve from it. i thought that showed real maturity.

Reading that review, I can't imagine how anyone except those with the thinnest skins could take offense. My read on the review (I have not eaten at ink) is that he needs time to edit and balance his menu, so that it's not too one-notey or unbalanced. That doesn't sound unreasonable for a new restaurant.
post #103 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Y View Post

Reading that review, I can't imagine how anyone except those with the thinnest skins could take offense.

you obviously haven't dealt with many chefs ... or journalists for that matter.
post #104 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

you obviously haven't dealt with many chefs ... or journalists for that matter.

Also, this is pretty much the Chefs life work, his reason for being. It's not just a "job" for him, therefore any criticisms he feels acutely and deeply. I could see how he'd be angry with the review and himself.
post #105 of 281
ZOMG it's been a long time since I've felt the kind of burning rage I feel toward Heather.
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