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Law Schools - Where and Why? - Page 5

post #61 of 418
I strongly believe that logical intuition can be trained (my experience, my wife experience, and several people I helped with LSAT), though further discussion on a style forum will not lead anywhere.

OP: you better go to a more appropriate place to ask, answers here should only be taken with a grain of salt.
post #62 of 418
Also, from a person who scored a 180:

Much of what you need to know can be distilled to this:

  • Though exceptional, plenty of TLS users raised their score by as many as 20 points over their initial diagnostic.
  • This generally involves at least three months of hardcore study.
  • To do the same, you want to take at least 30 official PrepTests timed properly and with a bubble sheet.
  • You must thoroughly review your mistakes.
  • Help your brain switch to text processing mode by reading in your free time.
  • Find methods of attack that work best for you.
post #63 of 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by skitlets View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by onix View Post

I would agree if it was 10-15 years ago.
With top 20 graduating thousands every year, skyrocketing tuition cost, shrinking job market, the competition/pressure after graduating is too tough. And getting into top 20 is not as tough as it sounds, 3 months drilling on and plowing through all PrepTests put most people somewhere between 165 and 170 LSAT, and that with a, says, 3.75 GPA put one in a bunch of top 20 already. I would rather go hardcore for 3 months than trying hard for the next 3 years.
Of course, you will most likely to disagree. Just my experience.

The LSAT is definitely a learn-able test. My logic-spatial thinking is terrible and I suck at logic games. I PT'ed 170+ with 4 months of moderate studying and scored a bit under that. A 3.75gpa and 170+ LSAT gets you considered at a lot of good schools.

LSAT (as well as the GMAT, GRE, etc) is a perfectly learnable test.

I sucked at logic games in the beginning as well, choked on the real test, and still managed a T14 score (that I never took advantage of, thank god)
post #64 of 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by XKxRome0ox View Post

and i say the LSAT is not a test you can study for
you either got it or you don't
LSAT is the one test where someone can walk in and take it with zero prep and get a "perfect" score
because it's based on how your brain works naturally
you can't reprogram your brain in 3-4 months

Complete BS. You can easily train your brain to at least think the LSAT way in 1-2 months and increase your ability if you had none before.

People who continue to get low scores just refuse to learn the important things (POE, logic, etc)

I'm not saying you can go from 150 to 170+, but a significant improvement seems to be the norm for the majority of those who really take preparation seriously.

I know I am a good test taker myself, but for me, when it comes to tests like those and prep, the difference between a 2 day review and a 1-2 months prep is going from low to high 90s.. I'd say that's significant.
Quote:
Originally Posted by  View Post



the other sections tell you to pick the "best" answer
so even with unlimited time, you aren't guaranteed to score 100% on them

There is always a right answer up to maybe 99% level... Just have to carefully eliminate all the right things until nothing remains. Every question has "the closest" answer. Out of the two remaining, one is always better.
post #65 of 418
Speaking as a Canadian with a law degree, the US situation looks downright scary. To wit:

-These days, every podunk law school charges Harvard money
-There are more podunk law schools than ever before... so many of them popped up during the boom and even though the market has taken a serious turn for the worse there has been practically no decrease in the number of freshly minted JDs (too profitable to close them, I guess)
-As indicated above, the market generally sucks unless you went to a T20 school or finished at or near the top of your class in the T100.

I paid $4500 a year for my legal education and the market where I live is decent with reasonably good remuneration. Even with that I still second guess myself for going to law school in the first place. I can't imagine what it would be like if I had $120,000 of student debt and marginal hopes of career success. If I were a student in the US thinking about law school, I'd probably be thinking T20 or bust - seriously.
post #66 of 418
Just posting here for posterity. If you are considering law school - DON'T. I don't need the competition and there are already too many of you young punks being pumped out everyday. You will not be able to pay back your loans and you won't be able to beat me in a jury trial. None of you are any good. I was pretty bad when I started but I wasn't as bad as most of you. Go study accounting or some such crap instead. Or go into tax law. I have no desire to bore myself to death with that garbage so go right ahead and take over that area of expertise.

http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/jurisprudence/2011/11/law_schools_should_pay_students_to_quit_.html
Quote:
A crisis is threatening legal education. In constant dollars, tuition at private law schools nearly tripled over the last quarter century. Many a graduate faces a six-figure debt and can’t find a job paying enough to service that debt. Especially troubling are allegations that some schools admit students they know are unlikely to repay their loans—leaving taxpayers (who guarantee some of these loans) holding the bag.
post #67 of 418
Thread Starter 
I think I'll take that as a challenge.
post #68 of 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by El Argentino View Post

I think I'll take that as a challenge.

As long as you're doing it in NV then go for it.
post #69 of 418
I have a good friend that just got out of Miami Law with 200k in debt. Doing doc review in DC for the next few months until he passes the bar. Feel bad for him. I'm trying to encourage him to look into overseas work especially since he's trilingual. Most Americans don't consider that.
post #70 of 418
Thread Starter 
That's an area I've been considering too - a few different people I've talked to have discussed that issue with me.

I'll most likely be getting out of law school with less than 20K (if that) in debt too, so I'm not nearly as frightened now as I was beforehand.
post #71 of 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flambeur View Post

Complete BS. You can easily train your brain to at least think the LSAT way in 1-2 months and increase your ability if you had none before.
People who continue to get low scores just refuse to learn the important things (POE, logic, etc)
I'm not saying you can go from 150 to 170+, but a significant improvement seems to be the norm for the majority of those who really take preparation seriously.
I know I am a good test taker myself, but for me, when it comes to tests like those and prep, the difference between a 2 day review and a 1-2 months prep is going from low to high 90s.. I'd say that's significant.
There is always a right answer up to maybe 99% level... Just have to carefully eliminate all the right things until nothing remains. Every question has "the closest" answer. Out of the two remaining, one is always better.

+1 for sure... the LSAT can be learned and, to an extent, mastered. I speak from experience....
post #72 of 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joffrey View Post

I have a good friend that just got out of Miami Law with 200k in debt. Doing doc review in DC for the next few months until he passes the bar. Feel bad for him. I'm trying to encourage him to look into overseas work especially since he's trilingual. Most Americans don't consider that.

Overseas work where? Doing what? Sorry for your friend, but he's fucked. Getting a job anywhere is tough right now, not to mention one that will pay him enough dough to chip away at 200K in student debt. The only hope for him is to stay in the US, work in the public sector and go on IBR.

Kids, for the last time -- don't take out 200K in loans unless there's a damn good reason for it and you're practically certain you'll get a decent ROI.
post #73 of 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kid Nickels View Post

+1 for sure... the LSAT can be learned and, to an extent, mastered. I speak from experience....

You agreed with a person who could not even write a paragraph without contradicting himself.
Edited by sns23 - 11/23/11 at 5:21pm
post #74 of 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by sns23 View Post

You agreed with a person who could not even write a paragraph without contracting himself.

Hahahaha! Pure gold!
post #75 of 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by sns23 View Post

You agreed with a person who could not even write a paragraph without contracting himself.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord-Barrington View Post

Hahahaha! Pure gold!

ya... I don't think anyone is being contracted here...crackup[1].gif i was merely agreeing with the sentiment that the one can study for the LSAT and improve as opposed to previous poster's opinion that it is what it is...you take it cold and that's it.
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