or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Business, Careers & Education › Law Schools - Where and Why?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Law Schools - Where and Why? - Page 4

post #46 of 418
don't go
seriously
OP's reasons and future plans... do not require a law school
and the OP already knows and stated that he wants to be in the big markets... where the job prospects are already terrible

and i say the LSAT is not a test you can study for
you either got it or you don't
LSAT is the one test where someone can walk in and take it with zero prep and get a "perfect" score
because it's based on how your brain works naturally
you can't reprogram your brain in 3-4 months
post #47 of 418
you have no idea what you are talking about. How do you know what everyone score?
post #48 of 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by XKxRome0ox View Post

don't go
seriously
OP's reasons and future plans... do not require a law school
and the OP already knows and stated that he wants to be in the big markets... where the job prospects are already terrible

and i say the LSAT is not a test you can study for
you either got it or you don't
LSAT is the one test where someone can walk in and take it with zero prep and get a "perfect" score
because it's based on how your brain works naturally
you can't reprogram your brain in 3-4 months

haha. No. It is a test like any other test; with enough preparation and strategy, you can improve any score.
post #49 of 418
Thread Starter 
I took one of the Kaplan LSATs blindly a month ago and got a 160 (being a fairly good test taker). I'm taking it for real in December and hope to creep up to 168-172.

At the same time, I have a good friend who took it on a whim. He got four hours of sleep the night before, having forgot about it initially. Walked out with a 179.
post #50 of 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by XKxRome0ox View Post

don't go
seriously
OP's reasons and future plans... do not require a law school
and the OP already knows and stated that he wants to be in the big markets... where the job prospects are already terrible
and i say the LSAT is not a test you can study for
you either got it or you don't
LSAT is the one test where someone can walk in and take it with zero prep and get a "perfect" score
because it's based on how your brain works naturally
you can't reprogram your brain in 3-4 months

What? Have you even taken the test or studied for it?
Quote:
Originally Posted by sns23 View Post

you have no idea what you are talking about. How do you know what everyone score?

From trolling law school forums. Maybe it's self-sample biased but nearly everyone who puts in the time is able to score 160. I have tons of friends who went through the same process before me and its the same story.

Think of it like a mile competition. You'll get people who got off the couch 2 weeks in advance and you have people who trained for it for MONTHS. Some people are naturally adept at running, some aren't. But if you put in the time, you'll reach a decent time. (Say, I dunno, 6:30 for men) All those people who aren't serious about it bring the average score down.
post #51 of 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by XKxRome0ox View Post

don't go
seriously
OP's reasons and future plans... do not require a law school
and the OP already knows and stated that he wants to be in the big markets... where the job prospects are already terrible
and i say the LSAT is not a test you can study for
you either got it or you don't
LSAT is the one test where someone can walk in and take it with zero prep and get a "perfect" score
because it's based on how your brain works naturally
you can't reprogram your brain in 3-4 months

That's a horseshit excuse used by people who are too lazy to put in the work. The LSAT is extremely learnable, but it takes hard work and most people don't want to do it.
post #52 of 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by El Argentino View Post

I took one of the Kaplan LSATs blindly a month ago and got a 160 (being a fairly good test taker). I'm taking it for real in December and hope to creep up to 168-172.

160 diagnostic is a great start, better than mine. Just be aware that your January app is pretty late in the cycle. A lot of schools do rolling admissions and January apps are at a disadvantage compared to earlier ones.
post #53 of 418
Thread Starter 
Yeah, I know. I learned that late. I went on to LSAC about two weeks before the October sitting to find out that you couldn't sign up that close to the date, so I had to go with december. Oh well.

All the rest of my apps on LSAC are done, LOR are in, Evaluations, etc. Just need that score to hit and press submit.
post #54 of 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by El Argentino View Post

I took one of the Kaplan LSATs blindly a month ago and got a 160 (being a fairly good test taker). I'm taking it for real in December and hope to creep up to 168-172.
At the same time, I have a good friend who took it on a whim. He got four hours of sleep the night before, having forgot about it initially. Walked out with a 179.

^ exactly what i'm talking about

and yes, i have studied for and taken the test (i even went to and graduated from a first tier law school... and i advise people not to go to law school everyday now)
i started off with a pretty high diagnostic score
did get a better score on my actual exam after studying but not THAT much better
if you start off lower, sure you have more room for improvement
but if you already start at 160+ ... it's a different story
and i don't think people who start at like 150 are going to score 170+ just because they study all they can (unless if the 150 was a fluke)
there is a limit to how much you can actually improve on the LSAT because it's about how your brain is wired, not about any accumulated knowledge
post #55 of 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by El Argentino View Post

Yeah, I know. I learned that late. I went on to LSAC about two weeks before the October sitting to find out that you couldn't sign up that close to the date, so I had to go with december. Oh well.
All the rest of my apps on LSAC are done, LOR are in, Evaluations, etc. Just need that score to hit and press submit.

were you always planning on applying to law school? or did you just kinda decide last minute?

if you had been planning... then the fact that you didn't stay on top of your deadline for registering for the LSAT is not a good sign
i'd advise you to seriously reconsider the decision to go to law school

if you just kinda decided last minute...
i'd advise you to seriously reconsider the decision to go to law school
at least put some more time and thought into it and figure out why you want to go to law school and whether you actually need law school to achieve whatever goal you have set for yourself
post #56 of 418
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by XKxRome0ox View Post

were you always planning on applying to law school? or did you just kinda decide last minute?
if you had been planning... then the fact that you didn't stay on top of your deadline for registering for the LSAT is not a good sign
i'd advise you to seriously reconsider the decision to go to law school
if you just kinda decided last minute...
i'd advise you to seriously reconsider the decision to go to law school
at least put some more time and thought into it and figure out why you want to go to law school and whether you actually need law school to achieve whatever goal you have set for yourself

No - hadn't been planning at that point. I'm more or less learning everything as I go.

I'm in the reconsidering process. Trust me. Taking the LSAT in the meantime keeps the door open.
post #57 of 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by El Argentino View Post

No - hadn't been planning at that point. I'm more or less learning everything as I go.
I'm in the reconsidering process. Trust me. Taking the LSAT in the meantime keeps the door open.

yes
do give yourself the option... it's not a bad one

i'm not against going to law school for people who have pretty specific career goals and other plans that require a JD to get there
but there are just too many people who think law school is a magical solution to everything without even remotely considering all the pitfalls

and yes, getting your application in late is not doing you any favor... but it does not automatically mean you won't get a chance at the top schools
i applied on the last day possible (sometime in february i think) and was placed on the waitlist at a T14 school
although i didn't get in off the waitlist (few ever do) it was still a surprise to me that i was even waitlisted at all
post #58 of 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by XKxRome0ox View Post

don't go
seriously
OP's reasons and future plans... do not require a law school
and the OP already knows and stated that he wants to be in the big markets... where the job prospects are already terrible
and i say the LSAT is not a test you can study for
you either got it or you don't
LSAT is the one test where someone can walk in and take it with zero prep and get a "perfect" score
because it's based on how your brain works naturally
you can't reprogram your brain in 3-4 months
Quote:
Originally Posted by XKxRome0ox View Post

^ exactly what i'm talking about
and yes, i have studied for and taken the test (i even went to and graduated from a first tier law school... and i advise people not to go to law school everyday now)
i started off with a pretty high diagnostic score
did get a better score on my actual exam after studying but not THAT much better
if you start off lower, sure you have more room for improvement
but if you already start at 160+ ... it's a different story
and i don't think people who start at like 150 are going to score 170+ just because they study all they can (unless if the 150 was a fluke)
there is a limit to how much you can actually improve on the LSAT because it's about how your brain is wired, not about any accumulated knowledge

With all due respects, and please excuse my language, but this is just bull shit. Here is the thing with LSAT: the tests are not hard if you are given unlimited time; the hard thing about it is doing well under tremendous time pressure. And that's all about practicing. Practice, practice, practice, to the point where many questions can be answered quickly via intuition, without precise logical reasoning.
Edited by onix - 11/4/11 at 7:40pm
post #59 of 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by onix View Post

With all due respects, and please excuse my language, but this is just bull shit. Here is the thing with LSAT: the tests are not hard if you are given unlimited time; the hard thing about it is doing well under tremendous time pressure. And that's all about practicing. Practice, practice, practice, to the point where many questions can be answered quickly via intuition, without precise logical reasoning.

logic games, you can get 100% on every question if you were given enough time
because the games have 1 correct answer
and with enough time, you could work the games front and back to double check your answers

the other sections tell you to pick the "best" answer
so even with unlimited time, you aren't guaranteed to score 100% on them
post #60 of 418
Quote:
Originally Posted by onix View Post

With all due respects, and please excuse my language, but this is just bull shit. Here is the thing with LSAT: the tests are not hard if you are given unlimited time; the hard thing about it is doing well under tremendous time pressure. And that's all about practicing. Practice, practice, practice, to the point where many questions can be answered quickly via intuition, without precise logical reasoning.

and this is why your LSAT performance depends on the way your brain is hardwired
if your brain works that way, you will score high
if it doesn't... then you just can't pass a certain threshold ... because your brain lacks that intuition
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Business, Careers & Education
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Business, Careers & Education › Law Schools - Where and Why?