or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Commuting to Work Wearing Expensive Shoes
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Commuting to Work Wearing Expensive Shoes - Page 4

post #46 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

My girlfriend asks me to teach her how to iron my shirts properly. I still don't trust her.

You seem to have a strong team of sycophants. Must be that mane.
post #47 of 138
She loves me. inlove.gif

I am getting a haircut after work today. If you want a lock of it I accept paypal devil.gif
post #48 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

She loves me. inlove.gif
I am getting a haircut after work today. If you want a lock of it I accept paypal devil.gif

541

you see what I did there?
post #49 of 138
There is an RM Williams joke here somewhere, but I can't seem to find it...
post #50 of 138
I drive so it doesnt matter much to me. I have a pair of rainy day shoes to protect my more expensive stuff.
post #51 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by swiego View Post

I suppose I will be the voice of dissention here. I agree that things happen and one mustn’t lose too much sleep when something happens. That said, I have no problem with the philosophy of saving your nicer things for special times in order to mitigate the possible damage one might face when shit does, indeed, happen. I don’t drink my finest, most expensive wines when I simply want a buzz; I save them for when I have friends and family over whom I care about. I don’t take my most expensive camera lenses with me whenever I walk out the door; I take them when I think I am going somewhere that merits both the inconvenience and the risk of carrying them along. I don't expect my fiance to wear her most expensive jewelry each time we go out the door. And, I don’t always wear my finest shoes for something like a commute if I know that they’re going to be put through the ringer.
Practically speaking, I do not have a subway commute but I do sometimes drive a roadster with custom machined aluminum pedals with pretty sharp edges that love to scrape leather off shoes. I mostly am in my office, but sometimes I am touring a factory or construction site walking on wet mud. It’s comforting to know that my fine shoes can handle this sort of stress, but just as I don’t want to drive the roadster when there are four inches of snow on the ground (even though I could take the “cars are meant to be driven” approach and dress it up with winter tires and 250lbs in the trunk), I’m completely comfortable swapping to something I care less about destroying by accident.
I suppose the root difference is that I [apparently] am much, much less wealthy than most of the audience here. Like most of this country in the first few centuries of its formation, I can afford some nice things but I cannot afford to mistreat them. As my predecessors saved their fine china for special guests, and their Sunday finest for, well, Sunday, I WANT to treat my finer items as precious. I suspect that many people here have a strong modern consumer attitude toward luxury items: they are swimming in them, buying them on a monthly or even weekly basis, and have stocked up so many shoes that they frankly do not care so much if one of them gets damaged. I don't recall my reasonably well-to-do grandparents having anywhere near the amount of "stuff" that we do today. I am sure they only had a couple of pairs of shoes: one for daily use and one for important occasions. As someone going through a phase in his life where he feels he has TOO MANY things and wants to pare down to that simpler, more old-fashioned life with fewer, more precious items, I am learning in the process that I need to make more situational use of these precious items a higher priority in order for them to last longer and be in good condition and ready to go when I need them.
I suppose it's different when you have four pairs of $500+ shoes at any given time; a good, severe scratch on one wouldn't make you worry at all about what to wear for a more formal event that same night...
It’s funny how a group of people who follow classical / traditional looks and styles so thoroughly seem to have such a modern sensibility when it comes to disposability and consumerism.
(Then again I may be misreading things in a fundamental way here... for this group, $1,000 shoes may indeed be considered "commuter and daily workhorse" shoes... like someone buying a $120K sedan as a daily driver... in which case none of the above applies.)

I agree with you. I have few nice pairs of shoes, which I can’t afford to buy on monthly basis and wear occasionally. I also drive an old MG roadster and the clutch and break pedals are very close to each other and you will scuff your shoes while changing gear or breaking. Or even when taking your foot out of footrest. Anyway, I take a pair of sports shoe and then change to dress shoes. Also leather-soled shoes slips the pedals easily.
post #52 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cuttingboard View Post


I'm an young fogie too...I use either a 1960's model Gillette Flatboy adjustable or Slim adjustable razor every morning. A DE razor may take a couple extra minutes in the morning but my face feels so much better and my skin is in better condition than when I used a Gillette Fusion razor.


Ditto here.  I have always been a young fogie, my wife laughs at me a bit, but she is similar. in a lot of ways.

 

I have my DE shaves down to basically the same time as I could with a Fusion and canned goo.  Reserve the straights for the weekend.

post #53 of 138
1.5hr commute for me to NYC (LIRR+15 minute walk).
Sometimes walking 15 minutes to and from client sites.

I have the luxury of working in a casual office, and am able to store my suits and shoes for when I have to pop up to the clients, or we have a meeting in the office.

I agree that shoes are meant to be worn, but see no need to put mileage on either pair of EGs I own during a commute where I'm doing my best to ignore everyone around me.


That said, if I was obligated to wear a suit on the commute, I don't think I could ever bring myself to be one of the guys who wears running sneakers with the suit for travel purposes.
post #54 of 138


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MasterplayerC View Post

1.5hr commute for me to NYC (LIRR+15 minute walk).
Sometimes walking 15 minutes to and from client sites.
I have the luxury of working in a casual office, and am able to store my suits and shoes for when I have to pop up to the clients, or we have a meeting in the office.
I agree that shoes are meant to be worn, but see no need to put mileage on either pair of EGs I own during a commute where I'm doing my best to ignore everyone around me.
That said, if I was obligated to wear a suit on the commute, I don't think I could ever bring myself to be one of the guys who wears running sneakers with the suit for travel purposes.


I must admit I am that guy. As a young person just starting my career I cannot afford to replace my collection of three pairs of Allen Edmonds shoes anytime soon. So instead I walk my 2 miles to work in sneakers and I carry my shoes with me. Sad I know but at least my work is business casual most days so I am not in a suit that often. 
 

 

post #55 of 138
I alternate driving and taking the L depending on after-work plans. Honestly I get more scuffs from the pedals in the car than I do taking the L. As to weather - if it rains, I wear galoshes. IMO they are shoes and just like any other item of clothing I wear - no matter how much I try to prevent it shit will happen. Literally - like the time one of those damn pigeons crapped on my shoulder. Hell, the other day in a meeting my boss stepped on my foot and scuffed a perfectly good shine. Of course my "it's just stuff" mentality was reinforced 2 weeks ago when a woman in the oncoming lane blacked out and veered across the median and slammed into my driver's door. 3 wrecked cars but nobody hurt - but I did scuff up a gorgeous shine on my Walnut Strands climbing over the console to get out the passenger side door (that driver's door will never open again!). smile.gif It's just stuff, it's not going to rule my life - I buy that stuff to make my life better.
post #56 of 138
Don't wear what you can't afford to... Well... Wear!
post #57 of 138
Silly dog, this is Freedomland™, where people who earn 40k spend like they earn 400k.

Those who actually earn 400k... well they just get more cocaine and hookers icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
post #58 of 138
@GloStix: Ah, I hear ya; dress like it's 1880 and spend like it's 1999 (financial realities notwithstanding)! Now to befriend some SFer's on the upper echelon so I can get invited to some parties (or par-TAYS as I believe they are called). wink.gif
post #59 of 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by MPAVictoria View Post



 


I must admit I am that guy. As a young person just starting my career I cannot afford to replace my collection of three pairs of Allen Edmonds shoes anytime soon. So instead I walk my 2 miles to work in sneakers and I carry my shoes with me. Sad I know but at least my work is business casual most days so I am not in a suit that often. 

 

In that case I'd prefer to topy my shoes. I think if you worry so much about your shoes that you are concerned about commuting in them or act on that fear and change at the office, then you probably should buy cheaper shoes.
post #60 of 138
I am totally guilty of having a couple beater suits for when it rains. Snow is not so bad since I normally wear an overcoat, but overshoes are super key.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Commuting to Work Wearing Expensive Shoes