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Let's talk about sushi... - Page 10

post #136 of 197
Plebe here. I don't know that I've ever had actual good sushi... I've been to many middle to higher end places in DC (not the most expensive like Makato), and it's basically all the same to me. There is an obvious difference between grocery store stuff and what I get in a decent restaurant, but beyond that I can't really tell a difference. Upon reflection I feel like sushi is often really a conduit for the soy sauce and wasabi. Salty and spicy.

So what do I look for? I don't order rolls with 4 types of fish or anything, I'm happy with the plain rolls, and I like sashimi (again though, probably because of soy and wasabi). Is it really a matter of going to the best place possible to set the status quo? I'm wondering if ignorance is bliss in this regard.

I've never had anything resembling that picture above.
post #137 of 197
Thread needs more pics.

Dunno what that orange stuff is, but it doesn't look good. Get rid of that and it isn't too bad.

232

OMG! These look SSSSSSSSOOOOOOOOOO good! Hungry yet? wink.gif

467
263

But here's the real piece de la resistance, the creme de la creme, the best of the best, what I wish I could drool.gif like a jillion times!

263
post #138 of 197
^ That last one resembles the lasagna monster from Star Trek.
post #139 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by erictheobscure View Post

^ That last one resembles the lasagna monster from Star Trek.

But it looks soooooooooooooooooooooooooooo good! I mean, who would have ever thought to put jalapenos on sushi! Brilliant!
post #140 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by KJT View Post

Plebe here. I don't know that I've ever had actual good sushi... I've been to many middle to higher end places in DC (not the most expensive like Makato), and it's basically all the same to me. There is an obvious difference between grocery store stuff and what I get in a decent restaurant, but beyond that I can't really tell a difference. Upon reflection I feel like sushi is often really a conduit for the soy sauce and wasabi. Salty and spicy.

So what do I look for? I don't order rolls with 4 types of fish or anything, I'm happy with the plain rolls, and I like sashimi (again though, probably because of soy and wasabi). Is it really a matter of going to the best place possible to set the status quo? I'm wondering if ignorance is bliss in this regard.

I've never had anything resembling that picture above.

I'm certainly no expert, but I think it's quite possible that the quality of fish would be pretty indistinguishable across a number of mid-level sushi places in a particular city. But a better place might have specials with rarer, tastier fish they've sourced. And you could certainly judge a place by quality of preparation--if they've cut the fish properly (nothing gristly, not clumsily hacked). But if you're eating sushi, then rice is a decisive factor--temperature, texture, and seasoning. Sushi can be downright gross if the rice is off.

I suppose the short answer would be to stop overdoing it with the soy sauce and wasabi sludge so you can taste the ingredients.
post #141 of 197

3rd picture looks very messy. The rest look good though. I am pretty sure that orange stuff is a type of caviar...

post #142 of 197
going to 15 East for a new years eve dinner. Should be lovely.
post #143 of 197
@KJT it's not so much what you order as it is where you go. the sushi should be pretty obviously different from the majority of the stuff you've had from the fish to the rice to the gari (ginger). if you go to a good place the biggest surprise you should have is how good the rice is. for traditional sushi chef training it takes years to even get to touch the rice and it takes years more to be able to prepare it perfectly. the fish shouldn't be pre-filleted. if they sell rolls like california rolls and spicy tuna rolls i'm pretty sure you're not going to get what you're looking for. be prepared to spend a lot of money although some of the best sushi i've had was only $4, 5 a piece compared to $10, 15 at some of the most renown places.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

going to 15 East for a new years eve dinner. Should be lovely.

did you make reservations? i wanted to go to 15 east for the day after new year's or something
post #144 of 197
I've had some of the best sushi in the world for about $4 a piece. It's good to be local, of course, but the $15 turnip pickle wrapped flamed-chutoro maki in 1/2" of ponzu dish is a not a good spend.
post #145 of 197
this isn't sushi talk but i had a complete rip off of nobu's black cod with miso dish and fuck me if it wasn't pretty damn good. i can imagine some of his sushi is actually pretty damn good even if it costs like $15 a piece.
post #146 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post

this isn't sushi talk but i had a complete rip off of nobu's black cod with miso dish and fuck me if it wasn't pretty damn good. i can imagine some of his sushi is actually pretty damn good even if it costs like $15 a piece.

Where'd you have this tasty knock-off?
post #147 of 197
One of the former chefs at Nobu here in Vegas has a place called Sen of Japan that has it.
post #148 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post

this isn't sushi talk but i had a complete rip off of nobu's black cod with miso dish and fuck me if it wasn't pretty damn good. i can imagine some of his sushi is actually pretty damn good even if it costs like $15 a piece.

Those type of dishes are pretty easy to make though. Just buy miso-zuke or if you like sake flavor, get kasu-zuke and grill up the fish. I bet a place like Nobu just uses farmed anyway (as even most Japanese shops only sell farmed), but if you look you can get a much better piece of fish than what somewhere like Nobu uses (of course I don't know in the States). Also, the grilling technique at somewhere like Nobu is not going to be anything special (same quality as doing it at home). You have to go to a nice Kappo or Ryoutei to get professional quality grilling, which unfortunately are only available in Japan.
post #149 of 197
467
post #150 of 197
^that's how all fusion rolls should be served
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragon View Post

Those type of dishes are pretty easy to make though. Just buy miso-zuke or if you like sake flavor, get kasu-zuke and grill up the fish. I bet a place like Nobu just uses farmed anyway (as even most Japanese shops only sell farmed), but if you look you can get a much better piece of fish than what somewhere like Nobu uses (of course I don't know in the States). Also, the grilling technique at somewhere like Nobu is not going to be anything special (same quality as doing it at home). You have to go to a nice Kappo or Ryoutei to get professional quality grilling, which unfortunately are only available in Japan.

i'm sure some of it (like seabass) is farmed, but i'm fairly sure that a lot of the seafood is higher end stuff. i remember reading an interview or something where an executive officer was quoted as saying the scallops are caught by divers in britain.

i think i'll actually try the recipe (was at a terribly mediocre nobu, masa wannabe hipster american japanese fusion joint a bit north of nyc).
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