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What comprises the ultimate coat?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I suggested that someone else start this topic, largely due to my own lethargy, but as one has yet to be started I decided it was time for decisive action. Yet, as always in the realm of fashion, decisiveness is difficult- fashion is, like any other art, entirely subjective (yes, even if GQ does try to force-feed us). So, here it is- What comprises the ultimate coat? First, let me define what I see as a coat. I don't think it's actually called a coat, but leave that be. What I see as a substantial coat is something that is not neccesarily hard-wearing, but at the very least practical and warm enough for a full-blown snowstorm in the Alps (or Rockies, for that matter). This is the starting point. Now make comments. It is appropriate that I start. My ideal coat has a very sharp, almost phantom-like silhouette. It should give its wearer a very sharp, hard body, and possibly accentuate the width of shoulders and the slimness of waist like a good suit. I personally like funnel-neck coats, and love the military-style Slimane coats this year. Epaulets are VERY cool. I prefer things single breasted, too, but that matters very little. The material should not make the jacket unwieldy, but should be semi-water-resistant and, of course, warm. The inside should be comfortable- maybe a little fur or something similarly soft and lush- the best test of a jacket is if girls love wearing it. So, I think that's about it for now, my opinion is out. Start commenting. (preferably not on my poor spelling or the overall coherency of this post... I'm tired as a dog) European Interloper
post #2 of 15
I don't think it's the ultimate coat but I like this coat a lot and for the price it's amazing http://merc.wisshost.net/shop.as....7563503
post #3 of 15
Renwick, do you own anything from Merc? I like their stuff, just looking for an opinion.
post #4 of 15
Hmmm... although completely agree on the necessity of a sharp silhouette, I have to question your criteria of warmth. In my eyes asking a coat, worn mostly from the car to the office door, to withstand alpine storms is just as absurd as asking GM to bulletproof its luxury cars. Unless one is planning to scale the Everest in a three-piece suit, which is an absurd idea, the fashion of powder and avalanches should be left to sport [read snowboard, ski, etc] apparel manufacturers. Even if one could cram sufficient insulating material into a fashionable, sharp overcoat a question of style remains. Some elements, such as material, sleeve construction, waste style, length, zipper vs buttons breast closure, are dictated by the elements and will hinder style. Secondly, while agreeing on the appeal of military styling, I would like to question your LOVE for epaulets. In my eyes they detract from sharp shoulder silhouettes. I believe they were only cool on intrepid officers of Victorian epoch and have considerably depreciated in dazzle since the images of last world war parades. I know that every major designer this year would beg to differ, but in my eyes epaulets, unlike its roots of military styling, are simply a fad. A bad one at that. Completely agree with single-breasted style, and am partial to the styling of the coat suggested by Renwick's link. Would like to throw in that in my opinion, the "ultimate coat" should be 3/4 length and need not have any visible zippers. .
post #5 of 15
Hmm. I'm going to have to say it doesn't really exist. Different coats work for different purposes. For example, if I'm going casual I'll wear a peacoat, duffel coat, or canvas car-coat. For more formal occasions, I'll wear (depending on the colour of what I'm wearing underneath) either a black or camel full-length overcoat. If it's raining, I'll wear a black nylon "urban trench" or the aforementioned canvas with removeable shearling lining car coat. What all coats should have in common, I think, is first and foremost warmth. After all, in much of the civilised world many people take mass transit and/or walk a great deal in their coats. Second comes fabric with a soft hand. The girl-test is key. I also don't particularly care for zippers, as they can eat jumpers and scarves. For a warm coat, I like DB simply because of the extra layer of fabric over the chest. What I like about the coat pictured is the ticket pocket, but what I don't like about it is the covered placket. The coat from last season that I liked best was probably the DB shearling in the Miu Miu collection. Peace, JG
post #6 of 15
The coat in Renwick's link is darn close to a classic covert-coat. Like a Chesterfield but shorter, boxier and more casual. I've got a beautiful one in tan cavalry twill with an olive velvet collar. It's a bespoke model made in London in 1970. (Although you would never know it's that old - it's in perfect condition and it's a style that never changes.) I'm going to have to put it on ebay though as I never wear it. Where I live (CA central coast)  it never gets cold enough for an overcoat. However if I lived in an area that necessitated a topcoat I'd go with a classic Polo Coat or perhaps a single breasted raglan-shoulder model. I love them in camel but would probably buy navy as camel is not that practical - too easy to stain. As it is I practically live in my Barbour coat. It's not overtly stylish but it's indestructable and I can throw it on over just about everything. I bought one of the ventile cotton models so I don't have to worry about getting sylkoil all over my seats. I like lightweight shearling coats and pea coats. And I'm rather fond of the Longhi leather car-coats I just picked up. The quality is incredible.
post #7 of 15
I am just merely wondering if any of you have seen Canada Goose coat in your area? Practically everybody in Sweden is wearing Canada Goose, mostly in black and sometime in red or tan color.
post #8 of 15
whether casual or formal, the coat should fit properly for the occassion (ie a coat for skiing should fit for it functionality first) and create a silhouette complimentary to the wearer
post #9 of 15
Check the one on the left at http://www.kamkyl.com - I almost bought one in waxed cotton, except the proportion was off for me. Otherwise it had a nice slim silhouette and was warm enough for me. I'll second the functionality aspect though. If I'm going out in a snowstorm, I have an Arc'Teryx ski/hiking type jacket that works better than anything else (that and my Tilley winter hat.) Doesn't look all that stylish but who cares, it's a snowstorm.
post #10 of 15
If i was in the alps I'd probably be wearing Spyder. My ski suit of choice since I started racing when i was 12 or something heh. Haven't raced in a few years now but I still like Spyder better than anything else.
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Renwick, do you own anything from Merc? I like their stuff, just looking for an opinion.
I own that coat and another jacket. It's no Hermes but the quality is good for the price and they have some very nice linings (plaids,purple satin, etc.). I'd rank the quality around the same as Prada but cheaper (except Mercs suits aren't as good).
post #12 of 15
Quote:
The coat in Renwick's link is darn close to a classic covert-coat. Like a Chesterfield but shorter, boxier and more casual. I've got a beautiful one in tan cavalry twill with an olive velvet collar. It's a bespoke model made in London in 1970. (Although you would never know it's that old - it's in perfect condition and it's a style that never changes.) I'm going to have to put it on ebay though as I never wear it. Where I live (CA central coast)  it never gets cold enough for an overcoat. However if I lived in an area that necessitated a topcoat I'd go with a classic Polo Coat or perhaps a single breasted raglan-shoulder model. I love them in camel but would probably buy navy as camel is not that practical - too easy to stain. As it is I practically live in my Barbour coat. It's not overtly stylish but it's indestructable and I can throw it on over just about everything. I bought one of the ventile cotton models so I don't have to worry about getting sylkoil all over my seats. I like lightweight shearling coats and pea coats. And I'm rather fond of the Longhi leather car-coats I just picked up. The quality is incredible.
When you put it on ebay let me know.
post #13 of 15
You guys realize that the alps are for skiing, right? ;p (editk i just now read the first post in it's entirety, I previosuly hadn't read past the snow storm thing heh) Anyway since you guys are just listing off winter coats in general, here's what I'm gonna have made next winter... A black, or maybe a very dark charcoal, cashmere overcoat that drops to just below the knees. I was thinking a deep, blood-red silk satin lining. It will be single breasted, but with a fairly high closure. It will be my every day winter coat, which means I won't be wearing a suit under it. For this reason i'm gonna have it cut quite slim for a sharp silhouette. I'm actually not sure about the cashmere content part yet.. I mean I love 100% cashmere, but I also want it to last a long time and I'll be wearing it all winter (a long canadian winter at that). If I'm sitting in the car with it for 40-50 minutes per day, would 100% cashmere start to look worn pretty quickly (the part i sit on that rubs against the fabric in the car I mean)? I'd appreciate comments on this point actually. I have cashmere sweaters, but the cashmere isn't woven in the same way as for a coat and so I have no idea how durable a pure cashmere coat would be. Durability is important to me cause this coat isn't gonna be cheap heh... Anyway.. If not pure cashmere, I won't drop below 60% cashmere/40% wool. I prefer higher cashmere content, obviously.
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Check the one on the left at http://www.kamkyl.com - I almost bought one in waxed cotton, except the proportion was off for me.  Otherwise it had a nice slim silhouette and was warm enough for me. I'll second the functionality aspect though.  If I'm going out in a snowstorm, I have an Arc'Teryx ski/hiking type jacket that works better than anything else (that and my Tilley winter hat.)  Doesn't look all that stylish but who cares, it's a snowstorm.
I absolutely love that Kamkyl trench. How are their prices?
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by gqelements
. In my eyes asking a coat, worn mostly from the car to
the office door, to withstand alpine storms ... Some elements, such as
material, sleeve construction, waste style, length, zipper vs buttons breast
closure, are dictated by the elements and will hinder style.

Secondly, while agreeing on the appeal of military styling ...

Military style. Sturdy. Warm, for waiting when the car doesn't show.
Secure pockets acceessible without opening the coat.

n3b Snorkel Parka

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