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wine book

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I am interested in trying some new types of red wine, espectially domestic. I usually go by personal recomendations, or stuff that I know, when I buy wine. I am thinking about getting one of those guides that tells you about pretty much every wine that you come across in the wine shop, so that I can start trying wines that I don't know, with a greater level of confidence.

anybody have any recomendations?
post #2 of 19
A great wine book is Anrea Immer's Great Wines Made Simple. It's mostly targeted to people who are just getting "into" wine, but it remains a great resource even after you feel you have your feet under you.

After that I would recommend the Wine Advocate, but only if you like Robert Parker's style -- big, unfiltered etc.

The best method to explore wines (especially for the every day kind of wine) IMO is to find a great wine shop that has frequent tastings. If you're in Boston I'd recommend Federal Wines, but there are others too. You can explore fancier wines through wine shops too but usually from special dinners organized by the shop.

I am not a fan of the encyclopedic journals because I find they're dated by the time they're published -- unless of course you're focusing on the classified growths and other premier wines -- in which case you probably alredy know enough about a wine that you don't need a book.
post #3 of 19
Hugh Johnson's 2007 Pocket Encyclopaedia of Wine and Oz Clarke's 2007 Pocket Book of Wine are great resources. They are also small enough to carry into a wine shop to use as a reference while shopping.
post #4 of 19
I'll second the Andrea Immer recommendation. It's sitting on my shelf right now. It's quite good for introducing you to wine, categories of taste, simple rules to remember etc, but also has a very nice exploration of specific wine varietals and regions.
post #5 of 19
Honestly, I wouldn't buy a book because by the time it's in print it's probably outdated. I would just check out a forum like erobertparker.com
post #6 of 19
If you want recommendations on literally what is in the shops now, a newsletter is likely to be your best bet-- assuming you and the writer see eye to eye. Clive Coates' The Vine was among the best of breed before his retirement, and The Burghound is a terrific resource on Burgundy and some left coast Pinots.

Otherwise, a good encyclopedia is a fine thing to have. Hugh Johnson's used to set standards, and often had good features like pictures of wine in glasses at various stages of maturity (young Bordeaux, mature B, over-the-hill B, etc.). Don't know what he's offering these days other than his pocket encyclopedia which is wonderful.

There are several good books on French wines by Clive Coates (who has thrown down the gauntlet on Robert Parker a number of times-- it will be interesting to see who is right in 10 years about the 2003 Pavie!).

OP asked about domestic wine books in particular, and I don't know of any. Since much of our wine technology is imported, however, background reading on the major European types can do no harm and might provide useful perspective.
post #7 of 19
My brother-in-law received the Jancis Robinson wine encyc'a for xmas. It is very nice indeed and now on my Amazon wish list.
post #8 of 19
I third the recommendation for Immer's book. It's a good basic overview of the "big six" varietals and their growing regions. Once you go through the tasting tours, you'll know what your preferences are and will be able to find (or ask for) new wines that fit them more easily.
post #9 of 19
Bordeaux - Parker's books.
Burgundy - Clive Coats' "Cote d'Or" is a must.
Wine Spectator Forums - to see what others are drinking and thinking.
eBob is for seasoned drinkers.
post #10 of 19
I like Californian wines, and use this website as a guide. I've found their awards to be spot-on. Never had a bad bottle from any of their top picks.

http://www.winejudging.com/medal_win...006/index.html
post #11 of 19
Globetrotter,

I believe reading that you had recently moved to the greater Chicagoland metro area. If this is indeed the case, I recommend visiting Sam's Wine and Spirits. There are three locations: Lincoln Park (the mothership), Downer's Grove, and Highland Park.

www.samswine.com

All of Sam's stores have huge selections, good prices, and knowledgeble staff. I usually find myself flagging down one of their employees, showing them a bottle that I like, and then asking for their recommendation of a similar bottle. In 4 years of shopping there they have only lead me astray once. On many occasions, I have asked for a recommendation on a $50 bottle (as a gift, for instance), only to have them recommend a $20 bottle that tastes just as good.

(Disclaimer: I am in no way affiliated with Sam's Wine and Spirits.)

ADR
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter
I am interested in trying some new types of red wine, espectially domestic. I usually go by personal recomendations, or stuff that I know, when I buy wine. I am thinking about getting one of those guides that tells you about pretty much every wine that you come across in the wine shop, so that I can start trying wines that I don't know, with a greater level of confidence.

anybody have any recomendations?

I would say forget the books. They will come later. First go to a bottle shop and buy mixed cases of wines you've never tried before (differemnt varietals, styles, regions, etc). best way to learn what your palate will like. Keep doing this. If you don't know much, find a good fine wine store and ask the manager to assist. Then augment this with books. Just because Parker likes something doesn't mean you will. That's the best way to learn...as I did.
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zubberah
Just because Parker likes something doesn't mean you will.
Maybe so, but following professional ratings at least will save newbie from a mixed case of plonk. Parker's Bordeaux ratings are solid and having his book at hand while shopping is a not a bad idea for new winos.
post #14 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ADR275
Globetrotter,

I believe reading that you had recently moved to the greater Chicagoland metro area. If this is indeed the case, I recommend visiting Sam's Wine and Spirits. There are three locations: Lincoln Park (the mothership), Downer's Grove, and Highland Park.

www.samswine.com

All of Sam's stores have huge selections, good prices, and knowledgeble staff. I usually find myself flagging down one of their employees, showing them a bottle that I like, and then asking for their recommendation of a similar bottle. In 4 years of shopping there they have only lead me astray once. On many occasions, I have asked for a recommendation on a $50 bottle (as a gift, for instance), only to have them recommend a $20 bottle that tastes just as good.

(Disclaimer: I am in no way affiliated with Sam's Wine and Spirits.)

ADR

thanks - I'll try that.
post #15 of 19
Binny's also gets high marks from my family in Chicago.
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