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Recipe Thread - Page 5

post #61 of 456
pumpkin basil soup?
post #62 of 456
I got a pasta machine the other day, anybody got any fun ravioli/ravioli soup recipes? I kind of feel like making something involving chicken livers and ravioli or a foie ravioli.
post #63 of 456
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post

I got a pasta machine the other day, anybody got any fun ravioli/ravioli soup recipes? I kind of feel like making something involving chicken livers and ravioli or a foie ravioli.

I absolutely love this recipe:


Cook 200g onions in butter, covered, over low heat for 1.25 hours with a bit of brown sugar. The onions should brown slowly. Deglaze with 100 ml white wine, 500 ml chicken stock, a slice of ginger, 1/2 t coriander and a piece of star anise (wrap them in cheesecloth so that you can remove from the soup,) and cook 20 more minutes.

Make a bechamel with 250 ml milk, 20 g flour and 20 g butter. Stir in 50 g cantal and cool. Stuff the raviolis with this. Bake thin cantal slices at 350 for 8 minutes on a silpat so they make little cheese crisps.

Reheat the soup. Cook the ravioli for three minutes in salted water. Ladle the soup into bowls and serve with the ravioli on top (maybe 5 per bowl?) and the cheese crisp on the side.


I think I poasted a picture of it somewhere. We make it when guests come as well, cause it is really easy to handle when timing goes sideways.
post #64 of 456
I remember that picture, you did it recently. I will try sometime, love coriander and star anise. thanks.
post #65 of 456
Great thread, I remeber seeing it when I was on holiday but completely forgot about it. Will definitely be doing some of the recipes posted here.

I've got a request. Want to do some raviolis by myself soon and am looking for a filling. matt, you've just posted some spinach ones, were they good or do you know a better filling? Also, any tips for preparing the raviolis as this will be practically my first time doing raviolis or pasta by myself. I think I will use the method Marcella Hazan describes but unfortunately I neither have a pasta machine nor an original Romagna rolling pin. However I will still give it a try. She states that one shall use more wet pastry for raviolis/tortellonis etc. as it helps to form and close them. Do you think this is clever or do you just use some egg yolk or so to seal them? I imagine that sticky pastry might be a little hard to handle, hopefully you can help me.
post #66 of 456
Hmm, I don't find it difficult to close ravioli with regular pasta dough. I use 1 egg per 100 g 00 flour, and add a bit of olive oil. I don't use yolk to close them, I just push together with my fingers. You basically make the outer later into one layer by pressing the two together, if that makes sense. Anyway, it is pretty easy. As for fillings, there are many, and it really depends on the flavor and idea you are looking for. Foodguy is way more knowledgeable about making pasta than I am. Others likely are as well.
post #67 of 456
Thanks!
foodguy, I'm waiting! What's your favorite ravioli filling? Pretty much open for anything but vegetables are fine. No Rambo, no asparagus.
post #68 of 456
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

Thanks!
foodguy, I'm waiting! What's your favorite ravioli filling? Pretty much open for anything but vegetables are fine. No Rambo, no asparagus.

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post #69 of 456
sorry, i haven't been checking in on this thread (i do have a job ... for a while anyway). generally, when i make ravioli, it's a very simple ricotta/herb/spinach filling. but just as traditional would be to take leftover braised meat, chop it fine, bind it with a little breadcrumb, some eggs and a lot of parm. probably my favorite filling is an egg, but i haven't tried that myself yet. make a raviolo about 5 inches square or so, a low mound of ricotta with a divot in the center, a raw egg, then top and seal. when you cook it, by the time the raviolo is done, the egg should be just soft-poached, so when you cut into it, the yolk comes out into the brown butter sauce.
just saw the chicken liver comment ... i don't do chicken liver ravioli (though you could certainly fold some into the braised meat). but i do really love cannelloni filled with chicken livers ... basically just a sheet of cooked pasta wrapped in a tube around a filling (cooked chicken livers bound with a little bechamel), then baked with more bechamel, a nice strip of tomato sauce and a topping of parm. nice winter dish. very rich.
post #70 of 456
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

sorry, i haven't been checking in on this thread (i do have a job ... for a while anyway). generally, when i make ravioli, it's a very simple ricotta/herb/spinach filling. but just as traditional would be to take leftover braised meat, chop it fine, bind it with a little breadcrumb, some eggs and a lot of parm. probably my favorite filling is an egg, but i haven't tried that myself yet. make a raviolo about 5 inches square or so, a low mound of ricotta with a divot in the center, a raw egg, then top and seal. when you cook it, by the time the raviolo is done, the egg should be just soft-poached, so when you cut into it, the yolk comes out into the brown butter sauce.

OK, so this is an awesome cheater way to do that dish, and I make it often (including this week, see pics wink.gif) Cut the pasta into the squares, and blanch them for two minutes, then refresh. Place each pasta square on a piece of oiled parchment. Then make your mound (I use spinach puree and mascarpone) and place the yolk of the egg in the center. Brush the edge of each piece of pasta with a little egg white, then place the unfilled halves on top of the filled halves, and press down lightly on the edges. Stick them all on a sheet pan in the fridge. Then, to serve, you stick them in a 350 oven for 6.5 minutes, remove the top parchment, and place the ravioli on plates. Spoon over sauce.

This way you don't have to worry about the two hardest things in the original. First, you don't need to press out the air from the ravioli and squeeze the edges, a time where it is very easy to break the yolk, and second you don't have to worry about getting them out of the water gently. Again, easy to break the yolk. You have to be a little gentle removing the ravioli from the bottom parchment. Either an oiled spatula or a second pair of hands helps, but it is so easy comparatively. It is also way easier to do for a group.

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post #71 of 456
^^^nice idea!
post #72 of 456
Thanks guys. I think I'll try out matt's version tomorrow. Hopefully I will be able to prepare a proper dough.
post #73 of 456
making fresh pasta isn't hard at all, particularly if you have a pasta machine to roll it out (the rolling technique with a pin is different than pie dough ... it' s much more of a stretching than a smashing).
the biggest potential problem is going to fast. knead the dough until it's silky (you can do this with the pasta machine, too .. just keep folding and running it through on the widest setting). and then let it rest. that's really important. when the glutens get tight, things go bad. you get weird little tears. you get laminar disruptions where the pasta wants to curl over on itself. if any of these things start to happen, just set it aside for 5 minutes and let the glutens relax.
post #74 of 456
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

^^^nice idea!

Were it mine, I would happily take credit. It works really well, and once you have the timing for your oven, it is a no brainer. Egg ravioli is probably my favorite fresh pasta dish too (carbonara is a run away first overall,) and I screwed it up countless times before I came across this.
post #75 of 456
Matt, where was that turnip recipe from? It was fabulous. Do you have any other good ones like that? I've also got some great watermelon radishes that I'd like to do something with, other than slice paper thin to decorate my plates.
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