or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › The Official Tweed Appreciation Thread
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Official Tweed Appreciation Thread - Page 125

post #1861 of 2072
Only a half hour left to get your bids in on this Kent Wang tweed jacket (and two scarves) being auctioned off for charity, guys:

http://www.styleforum.net/t/371247/auction-thread-for-the-styleforum-2013-holiday-charity-drive-for-the-ronald-mcdonald-house/225#post_6785831
post #1862 of 2072
Quote:
Originally Posted by JermynStreet View Post

A bit tasteless, comrade.
[/quote

I like to keep things in historical perpective, even if
"a bit tasteless" to the overly effete.
post #1863 of 2072
Quote:
Originally Posted by comrade View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JermynStreet View Post

A bit tasteless, comrade.
[/quote

I like to keep things in historical perspective, even if
"a bit tasteless" to the overly effete.

 

I don't want to argue, but if you're really going to play the historical perspective card, don't you think all 1.1 trillion terabytes of the internet could have provided you with a photo from that time period that wasn't from a concentration camp? By the way, I just did an image search for historical German clothing and came back with thousands of hits. It is important that you know that I was criticizing your choice of words, not you personally. I am not asking you to kiss the ground holocaust victims walk on, but choosing that picture of all pictures, I can't entirely believe that the choice was motivated purely to show a true example of historical German kamp kleidung. Would you think it would be appropriate to show a picture of slave masters whipping slaves if someone asked for a picture from the 1850s United States? I didn't think so, either. I'm not mad with you, I don't want to start a fight, but I do ask that you please keep in mind your motives when selecting a picture like that. If that is being overly sensitive, guilty as charged.

post #1864 of 2072

Bought this vintage raglan tweed coat today:

 

post #1865 of 2072
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonCologne View Post

Bought this vintage raglan tweed coat today:





It looks like you've lost a lot of weight, DC. smile.gif
post #1866 of 2072
Quote:
Originally Posted by JermynStreet View Post

I don't want to argue, but if you're really going to play the historical perspective card, don't you think all 1.1 trillion terabytes of the internet could have provided you with a photo from that time period that wasn't from a concentration camp? By the way, I just did an image search for historical German clothing and came back with thousands of hits. It is important that you know that I was criticizing your choice of words, not you personally. I am not asking you to kiss the ground holocaust victims walk on, but choosing that picture of all pictures, I can't entirely believe that the choice was motivated purely to show a true example of historical German kamp kleidung. Would you think it would be appropriate to show a picture of slave masters whipping slaves if someone asked for a picture from the 1850s United States? I didn't think so, either. I'm not mad with you, I don't want to start a fight, but I do ask that you please keep in mind your motives when selecting a picture like that. If that is being overly sensitive, guilty as charged.

Actually many depictions of the typical American in first half of the 19th century featured the "peculiar instiution"
Take your pick:

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=Punch++political++cartoons+of+US+slave+owners&go=&qs=n&form=QBIR&pq=punch+political+cartoons+of+us+slave+owners&sc=0-0&sp=-1&sk=#a
post #1867 of 2072
Hey guys just added about 30 new tweed blazers to my Ebay and Etsy. Half off on shipping to SF members. Please message me if you have any additional questions or interest spam[1].gif

Now to the tweed porn.. (large amount of pictures)
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)























post #1868 of 2072
Quote:
Originally Posted by mactire View Post

Its common enough in parts of Europe, mostly worn by guys who are apprentice carpenters or other building trades who travel for a certain number of years to learn different skills and improve their English.

About 2 years ago, in a bar in Tralee, County Kerry, Ireland, I met 3 German guys who were doing just that. Travelling around Europe as a sort of apprenticeship, doing jobs to earn their keep, and dressed in a very antiquated style, almost like the Amish.
Quote:
The tradition of the journeyman years (German: auf der Walz sein) persisted well into the 1920s in German-speaking countries, but was set back by multiple events like Nazis banning the tradition, the postwar German economic boom making it seem too much of a burden, and in East Germany the lack of opportunities for work in an economic system based on Volkseigener Betrieb. Beginning in the late 1980s, renewed interest in tradition in general together with economic changes (especially after the fall of the Berlin Wall) have caused the tradition to gain wider acceptance. The tradition was brought back to life mostly unchanged from the medieval concept since the journeyman brotherhoods (German: Schächte, literally "shafts") still existed.

The journeyman brotherhoods had established a standard to ensure that wandering journeymen are not mistaken for tramps and vagabonds. The journeyman is required to be unmarried, childless and debt-free - so that the journeyman years will not be taken as a chance to run away from social obligations. In modern times the brotherhoods often require a police clearance. Additionally, journeymen are required to wear a specific uniform (German: Kluft) and to present themselves in a clean and friendly manner in public. This helps them to find shelter for the night and a ride to the next town.





The tradition is called "der Walz".
Quote:
Journeymen can be easily recognised on the street by their clothing. The carpenter's black hat has a broad brim; some professions use a black stovepipe hat or a cocked hat. The carpenters wear black bell-bottoms and a waistcoat and carry the Stenz, which is a traditional curled hiking pole. Since many professions have since converted to the uniform of the carpenters, many people in Germany believe that only carpenters go journeying, which is untrue – since the carpenter's uniform is best known and well received, it simply eases the journey.

The uniform is completed with a golden earring and golden bracelets - which could be sold in hard times and in the Middle Ages could be used to pay the gravedigger if any wanderer should die on his journey. The journeyman carries his belongings in a leather backpack called the Felleisen, but some medieval towns banned those (for the fleas in them) so that many journeyman used a coarse cloth to wrap up their belongings.

Also very important is, to never say costume, because a costume is something to change your self into someone else. But a uniform is something to represent something that someone is.
post #1869 of 2072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Odradek View Post


About 2 years ago, in a bar in Tralee, County Kerry, Ireland, I met 3 German guys who were doing just that. Travelling around Europe as a sort of apprenticeship, doing jobs to earn their keep, and dressed in a very antiquated style, almost like the Amish.




The tradition is called "der Walz".

"never say costume, because a costume is something to change your self into someone else. But a uniform is something to represent something that someone is"  I like that!  Having worn a uniform for nearly thirty years I can well appreciate how it comes to define much of what you are.

post #1870 of 2072
Where do you guys buy your tweed suits? Everyone always suggests thrifting, but I don't like how wide and padded the shoulders always are.
post #1871 of 2072
Quote:
Originally Posted by K. Nights View Post

Where do you guys buy your tweed suits? Everyone always suggests thrifting, but I don't like how wide and padded the shoulders always are.

They're not all like that, I've got a tweed J Press from 1965 that has no padding whatsoever in the shoulders.
Edited by eazye - 12/23/13 at 8:00pm
post #1872 of 2072

And I have a BB camelshair tweed that is quite Ivy in cut . . . as one would expect from BB.

post #1873 of 2072


 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #1874 of 2072
My wife just gave me this for Christmas. I love her.





post #1875 of 2072
Quote:
Originally Posted by capnwes View Post

My wife just gave me this for Christmas. I love her.






Sweet! I've thought about a Harris Tweed iPhone case, but don't like the prices.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › The Official Tweed Appreciation Thread