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The Official Tweed Appreciation Thread - Page 116

post #1726 of 2247

Wear it, break that bad boy in :)

post #1727 of 2247
Quote:
Originally Posted by velomane View Post


My understanding is that Huddersfieldcloth make it themselves, though I'm not 100% certain. It is cloth #H7441.

Everyone else, thanks for the input. I'll have my tailor shorten the sleeves and give it a pressing. As for the fit around the middle, I'm happy with it. We'll see how the jacket settles after a season.

 

Careful on shortening the sleeves!!  Sleeves can appear to be about 1/2" to an inch too long when new, as excess needs to be allowed for the wrinkles at the elbow.  Please wear it for a couple of days a week for a few months and then see if it needs to be shortened.

post #1728 of 2247
Thanks mactire, I will heed your advice, and gladly wear it a few times a week.
post #1729 of 2247
Quote:
Originally Posted by velomane View Post

Thanks mactire, I will heed your advice, and gladly wear it a few times a week.

 

Let us know how you get on.  The jacket looks great imo.  As a matter of interest do Mears offer canvassed jackets or any handwork at all?  

post #1730 of 2247
Quote:
Originally Posted by mactire View Post

 As a matter of interest do Mears offer canvassed jackets or any handwork at all?  

Darn, I meant to address this with my original post. Standby everyone, I'll let you know about the construction of my jacket later this weekend.
post #1731 of 2247
Quote:
Originally Posted by ravn View Post


I agree, lovly fabric. Is it the 36-K from Islay Wollen Mill K-range line or is it a cloth huddersfieldcloth.com have made exclusevly? I just irdeeed the k-36 directly from Islay.

These Huddersfield Cloth tweeds are the same as the Glenhunt Homespun bunch by Bateman & Ogden. Not sure exactly who weaves them, as i've only ever ordered through B&O, but they're most certainly the same

post #1732 of 2247
Quote:
Originally Posted by velomane View Post

As promised, pictures of my Mears jacket:


Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)




The fabric is a 17oz. tweed from huddersfieldcloth.com Here is what Lynne Mears said about them: "We have never used Huddersfield Cloth before, so I rang them to find out more. Apparently they have only been in business for a couple of years, did work for Dugdales and started their own business. I asked for swatch bunches and was told they were making them and would send when ready..."

Any comments regarding fit would be appreciated. Perhaps the arms could stand to be a little shorter. Do you gents think it would be a sartorial faux pas to leave them as is? Also, I've read that tweed jackets need some wearing to break in. How do you feel about that?

I'm quite happy with the service from Mears. Questions were promptly answered. The jacket took about a month from the time I ordered it to having it on my back. Regarding payment, they were happy to take a deposit with balance payable upon completion, pictures available upon request. I will be ordering from them again.

 

That's lovely cloth. I disagree about the sleeves needing to be shortened - I would leave them as they are.

Quote:
Originally Posted by OlSarge View Post
 


Yes.  And stand a tad straighter but definitely smile.  Have you had it dry cleaned or pressed yet?  My understanding is that that is the first thing you should do with a new MTM garment, especially one that came in the mail.   Does it need letting out a bit around the middle?  You won't know until the fabric has relaxed and settled down around you.  The sleeves, on the other hand, I would have shortened.  Lovely fabric, though . . .

 

Dry cleaned? Never do that to a new jacket

post #1733 of 2247
New tweed suit!

Obligatory apologies for iPics:



Deets:

post #1734 of 2247

Hello everyone. Just thought i'd introduce myself here – I know there's a separate place for introductions, but guess this'll be the place I most frequent. My name is Nathan and I run Tweed Addict. I've been dealing in vintage/used clothing for the last 9 years – mostly on eBay under the name Style Service. I've always sold men's tailored wear, with a particular emphasis on tweed and bespoke tailored suits. Around 6 years ago I started to have some tweed garments of my own made, which I just sold through our ebay store. I was based in West Yorkshire then, and used the same tailors that used to make for Hebden Cord, if anyone remembers them? Anyway, that all went well and we received quite a few orders for made to measure suits, until eventually I registered another company under the name Tweed Addict. Towards the end of last year we set up a website, and the response has been amazing. We've been very busy, mostly making 3 piece suits. We're currently having some ready-to-wear 3 piece suits made (just a small run of about 100), but our business remains largely made-to-measure. We're based in East London now, which means that more of our customers are able to come to our studio in person, peruse the bunches, and get measured up directly. We're also working with new tailors down here, which means we are able to offer a second fitting too, rather than just a finished garment, and the level of finishing they provide is excellent

 

Our made to measure service, like that of most others, involves the adaptation of a basic block pattern to a customers individual measurements. So it's not full bespoke in the sense of a brand new pattern being drawn up for each customer, but the fit is superior to any off the peg suit, and of course tweed choices, lining choices and all other details of the suit are completely determined by the customer

 

Quality has always been important to me. We only use pure new wool or luxury fibres, and all of our tweeds come from British mills. The garments are hand cut here in London, and put together with a combination of hand and machine stitching. We only use good quality linings (no nylon, polyester or other plastics) and genuine horn buttons. From my years of dealing in vintage clothing, I know what makes a good quality suit, and am always seeking to perfect our product

 

I saw some discussion here regarding construction methods, and thought it'd be good to let you know what we do. Currently our ready to wear and made to measure items have a fused chest construction, and though we don't compromise in other areas, this is largely an economical decision. We want to offer a great looking suit, with a good fit, in quality materials, but at a price that is more affordable than, say, Savile Row. We find that most of our customers are happy with this, and since tweed is a fairly robust cloth, it works very well. However, if you understand the advantages of half or fully canvassed construction, we are very happy to offer this too – the price is just a little higher

 

Anyway, sorry for such a long post. One last thing though; As with everyone else in this thread, I really love tweed. However, I don't believe that it only belongs in the country. We happily make shooting jackets, Norfolk jackets, breeks and whatever else our customers desire, but i think tweed is equally at home in the city, and our house silhouette is generally for a slim fitting, sharp, and modern looking suit that can be worn on a wide variety of occasions. Thanks and best wishes to you all, Nathan

post #1735 of 2247
That's a nice cloth. That tie really complements the green of the suit.
post #1736 of 2247
post #1737 of 2247
Quote:
Originally Posted by velomane View Post

That's a nice cloth. That tie really complements the green of the suit.

My thanks, sir. It just happened to be what I was wearing today, but I thought they worked, too.
post #1738 of 2247
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tweed Addict View Post
 

Our made to measure service, like that of most others, involves the adaptation of a basic block pattern to a customers individual measurements. So it's not full bespoke in the sense of a brand new pattern being drawn up for each customer, but the fit is superior to any off the peg suit, and of course tweed choices, lining choices and all other details of the suit are completely determined by the customer

 

Quality has always been important to me. We only use pure new wool or luxury fibres, and all of our tweeds come from British mills. The garments are hand cut here in London, and put together with a combination of hand and machine stitching. We only use good quality linings (no nylon, polyester or other plastics) and genuine horn buttons. From my years of dealing in vintage clothing, I know what makes a good quality suit, and am always seeking to perfect our product

 

I saw some discussion here regarding construction methods, and thought it'd be good to let you know what we do. Currently our ready to wear and made to measure items have a fused chest construction, and though we don't compromise in other areas, this is largely an economical decision. We want to offer a great looking suit, with a good fit, in quality materials, but at a price that is more affordable than, say, Savile Row. We find that most of our customers are happy with this, and since tweed is a fairly robust cloth, it works very well. However, if you understand the advantages of half or fully canvassed construction, we are very happy to offer this too – the price is just a little higher

 

 

 

 

Cheers for the extra information.  I took a look at your site there and one thing I would suggest is that you add that you can do canvassed/half-canvassed construction on request, or that you can offer handwork.  I think a lot of people would pay extra for handsewn buttonholes or working cuffs in particular.   Can you be measured and fitted by the cutter as well?

post #1739 of 2247
Fellow tweedsmen (is that a word) I often go to gardens, arboretums, mansions, blah blah blah, and love wearing sweaters and tweed jackets but often wear jeans because they are tough enough to not get hurt if they catch the odd thorn bush or brush.

Is there anything you recommend short of brush pants (like you would wear bird hunting) which I consider overkill?

Also I normally wear the browns and tans in fall, saving the grays for winter, but this 65 degree October day seemed perfect for the blue tweed sport coat.

I know the pics are crappy, seemed like a cool idea to take a shot in the mirror of the mansion I was poking around in. I decided the hat would be a good idea after I got a few drinks in me.

Boots are Prada riding boots.
Hat, jeans, and sweater are RL Polo.
Shirt is BB.
Belt is Coach.
Jacket is Gant.

J



post #1740 of 2247

The H-range tweeds from Islay Mill are thornproof-style sporting tweeds and can handle abrasion or snagging without incident. Very good for sporting trousers.

 

http://www.islaywoollenmill.co.uk/shop/tweeds/h-range/

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