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How much does culture/ethnicity affect the clothes you wear? - Page 6

post #76 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Holdfast View Post

Members will not be surprised to learn that this is not a common saying in the UK...

 

(,,, current 30C temperatures in October notwithstanding.)


Indian Summer was there yesterday and already gone..shog[1].gif
post #77 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by lasbar View Post

Indian Summer was there yesterday and already gone..shog[1].gif

Is 'Indian Summer' a commonly used phrase in the UK?

I would have guessed it to be only used in the US.
post #78 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gdot View Post

Is 'Indian Summer' a commonly used phrase in the UK?
I would have guessed it to be only used in the US.

It is used even in France...
post #79 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by lasbar View Post

It is used even in France...

More so than 'St Martin's Summer'? Saint-Martin d'été
post #80 of 92
It's an interesting thread and I've enjoyed reading some of the stories but is there a danger of getting a wee bit essentialist and introspective about things? Seems to me that a lot about SF would indicate the relative lack of relevance of culture/ethnicity. A quick glance at the WAYWRT thread clearly shows the difference in, for example, acceptable work attire but an awful lot of that seems to revolve around professions rather than national culture with some sticking to conservative suits and black shoes and others free to wear sports coats, brogues, button downs, etc. I know some of the latter are labelled 'American' but I'm guessing that they're less common on Wall Street than in a Mid-West law firm or college. Meantime, we've got some of the more youthful members from across Europe and Asia trying to emulate du jour Neopolitanism or New England preppy.
It's not that it's not relevant at all: every time I go back home to Scotland I feel this compelling urge to buy tweed (limited myself to a hat when visiting my mum in Edinburgh last week!shog[1].gif). And when I lived in Australia for many years, I continued to be rather smarter and often more formally dressed than friends and colleagues, and was rather more identifiably British (or possibly London) (I love Australia and miss it heaps but, guys, the shoes! Get it sorted, I beg you!). But similarly I don't spend my days in a kilt (though freely admit to owning one) and a tam.
post #81 of 92

Quote:

Originally Posted by Oleg View Post

Seems to me that a lot about SF would indicate the relative lack of relevance of culture/ethnicity. A quick glance at the WAYWRT thread clearly shows the difference in, for example, acceptable work attire but an awful lot of that seems to revolve around professions rather than national culture with some sticking to conservative suits and black shoes and others free to wear sports coats, brogues, button downs, etc.


That is very true. But my idea of culture isn't fundamentally 'ethnic' or 'national' - those norms you refer too are also 'cultural' in a broad sense, or perhaps I should say 'social'. The question is how much we buy into those. You can certainly see social norms at work on this forum (and before anyone jumps on me, that doesn't mean I think they are 'bad').

 

post #82 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingMonkey View Post

Quote:

That is very true. But my idea of culture isn't fundamentally 'ethnic' or 'national' - those norms you refer too are also 'cultural' in a broad sense, or perhaps I should say 'social'. The question is how much we buy into those. You can certainly see social norms at work on this forum (and before anyone jumps on me, that doesn't mean I think they are 'bad').

 


Of course and I understand full well the scope of the concept of 'culture' (being a social science academic and all that smile.gif). But the thread to date has mostly revolved around ethnicity and national culture. Of course, you can dismiss the influence of class, for e.g., but insofar is it has an impact, so much of its influence is about buying into an image or lifestyle, be it a WASPish New Englander or English country gent, rather than as a true reflection of one's roots.
post #83 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Holdfast View Post

Recently posted by vox in WAYWRN regarding some of the looks therein:

 

 

This strikes a chord with some of the themes of this thread, I think. It references the self-reinforcing coherence of dress imposed by an ethnic/cultural norm.

 

In today's world of a less culturally-rooted, and perhaps more anomic, world, we draw coherent inspiration from designers... and perhaps even more dysfunctionally, from internet style tumblers and message boards.

 

Is developing a sense of coherent expression/insight into one's style inevitably associated with patronising a narrowing range of outfitters? I know I've certainly massively cut down on the range of places I buy from, but that doesn't necessarily mean that I'm getting better at expressing myself sartorially (obviously, I think I am, but that's no guide...!). I guess it depends on what prompts you to opt to narrow your range, and what is the target range.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Parker View Post

The combination of people I'm seeing and the decision to blend in or stand out have much more influence on my dress than my ethnicity or cultural background. Of course we all have backgrounds that inform our ideas and preferences for certain styles, but I like to think we all have some kind of free will to pick and choose things from whatever era or cultural group (even an internet cultural group) that appeals to us. I do, however, avoid certain things that I might otherwise like on other guys (bright colors, pinstripes, designer stuff) because either I don't want to be perceived a certain way or something just doesn't "feel like me" -- which I suppose could be some cultural or ethnic influence.

 


I think there are two issues at hand: One is the widespread demise of tailored clothing in the U.S.; the other is the massive broadening of potential influences and clothing sources. So we have guys with little exposure to tailored clothing, with no real style of their own, suddenly presented with all the world. And that's overwhelming. It's like a kid turned loose in a candy shop.

The more successful guys, IMO, tend to build from a base, to diversify gradually, to incorporate new elements into an existing style. I dig both John Steed's waisted, Edwardian dandy stuff and James Bond's stripped-down "Dr. No" gear, but I can't wear both at once. Just can't be done. Partly because they're diametrically opposed and partly because I'm not a fictional secret agent in the 1960s. I can take elements of both those and make them my own, but it's much easier to incorporate disparate elements if you understand fit and proportion already. And to do it successfully it takes a certain analytical approach to clothing: Does this make sense in the context of my personality and where it will be worn? Does it send the message I want to send?

See, I love eclectic. I love bohemian. But I love it when it expresses an appreciation and understanding of disparate elements. When it's just a bunch of stuff thrown together in a way that doesn't make sense and doesn't quite fit, it rings hollow, like a college freshman trying to convince you he's deep. You can see through it. It's fine for a guy at Pitti to look like he's at Pitti, but it jars when that sort of flamboyant gear is contrasted against the muddy tones of a workplace bathroom. Parker's exactly on point when he talks about clothing "feeling like you." But what happens when you're not sure who the "you" is?

So no, I don't think a guy needs to limit himself to a narrow range of outfitters, but I do think he needs to figure out his style, above and beyond what's hot on the Internet. And with that, I suspect, will typically come a certain narrowing of the wardrobe.
post #84 of 92
As I have only stopped recently wearing a striped shirt and a beret while riding my bike in between two onions delivery , this thread is particularly interesting to me..
post #85 of 92

Quote:

Originally Posted by DocHolliday View Post
See, I love eclectic. I love bohemian. But I love it when it expresses an appreciation and understanding of disparate elements. But when it's just a bunch of stuff thrown together in a way that doesn't make sense and doesn't quite fit, it rings hollow, like a college freshman trying to convince you he's deep. You can see through it. It's fine for a guy at Pitti to look like he's at Pitti, but it jars when that sort of flamboyant gear is contrasted against the muddy tones of a workplace bathroom. Parker's exactly on point when talks about clothing "feeling like you." But what happens when you're not sure who the "you" is?


This is exactly what I am struggling with. I've always been convinced there's a kind of 'fantasy' to clothing, but there's got to be some connection to some kind of 'conventional' context and a knowledge of how much you are departing from it and why. In this context, cultural rootlessness can give rise to a desire to be eclectic, but it isn't just since coming here that I've started to realise that just throwing a load of things together, even with a system that makes internal sense to you, doesn't communicate to other people in the same way. Now of course we all have different aesthetic conceptions and the community we may be communicating with in the real world of our daily lives and work is certainly not the same one as on here, but if the stuff one is wearing needs an awful lot of further explanation, it is failing on at least one level from the start.

 

post #86 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by lasbar View Post

As I have only stopped recently wearing a striped shirt and a beret while riding my bike in between two onions delivery , this thread is particularly interesting to me..

biggrin.gif
post #87 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocHolliday View Post

See, I love eclectic. I love bohemian. But I love it when it expresses an appreciation and understanding of disparate elements. When it's just a bunch of stuff thrown together in a way that doesn't make sense and doesn't quite fit, it rings hollow, like a college freshman trying to convince you he's deep.
Too much of the 'why' behind the idea is often lacking today. It's akin to my local Starbucks that decorates with a 'Mardi Gras' theme for the calendar week in which Mardi Gras occurs ... never mind Ash Wednesday. Of course they haven't a clue what Mardi Gras is all about ... it becomes nothing more than an excuse to have fun. Then there is the store that celebrates the 12 days of Christmas beginning on 14 December. This is what I call 'style without content.'

Mark Bauerlein's title, The Dumbest Generation, isn't far off base when describing the a vast majority of folks under the age of 30 ... and perhaps a majority in the prior generation ... or two. We've reached the day when ignorance is prized above knowledge.
Edited by RSS - 10/5/11 at 2:22am
post #88 of 92
This thread provides a living, breathing, example of how much one is affected by the 'norms' around them.

http://www.styleforum.net/t/212411/what-were-you-wearing-10-years-ago-waywrn-x/200_20#post_4860234

It should provide some fodder for comment at the very least.
post #89 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by tone76 View Post

Australian dress is very casual. Oddly enough, despite the fact Australians are proud of being casual and egalitarian, they are some of the most slavish brand whores on the planet. Formal dress is often seen as a chore. It's not unusual for a male in Australia to happily drop $200+ on a hoodie, but baulk at spending half that for a suit. facepalm.gif
There are three broad categories:
*snipped*

I never commented on this great post. I'm Australian too and this is an accurate (and hilarious) picture of clothes and the man here. Nice one OP!

As an aside, I was back in Wagga Wagga (where I'm from, in the country) at Easter this year and I saw a lot of people out at the pub after a day at the races. I was amazed by how well they were dressed: moleskins; RM Williams chelsea boots; nicely fitting, good quality shirts. None (or much less) of the absolute shit that passes for 'dressed up' fashion here in Melbourne. It was kind of heartening...
post #90 of 92

An Indian ethnic wear means a traditional indian dress like salwar kameez, punjabi suits, men kurta pyjamas,saree and Sherwani etc For some special events and occasions.The different culture have a different Traditional dresses according to their state and as well their country.

 

Being a New Delhi in India, At here, it is very rare to see someone  in a simple dress like shirts and paints  which is considered a common in every mens wardrobe , It is a common dress not good for young people. Here in delhi young people can change their dressing sense according to the occasions. Young people who wear like T- shirts, jeans these are the common dresses.they have change his taste for showcase their personality.people who can wear the kurta pyjamas and Sherwani here are perceived as rich, some time they are crazy about these dresses.

 

Kurta is a very flexible dress that can be worn on formal as well as informal occasions. You can even wear them at work. Most Indian men prefer wearing kurta pajama during the night. Well, it is due to its extreme comfort that it has become a popular choice amongst the other nightwear available. Traditional kurta pyjamas have been increasingly gaining momentum amongst the youngsters, who prefer wearing them in their informal social gatherings, with the basic idea of maintaining a distinctive style of their own Personality.

 

 

 Due to its high popularity in the region of Punjab,Haryana and also in their villages.The fashion of kurta pyjamas in India is not new. Since the past many few centuries, men have been wearing this wonderful attire.

 

For More about Indian ethnic wear

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