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Post Interview Questions - Page 3

post #31 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by NAMOR View Post

+1. but what are the odds that the person interviewing you actually held the same position youre applying for. transitions are so common place these days that I doubt this question is directly applicable. maybe im just over thinking this

You can still ask the question, but tweak it a bit: "I know you haven't held this position I'm applying for, but in general, what is something you know now that you wish you knew when you were in an entry-level position?"

But as stevent touched up on, for a lot of on-campus recruiting, you'll get younger alumni analysts/associates who have held those entry-level positions but have been promoted.

Good luck with all your interviews, guys! My company is recruiting right now and, boy, it's a tough market for the 2012 grads.. We had 500+ applicants for 3 spots..
post #32 of 53
Here are a few I've asked...

1. What's your favorite part about X (this company, your job, etc)... I like it becuase it gets them thinking about positive things. it's only mildly informative/useful but it shows you're looking forward to the job.

2. Something around career progression. I'm careful with this one since it may make you sound like a flight risk or someone who's more interested in the job above you... so I phrase it like 'I'm really looking to grow and develop my skills so I can really contribute, what sort of development and training do they do around here?". This shows them you're in for the long run, you want to improve, etc and it also tells you if the company invests in their people or not...


3. Maybe not quite in these words, but something along the lines of 'what do you think it takes to really be successful in this role?', not to make you sound like you don't understand the job, but sort of to get a sense for the kind of person or attributes that will work for them, which will give you a very good idea of if you want to work for them. The reason I also like it is that it makes them realize you're interviewing them too, so suddenly they start trying to sell you on why you should work there.
post #33 of 53
Some very good insight.

Had my first interview post-graduation for an intern position.

Got interviewed by the CEO's S/O, employee, then CEO.

Interviews went well, I wrote down some questions some of which I did not get a chance to ask (I forgot). Don't really have any good questions to ask per say for input here, but during my interview with the owner of the company, I was simply caught off-guard in a sense that left me a bit speechless. The CEO was very charismatic, and even cussed several times when explaining to me about questions I had. Does this happen often? I was simply nodding my head half the time listening to him telling me stories essentially about characteristics he looks for in "candidates".

Anyways, after the interview was over, I let him know directly that I will contact them with my answer to whether I will intern or not. [To be honest, I did not graduate to come out and intern...was hoping for a salary at least, or the very least, a starting income].

So my question is, how long do I have to let them know before I drop off their radar? 1 week? 1.5? Or 2-3 days. And how do you let an employer know if you do not want the position? Just thank them for the interview opportunity and nicely decline?
post #34 of 53
great advice master-classter. thanks!

gettoasty - the sooner the better. if you already know youre not interested then tell them now. but then again, if you dont have anything else going on at this moment, then consider accepting.
post #35 of 53
Yes, the only reason I would consider is b/c I do not have much else lined up.

But the CEO made it quite clear that it will be a full-time commitment. Of course, I will be looking for other jobs during. The problem is how will I make the move to leave if something better comes up?

Main reason why I do not want to join is because the CEO was pretty patronizing/condescending, saying recent grads even from top schools don't know shit (CEO has bad experience in past shoring up the resources and time investing in interns). And playing the guilt card about leaving for a better job. In my head I was like "WTF dude, I am young of course I am going to keep my options open if something better turns up". ffffuuuu.gif

It was just not very inviting and off-putting. I feel very forced like I have no choice.
post #36 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by gettoasty View Post

Yes, the only reason I would consider is b/c I do not have much else lined up.
But the CEO made it quite clear that it will be a full-time commitment. Of course, I will be looking for other jobs during. The problem is how will I make the move to leave if something better comes up?
Main reason why I do not want to join is because the CEO was pretty patronizing/condescending, saying recent grads even from top schools don't know shit (CEO has bad experience in past shoring up the resources and time investing in interns). And playing the guilt card about leaving for a better job. In my head I was like "WTF dude, I am young of course I am going to keep my options open if something better turns up". ffffuuuu.gif
It was just not very inviting and off-putting. I feel very forced like I have no choice.

If you're an intern you would work 3 months? 6 months? You can always move on then.
post #37 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenFrog View Post

One question I asked everyone for every single interview that was well-receive every single timewas, "What do you know now that you wish you knew when you were in my position (as in any entry-level job in general, or the specific position you're applying for that the interviewer held previously but has been promoted since)?"
Most of the time, you'll get some pretty generic answers, but that's after the interviewers actually spend a couple seconds thinking in their heads what to say, as if they've been caught off guard. After a few seconds of more silence, they'll stall and say, "wow, that's a really good question.. hmm" and then they'll give you a pretty generic answer. The generic answer is not the point. The point is you've made an impression where you caught the interviewer off guard, in a good way.
I've noticed that the more senior the interviewer is (and older in age), the more generic the advice is. It tends to be more general in nature and kind of life-specific; not specific to the position you're interviewing for. The younger interviewers tend to give you the position-specific advice.
Either way, it's a question that has been well received by everyone I've asked it to. I also tend to leave it as my last question, after already having asked some position/company-specific questions. It's a good closer question.

+1, "thats a great question!" bounce2.gif

thanks, GF! worked like a charm
post #38 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by NAMOR View Post

+1, "thats a great question!" bounce2.gif
thanks, GF! worked like a charm

Yep worked for me quite well multiple times as well this week.


This isn't that related but what's the best way to deal with a recruiter that does not seem to be interested? (Was looking at the clock the whole time, questions did not seem to connect one random question followed by something else completely unrelated. I was in a morning interview, no where close to lunch time)
post #39 of 53
Glad to hear it 'worked!' smile.gif
post #40 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevent View Post

Yep worked for me quite well multiple times as well this week.
This isn't that related but what's the best way to deal with a recruiter that does not seem to be interested? (Was looking at the clock the whole time, questions did not seem to connect one random question followed by something else completely unrelated. I was in a morning interview, no where close to lunch time)
try exposing a nipple. wakes them up right away
post #41 of 53
This seemed like a relevant thread:

So I just went through a second round phone interview, and got asked back for the final on-site interview. They also want to call me and "get my feedback on the phone interview." Is this normal? Does it have some particular meaning? Not really sure where to go with this. Obviously I'm going to do it, but trying to prepare for it first.
post #42 of 53
Apparently it was 99% a conversation to set up the interview and discuss details. Weird.
post #43 of 53
Thread Starter 
At least it means that they are interested in you.
post #44 of 53
This is a great thread. While I'm still in my second of five years at university, I'm going to keep this thread in mind whenever I interview for summer internships and the like.

Really a lot of fantastic advice here.
post #45 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenFrog View Post

One question I asked everyone for every single interview that was well-received every single time was, "What do you know now that you wish you knew when you were in my position (as in any entry-level job in general, or the specific position you're applying for that the interviewer held previously but has been promoted since)?"
Most of the time, you'll get some pretty generic answers, but that's after the interviewers actually spend a couple seconds thinking in their heads what to say, as if they've been caught off guard. After a few seconds of more silence, they'll stall and say, "wow, that's a really good question.. hmm" and then they'll give you a pretty generic answer. The generic answer is not the point. The point is you've made an impression where you caught the interviewer off guard, in a good way.
I've noticed that the more senior the interviewer is (and older in age), the more generic the advice is. It tends to be more general in nature and kind of life-specific; not specific to the position you're interviewing for. The younger interviewers tend to give you the position-specific advice.
Either way, it's a question that has been well received by everyone I've asked it to. I also tend to leave it as my last question, after already having asked some position/company-specific questions. It's a good closer question.

I'm actually interviewing in a couple of hours, so you damn well know I'm going to ask this as the last question.

Thanks, GF!
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