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Christmas eve/day menus

post #1 of 30
Thread Starter 
Let us salivate by sharing your menus...

I am so envious of those of you who have easy access to truffles, fresh foie gras, fresh game, tropical fruit, I'll stop here.
post #2 of 30
Well, we have no truffles, etc on the menu but I think this sounds good non-the-less:

Roast leg of lamb with a pureed garlic rub.
Spinach gratin
Some sort of potatoes
Chocolate bread pudding with a vanilla sauce

and that's all we've come up with so far. We should probably firm up the rest of the menu. Like the desert. And while I realize there are potatoes on the menu, I'd like there to be some sort of rolls or bread or something. Suggestions?

bob
post #3 of 30
post #4 of 30
Damnit, Huntsman, good timing. The second I read that an image of my wife saying last night "I think I'll make popovers"...well, popped into my head. Yup, that's the stuff.

b
post #5 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdawson808
Well, we have no truffles, etc on the menu but I think this sounds good non-the-less:

Roast leg of lamb with a pureed garlic rub.
Spinach gratin
Some sort of potatoes
Chocolate bread pudding with a vanilla sauce

and that's all we've come up with so far. We should probably firm up the rest of the menu. Like the desert. And while I realize there are potatoes on the menu, I'd like there to be some sort of rolls or bread or something. Suggestions?

bob

It does sound very nice. It's just that, for Christmas eve, I always crave dishes/ingredients I don't have on a regular basis year round, or things I typically associate with the holidays in my country, like a great variety of fresh oysters and seashells. I'm very much landlocked, here.

How do you get the garlic rub not to burn/get a bitter taste while roasting the lamb? What is in the spinach gratin?

For Christmas day, I'm thinking about making a simple chicken or fish waterzooi, or subject my husband and friends to beef tongue.

Christmas eve is more tricky, it needs to be out of the ordinary. I'm out of ideas right now.
post #6 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabienne

How do you get the garlic rub not to burn/get a bitter taste while roasting the lamb? What is in the spinach gratin?



I'm not sure about the spinach gratin--my wife is making that. But the lamb is mine. And here's the major risk: I've never made it before. So hopefully it will turn out fine. I'm pretty good with meat (not so much with baking, though my choc chip cookies that I altered are amazing) so I have high hopes.

For Christmas eve we have no special plans. I think the intention is simply to stay at home, watch a movie, and maybe have a meal of appetizers or hors d'heuvres (that's probably spelled wrong) and drinks. We need something quite for Xmas eve.

Tonight we're heading to DC for dinner and a show.


bob
post #7 of 30
Nobody is making turdunken?!?
post #8 of 30
Fabienne, my guess is that you would simply apply the rub towards the end of cooking, in the same way that you add the garlic last when sautéing with onions. Garlic is fairly potent so it likely doesn't need to be applied from the start to transfer its flavor to the roast. Of course, you could insert slivers of garlic into the roast itself if you really like the taste of garlic. This is all just theory from someone that's been cooking for a whole 3 months.
post #9 of 30
Maybe this will help. I perused the recipe again. You coat the inside of the roast with the puree and then roll it back up and tie it up. So it's on the inside and maybe that "insulates" it? I'm not sure but that's my guess.


bob
post #10 of 30
my dad is making his standard roast beef for x-mas. some good eatin'!

-Jeff
post #11 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek
Nobody is making turdunken?!?

Don't be ridiculous. Turducken is only appropriate for Thanksgiving.
post #12 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek
Fabienne, my guess is that you would simply apply the rub towards the end of cooking, in the same way that you add the garlic last when sautéing with onions. Garlic is fairly potent so it likely doesn't need to be applied from the start to transfer its flavor to the roast. Of course, you could insert slivers of garlic into the roast itself if you really like the taste of garlic. This is all just theory from someone that's been cooking for a whole 3 months.

GQgeek, There's really nothing wrong with that old method, it always yields beautiful results and makes the house smell wonderful.

Mr. Dawson, I could see, indeed, how the garlic would be shielded. Let us know how it turns out!

In the meantime, I have decided to do an entire Belgian meal for Monday's lunch.
post #13 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek
Nobody is making turdunken?!?
Oh, nasty.
post #14 of 30
Turkey and roasted ham. Mashed potatoes with gravy. Yams with maple syrum. Pumpkin pie. The regular traditional Christmas stuff.
post #15 of 30
I have six pounds of roast in the oven right now preparing for Christmas Eve. It ends up (after three separate trips to the oven) being sort of a shredded beef that is served on buns; very flavorful. My kids will be over, and rather than spend time cooking while they're here, I set this out as sort of a buffet. Other must-haves at my bachelor pad: Mexican Wedding Cakes, PB cookies topped with Hershey's Kisses, chocolate-dipped potato chips and several large bottles of Kahlua!
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