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Which Interview Outfit Is Better? With PICS - Page 6

post #76 of 99

True, the fit is far from perfect. But if you are going with this suit, I think you should get rid of the tie clip. Cufflinks and pocket square are ok, but no pocket square and single cuffs is simpler and correct for an interview too.

post #77 of 99
French cuffs are mainstream, but the mainstream dresses pretty badly.

Honestly, french cuffs look pretty high faluting. There are formal clothes, and there are white collar work clothes, neither are the other. People who wear French cuffs and true formalwear for work are more likely to be serving you dinner.
post #78 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post

Honestly, french cuffs look pretty high faluting. There are formal clothes, and there are white collar work clothes, neither are the other. People who wear French cuffs and true formalwear for work are more likely to be serving you dinner.


You do realize that's a very North American point of view.
post #79 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by pkiula View Post



You do realize that's a very North American point of view.

How so? French cuffs are also unacceptable for work dress in Asia, and parts of Europe as well. Beyond that, I think no junior level employee should really be wearing French cuffs or colored shirts.
post #80 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post


How so? French cuffs are also unacceptable for work dress in Asia, and parts of Europe as well. Beyond that, I think no junior level employee should really be wearing French cuffs or colored shirts.

Why on earth not?
post #81 of 99
The trousers look a bit short and there appears to be some Bermuda Triangle.

For an interview at a US bank, super-conventional is probably best.

You're really a good-looking young man, though…
post #82 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by uniesse View Post


Why on earth not?

because you're there to work, not show them the finest of man silks?
post #83 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Testudo_Aubreii View Post

I think we see a difference of interview philosophies between those who think the hank, links, and bar are fine and those who think they'll hurt. Those who say they're fine take the view that when being the applicant in a dark-suited job interview, one should strive to present a sober and professional suited image. Period. Those who say they'll hurt instead think that one should strive to present what any probable interviewer will accept as a sober and professional suited image. They also think that in order to achieve that, you have to dress in the way the interviewer has most frequently seen dark-suited men of the appropriate social status dress in for professional situations. I.e., you have to aim for the modal dark-suited professional ensemble that your interviewers have seen on people in the rough social status from which most of the competitive candidates for the job are pulled.

Which philosophy is true? I don't know. Which philosophy is better to adopt? For me, the first, because the second requires too much work. The details of ten-year fashions in dress don't interest me much: and if you adopt the second philosophy, you have to devote serious thought to those details. But if you do like following fashion--i.e., real fashion, trends in what's modally worn in social strata in the past ten years or so--then it's probably not a cost to you at all.

(I chose 10-year fashions because those are the ones most likely to have shaped the outlook of all probable interviewers.)


You do almost no thought. You wear a dark suit, black shoes and belt, white shirt and a conservative tie. You don't add dandy accessories like pocket squares and tie clips.
post #84 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post


How so? French cuffs are also unacceptable for work dress in Asia, and parts of Europe as well. Beyond that, I think no junior level employee should really be wearing French cuffs or colored shirts.


Which Asia do you have experience in? Almost all colonial countries are taught that French cuffs (or double cuffs) are the classic kind of shirt that anyone who can afford should wear. And in the non-colonial countries, such as Japan and Korea, double cuffs are considered superb form too.

I've lived and worked extensively in EMEA and the same applies. Younger people these days might wear simpler shirts. But almost everyone I have met in any industry of purport doesn't mind the double cuff at all, in fact considers it a symbol of classic satorial taste.

Not sure what you were on about "color". Colored shirts? Surely no one's suggesting purple or spotty brown shirts. But light blue, greys, stripes, maybe even subtle checks (NOT in interview situations, but daily wear) are perfectly acceptable. If your skin supports it, then light pink, light beige, etc are fine too. Of course, white and light blue remain perennial and "safe" bets.

There's a certain lack of such classic sense in the US and Canada, which is fine too. But please don't hoist these as diktats for everyone.
post #85 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post


because you're there to work, not show them the finest of man silks?


Great, this argument is like saying to a woman not to wear any dress other than a matronly long skirt because "you're not there to show a bikini".

Man silks were not in discussion. Shirts with classic cuffs and classic colors such as light blue are not so far removed from a single button cuff and white color respectively so as to warrant being a "man silk".
post #86 of 99
If you're a quant doing modeling work for pe or hedge funds, they honestly won't care what kind of suit you're wearing unless it's over the top & looks like a costume from a period movie. My only tip is not to wear strong cologne! My friend was part of a team hiring for a strategic management consultancy and he said one candidate reeked of musky "manly" perfume. It reminded him of his college roomie and it became a butt of jokes the rest of the week.
post #87 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post


How so? French cuffs are also unacceptable for work dress in Asia, and parts of Europe as well. Beyond that, I think no junior level employee should really be wearing French cuffs or colored shirts.
Where in Asia & Europe?
post #88 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by musicguy View Post


I don't think it's too small, maybe very slightly. What you've noticed are open quarters, showing shirt below the buttoning. If anything, it's just too short and the button stance is too high.



Open quarters? From a tailor's blog....

Quarters
The internet has a way of expanding the English language and ever since discovering the tailored clothing forums I have also encountered a term that I had never heard used outside of the internet, and that was "quarters". As in, a way of describing the shape of the front of the coat. Whereas in tailoring circles, or the ones I have always frequented, anyway, have generally referred to a "straight front" or a "cutaway front", the internet usage has people referring to "open quarters" and "closed quarters". Which sounds more like an architectural term to me, but whatever. I never understood where the term might have originated, suspecting one of the forum stars may have coined it and it become an iTailor meme.
post #89 of 99
So how about a bit of Sunday fun? I am going to post some shots of the model from Hart Schaffner and Marx (which I consider pretty classic and middle of the road) where the guy is breaking one of the "rules." Who would grade the guy down and/ or not hire him based on the outfit?

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post #90 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post


How so? French cuffs are also unacceptable for work dress in Asia, and parts of Europe as well. Beyond that, I think no junior level employee should really be wearing French cuffs or colored shirts.

That is really funny! First I thought you are serious...
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