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The Tailors' Thread: Fit Feedback and Alteration Suggestions - Page 280

post #4186 of 5378
Quote:
Originally Posted by OTCtailor View Post

Still too short to be worn casually but I suppose that's preference. Definitely need to relax or lower the armhole depth some or increase the chest of the shirt. Maybe a little of both. Sleeves that are slimmed require a higher armhole and therefore maybe harder to slim without the pulling effect across the chest.
Can luxire adjust for posture? If so, that needs to be correct. Something else you can do is take a measurement of your fullback from one armpit to the other. Add a little for ease since you're going no pleats and that would clean up across the back. Depending on how you stand or how much "shape" there is between your waist and hips will/should also factor into how long you get the shirt made and perhaps what has to be done to it on the back end. Shirts shouldn't have excessively curved side seams because it takes the fabric off grain and creates a lot of distortion. To counter this or adjust for more "shape" or closely fitted shirts for the slim/modern trend, darts need to be added. Personally, I add them myself and I do it right behind or in front of the side seams so that the natural size of my arm tends to hide the the dart from view. 

Hi OtcTailor,

Can you describe more by what you mean by taking fabric off the grain in more layman terms? I'm also in the process of trying to get a closer fit to reduce billowing when tucked and trying to understand these two methods.

Thanks,
DD
post #4187 of 5378

Hey, 

 

I just got this suitsupply suit and was curious about the fit. This is their smallest(36s) and I fear it still might be too big for me in the shoulders. Any help would be greatly appreciated. 

 

http://imgur.com/a/Tm81o#4

post #4188 of 5378
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkDestiny View Post

Hi OtcTailor,

Can you describe more by what you mean by taking fabric off the grain in more layman terms? I'm also in the process of trying to get a closer fit to reduce billowing when tucked and trying to understand these two methods.

Thanks,
DD

All fabric for shirts is woven which means there are warp and weft threads or length wise and cross wise. Like a micro grid, if you will. A garment that is well tailored always hangs 'on grain' or straight in line with the long grain of the weave. So how does this occur when you realize the body has curves? Well, that it's the art of fit, in essence. So dress shirts being made of cotton are naturally with less drape than the fine suiting wools we see today. If any garment made of woven fabric (as opposed to knit) has excessive curving in its seams, it will pull and buckle because of the natural structure created by the weave. Seams, darts, canvassing, stretching, and shrinking are all tools we use to put shape into a garment while still keeping it hanging on a body without any distortion to the grain. Pardon the super long exp, but in a nutshell, on a cotton dress shirt, the stands need to be relatively straight as opposed to more curved. We add curve subtly over multiple seams if there is a lot of shape in the body. Easy with a modern suit because look at all those seams! On a shirt we have 2 side seams. Thus the necessity of darts on a body that has more shape. So then, if you have say prominent lower back curve etc, better to dart the shirt than over-curve the sides to better the fit. So when building a shirt online. Do not do like +5 over the chest, +3 over the waist, and +4 or +5 over the hips because you will get a horribly curved shirt. Instead, go with +3 all over if you're exceptionally slim, +4 all over if you just want slim fit. +5 all over for slim/relaxed fit. To adjust from there based on preference, you add darts. Adding darts after the shirt is made may give you more control over the fit because they don't make the shirt at, say, +4 ask over then add darts by your request to make the waist more like plus 3. No, instead if you ask for +4 all over with darts, you get just that. Also, if you ask for days from the maker, you have no control where they put them. Have a tailor do it and you can put them exactly where you need them.
post #4189 of 5378
Pardon the odd wording. I'm typing from a mobile phone.
post #4190 of 5378

C&C


Edited by daizawaguy - 12/17/13 at 1:11pm
post #4191 of 5378

delete


Edited by daizawaguy - 12/19/13 at 4:23pm
post #4192 of 5378
Quote:
Originally Posted by OTCtailor View Post


  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
All fabric for shirts is woven which means there are warp and weft threads or length wise and cross wise. Like a micro grid, if you will. A garment that is well tailored always hangs 'on grain' or straight in line with the long grain of the weave. So how does this occur when you realize the body has curves? Well, that it's the art of fit, in essence. So dress shirts being made of cotton are naturally with less drape than the fine suiting wools we see today. If any garment made of woven fabric (as opposed to knit) has excessive curving in its seams, it will pull and buckle because of the natural structure created by the weave. Seams, darts, canvassing, stretching, and shrinking are all tools we use to put shape into a garment while still keeping it hanging on a body without any distortion to the grain. Pardon the super long exp, but in a nutshell, on a cotton dress shirt, the stands need to be relatively straight as opposed to more curved. We add curve subtly over multiple seams if there is a lot of shape in the body. Easy with a modern suit because look at all those seams! On a shirt we have 2 side seams. Thus the necessity of darts on a body that has more shape. So then, if you have say prominent lower back curve etc, better to dart the shirt than over-curve the sides to better the fit. So when building a shirt online. Do not do like +5 over the chest, +3 over the waist, and +4 or +5 over the hips because you will get a horribly curved shirt. Instead, go with +3 all over if you're exceptionally slim, +4 all over if you just want slim fit. +5 all over for slim/relaxed fit. To adjust from there based on preference, you add darts. Adding darts after the shirt is made may give you more control over the fit because they don't make the shirt at, say, +4 ask over then add darts by your request to make the waist more like plus 3. No, instead if you ask for +4 all over with darts, you get just that. Also, if you ask for days from the maker, you have no control where they put them. Have a tailor do it and you can put them exactly where you need them.

 

 

Hi OTCTailor.

 

Thank you for all your information. It really helps. The great part about Luxire is that they do allow full customization, so I can add as many darts wherever I please. It's just tough for the less savy or knowledgable. I had a few more question about darts over curved side seams.

 

1) Am I sort of correct in understanding that adding a dart to a shirt is like adding another seam to help with the curves to reduce all the pulling and buckling that would result from putting it all on curving the side seams?

 

2) In your post, you mention putting darts near the side seams whereas the standard location seems to be the vertical line from the shoulder blades in the back. I'm sure there's a reason why the darts are generally there instead of your suggestion. Is it just tougher to do, or are there disadvantages to putting darts near the side seams?

 

Thanks,

DD

post #4193 of 5378

Sorry I only got back pictures of this new tux (smallest size from ehaberdasher). Does it look too big, or is it salvageable? The shoulders feel pretty close to me, maybe an extra centimeter overhang on each side. Thanks for any feedback!

 

*

post #4194 of 5378

Hi,

 

I'm new to suit tailoring.

 

I notice that my suit shoulder and back is quite badly done. I have the shoulder divot too. I would like to know if it's fixable and how?

 

 

post #4195 of 5378

lets say i had a 1cm diagonal cut (~10 degrees from vertical) across a pair of cotton pants in this pinstripe pattern, cutting across several columns. how would a competent tailor fix this? would they just pucker the cut inwards and sew that together? or would they use a patch of similar fabric overtop?

 

post #4196 of 5378
#1) you are correct

#2) it all depends on where you need the shaping. Sometimes closer to the center back works and sometimes closer to the side seams works. There is no functional disadvantage either way. In fact, on all my own shirts, I actually dart under the arm forward of the side seam because I have a lot of space under there created by wider lats. It makes the front fit better.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkDestiny View Post

Hi OTCTailor.

Thank you for all your information. It really helps. The great part about Luxire is that they do allow full customization, so I can add as many darts wherever I please. It's just tough for the less savy or knowledgable. I had a few more question about darts over curved side seams.

1) Am I sort of correct in understanding that adding a dart to a shirt is like adding another seam to help with the curves to reduce all the pulling and buckling that would result from putting it all on curving the side seams?

2) In your post, you mention putting darts near the side seams whereas the standard location seems to be the vertical line from the shoulder blades in the back. I'm sure there's a reason why the darts are generally there instead of your suggestion. Is it just tougher to do, or are there disadvantages to putting darts near the side seams?

Thanks,
DD
post #4197 of 5378
It needs more room over the blades. Have a tailor release the CB seam a little from the top of the neck down to the middle of the back. Maybe 3/8" total released. Then the back part of the shoulder seam only can be released about .25" or so max. The neck home must be shrunk in to match the collar size but it may provide a bit of shape over your upper back to relax the stress placed on the back of the armhole creating the divot. The other more extreme option is to have a tailor remove the sleeves and shorten the sleeve cap along with the aforementioned.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ganner123 View Post

Hi,

I'm new to suit tailoring.

I notice that my suit shoulder and back is quite badly done. I have the shoulder divot too. I would like to know if it's fixable and how?





post #4198 of 5378
Quote:
Originally Posted by ganner123 View Post

Hi,

I'm new to suit tailoring.

I notice that my suit shoulder and back is quite badly done. I have the shoulder divot too. I would like to know if it's fixable and how?
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)





Do you like this shoulder style?

Don't be in a hurry to let out the center back. You would benefit more from letting out the side body at the top of the armhole/ blade. Will release the back and clean up the blades. You need a bit more length over the neck point on the right shoulder. Could be noted for further jackets.

The sleeves need to be re cut to fit the armhole. Not sure if they have enough fullness or width to work. Was this made for you or RTW?
post #4199 of 5378
Quote:
Originally Posted by lierre View Post
 

Sorry I only got back pictures of this new tux (smallest size from ehaberdasher). Does it look too big, or is it salvageable? The shoulders feel pretty close to me, maybe an extra centimeter overhang on each side. Thanks for any feedback!

 

*

 

I've added a few pics below. Any opinions? Thanks!

 

 

 

post #4200 of 5378
Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post


Do you like this shoulder style?

Don't be in a hurry to let out the center back. You would benefit more from letting out the side body at the top of the armhole/ blade. Will release the back and clean up the blades. You need a bit more length over the neck point on the right shoulder. Could be noted for further jackets.

The sleeves need to be re cut to fit the armhole. Not sure if they have enough fullness or width to work. Was this made for you or RTW?

 

Despos,

 

I prefer a natural shoulder. I got this made. Somehow it didn't turn out that way thus the forum advice. Would it still be possible to go for a natural? Or too much or a risk?

 

I'm concern on 2 things. The others I think I can live with

 

1. Top back and blades. Will take note on letting out the side body at the top of armhole/blade.

 

2. Shoulder dimple. How do I fix this? Assuming there is sufficient fabric tucked in. More sleeve cap? 

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