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The Tailors' Thread: Fit Feedback and Alteration Suggestions - Page 170

post #2536 of 5378
Quote:
Originally Posted by azumi View Post

Thank you very much.

So in case the tailors in my living place cannot convert the actual sleeve's cuffs to surgeon's cuffs, should I just attach the buttons on the cuffs as the non-working buttons? and do I have to re-sew the sleeve vents after ripping the old stitching (the white welt inside the cuffs)? Could you do me a favor by upload a few pics as an example for me to refer?

And what do you think about the back length? Do I have to shorten this?

Regards.

I'll take some pics of this later today as I have some sleeves to shorten, but the answer on resewing the sleeve is yes. Shortening a jacket sleeve involves completely taking the whole bottom of the sleeve apart. Every single stitch gets ripped out of there and the vent is remade. It's one of the most common jobs and in the mind of the customer it's nothing, but it's a bit of work, indeed. Way more work than hemming pants, for instance. There's just no getting around it if you want it done right, anyway. If you've got a little vent left after shortening the sleeve, you've got a few options:

Sew on 4 traditional buttons and make maybe the bottom two working. Obviously you'd need buttonholes sewn on for this. Or, you could put 3 working buttons on only or perhaps even 2. After all, it is an odd jacket, right? Why not induce a little style into it? Not many are running around with 2 working button odd jackets...

Regarding the back length, you shouldn't have material bunching up over top of your seat creating a "shelf". That's a sign that the seat of the jacket is a little too tight. It's not REALLY tight and may not need to be adjust much, but perhaps a little. The back balance does look a little long. This is fixed by shortening the back at the top. 

These 3 alterations:

-Shortening sleeves no matter how you do the buttons, but def more if you want them working

-letting out the side seams at the front only

-squaring shoulders/shortening back balance

 

are going to cost you a little bit.

post #2537 of 5378
Quote:
Originally Posted by fallforall View Post

 

Posted this a bit ago and it got lost in the shuffle.

 

This is a 36R.

I have the option to exchange for a 36S, which would take 0.9" off the sleeves and about 1.2" off the jacket length.

 

Suggestions to keep/exchange?

It doesn't look to long to me...

It looks kindof classic. How far below your seat is the back?

Also, is the jacket tight in the waist? It looks like it 'could be' with the bottom button gaping open, but that can also occur from the front balance being too long.

If the front balance is too long, the jacket itself may seem long in general to you. You want to look at where the back of the jacket falls in relation to your seat. It should be roughly 1" below the bottom of your seat. You can get away with a tiny bit more if you're tall. You'll know the front balance is too long if you open the jacket and the fronts gape apart in the shape of an inverted "V" instead of hanging straight from your shoulders. The back of the jacket will also kick out slightly.

Lastly, there's an issue with the back of the pants. The material shouldn't be collapsing like that. Could be a few things that need to be adjusted back there, but that tends to occur with too high a rise, too loose a waist, too baggy a seat, or too loose in stride...and/or a little long in length

post #2538 of 5378
Quote:
Originally Posted by RDiaz View Post

 

It might be because it's cotton. If buttons and fake buttonholes were to be removed to shorten the sleeve, they would leave marks.

possibly...but it's pile cord and that nap can be raised. My guess is that it's a Polo sales/marketing stunt. Makes it easier on your tailor...except it doesn't censored.gif

post #2539 of 5378

I see smile.gif

 

By the way, today I'm shortening sleeves on a jacket with non-functional buttons myself for the first time. The first one turned out great, I think. It has four buttons and I'm removing the last one, I believe 3 buttons looks better since the vent is being shortened quite a bit. Fake buttonholes were ripped out just fine with patience. I'm leaving 1.2 inches between the last button and the hem, is that OK considering I'm a short guy? Otherwise I'll have to ask my tailor to remove the last button and place it on top, as I'm still not qualified to do the fake buttonholes by hand myself...

post #2540 of 5378
Quote:
Originally Posted by OTCtailor View Post

I'll take some pics of this later today as I have some sleeves to shorten, but the answer on resewing the sleeve is yes. Shortening a jacket sleeve involves completely taking the whole bottom of the sleeve apart. Every single stitch gets ripped out of there and the vent is remade. It's one of the most common jobs and in the mind of the customer it's nothing, but it's a bit of work, indeed. Way more work than hemming pants, for instance. There's just no getting around it if you want it done right, anyway. If you've got a little vent left after shortening the sleeve, you've got a few options:

Sew on 4 traditional buttons and make maybe the bottom two working. Obviously you'd need buttonholes sewn on for this. Or, you could put 3 working buttons on only or perhaps even 2. After all, it is an odd jacket, right? Why not induce a little style into it? Not many are running around with 2 working button odd jackets...

Regarding the back length, you shouldn't have material bunching up over top of your seat creating a "shelf". That's a sign that the seat of the jacket is a little too tight. It's not REALLY tight and may not need to be adjust much, but perhaps a little. The back balance does look a little long. This is fixed by shortening the back at the top. 

These 3 alterations:

-Shortening sleeves no matter how you do the buttons, but def more if you want them working

-letting out the side seams at the front only

-squaring shoulders/shortening back balance

 

are going to cost you a little bit.

I think your advice is very helpful. I think I should have the non-working buttons sewn on the because I dont want to get a risk if I asked a tailor about making the buttonholes. The reason is I think they don't have the professional buttonholing machine (as you said at the page above). So the non-working buttons without the counterfeit buttonholes should be the safest solution in my case.

I still am expecting your photos. When you have free time, please upload them.

Thank you again :)

P/S: regarding the back length, what do you mean by shortening it at the top? ( So far, I just think the tailor will shorten the back by cut horizontally at the bottom of the jacket)

post #2541 of 5378
Quote:
Originally Posted by fallforall View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)








Posted this a bit ago and it got lost in the shuffle.

This is a 36R.
I have the option to exchange for a 36S, which would take 0.9" off the sleeves and about 1.2" off the jacket length.

Suggestions to keep/exchange?

Don't get the 36S. Jacket length looks right on, and the sleeves are almost right as-is. An inch shorter would be too short.
post #2542 of 5378
Quote:
Originally Posted by unclesam099 View Post

Another photo of my waistcoat - please give suggestions on what I might change on a future order.


The top of the vest looks off as much as the bottom. The shoulder is too narrow. Would make the shoulder width a good inch or more wider. Would look less like a men's tank top.
On the next one place the bottom button of the vest on the waist band seam and extend the points from that point.

By definition a waistcoat is cut longer like this, vests are shorter.
post #2543 of 5378
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post


I think the word we're looking for here is "conservative" which actually ties nicely into the formality scale Will outlines. The SB is more conservative, thus more appropriate for a lower-status employee who needs to draw attention to himself, not his clothes. The senior employee/owner has the leeway to wear a less-conservative/less-formal suit because F*** you, I'm the boss.

Well said, this is exactly what I was trying to say.
post #2544 of 5378
Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post

By definition a waistcoat is cut longer like this, vests are shorter.

 

That's interesting, Despos - I've never seen that distinction suggested before. I've always simply heard the same thing referred to as a 'vest' by Americans and a 'waistcoat' by the British. To a British person, a 'vest' is an undershirt, and the only North American use of 'waistcoat' I've ever heard of is the early-20th century 'weskit'. Is this something you'd suggest is 'common' usage or just some kind of tailor-slang? :)

post #2545 of 5378
The distinction was related to me from a new client who had been going to Huntsman. They had made both waistcoats and vests for him and the length of the fronts and points was the biggest difference.

Don't know about the other jargon you mentioned
post #2546 of 5378
Quote:
Originally Posted by Betelgeuse View Post

^^That has to be the best example of shoulder divots. I never imagine that they were caused by that. Thanks jefferyd!

Few years ago I had a problem with the shoulder "breaking" on a client. A couple small bumps on the shoulder line. Remade the shoulder twice adjusting the usual things but it didn't improve. At that point you step back and look at the whole jacket. The client had a larger left shoulder blade than the right and the jacket seemed tight over the blade. Let out the underarm at the blade on the left side and the shoulder bumps went away. Cause and effect vary and the different elements of a garment relate and effect each other.
post #2547 of 5378
Quote:
Originally Posted by katabatic View Post

This is the MTM tuxedo that I just got. While I'm happy with parts of it, the sleeves have some pretty noticeable issues. From what I've read in this thread, it may be a matter of sleeve pitch? I also have somewhat forward pitched shoulders, which I think they failed to take into account. Ironically, the sleeves on my OTR Suitsupply Sienna don't show any of these issues. 

(Parenthetically, I want to add that I'm in awe of everyone who gets great pictures, in this thread and others! It's surprisingly difficult to get good pictures of yourself in a suit on your own, especially in a cramped and poorly lit flat). 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)











They didn't do well adjusting for your low right shoulder and that is causing the wrinkles on the right side of the body. Moving the button will help some. Wish the buttoning point was lower and those are the thinnest shawls I have ever seen.
post #2548 of 5378
Quote:
Originally Posted by unclesam099 View Post

Another photo of my waistcoat - please give suggestions on what I might change on a future order.


Did you specifically request for the placement of the buttons as such? Looks off.

And Despos is right on the shoulders.

*Are you Sam, who plays polo at the Royal Berkshire Polo Club?
post #2549 of 5378
Quote:
Originally Posted by OTCtailor View Post

Ultimately, you'd have to look up the history of the suit, but a double breasted lounge suit is a step-up in formality from the single breasted version. The peak lapel is a step up in formality from the notch lapel. It's a sartorial mismatch to have a notch lapel with a double breast. You do see it occasionally, but it's more of a fashion move than anything else. The shawl collar is is found on DB dinner jackets, mostly.
Lastly, DB suits are designed to present a specific visual aesthetic, which is the broadening and lengthening of the torso. The different button stances allow for different builds of torso. The peak lapel is a natural fit for that purpose.

Thanks for that, really appreciated.

Do you think it is fair to say that the more "boxy" (in terms of width to height ratio, not waist shape) shape of a DB requires the reinforcement of the vertical element of peaks?
post #2550 of 5378
Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post

. Wish the buttoning point was lower and those are the thinnest shawls I have ever seen.

Yes, the shawl is actually significantly narrower than I asked for (it's only 5cm at its widest), and looks completely out of balance with my shoulders. Like something from Zara or H&M to my eyes.
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