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Allowances for alterations to tailored clothing - Page 2

post #16 of 28
Very good thread, thanks Jeffrey. This should be a stickie.
post #17 of 28

Looks good.

post #18 of 28
Very cool, great job!
post #19 of 28
Very interesting, JefferyD. If a potential client comes in and says he is prone to significant weight fluctuations, what would you tell him? Can you build in extra allowances for such customers? Is there a way to describe, overall, the maximum amount the typical bespoke suit can be let out?

I've always wondered how stable one's build should be before considering bespoke. I'll probably be a lot fatter in 25 years, if not next year.
post #20 of 28
Thread Starter 
Thanks, all.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocHolliday View Post

Very interesting, JefferyD. If a potential client comes in and says he is prone to significant weight fluctuations, what would you tell him?

I would tell him to see a nutritionist.
Quote:
Can you build in extra allowances for such customers? Is there a way to describe, overall, the maximum amount the typical bespoke suit can be let out?
Not really. It depends on how much was allowed when cutting, and then how much of that allowance was consumed during fittings. The first suit is iffy, but subsequent ones will be better but it also varies from cutter to cutter. Some take pride in not needing vast inlays in order to get the fit right.
Quote:
I've always wondered how stable one's build should be before considering bespoke. I'll probably be a lot fatter in 25 years, if not next year.

Things can be let out by a couple of inches, but when you get beyond that it gets dicey. Proportions and positions of things get thrown off. Pants are fairly straightforward, but the prevailing wisdom (which may or may not be correct) is that the girth increases by two thirds in the front and one third in the back as we get fat. IOW your stomach gets bigger at a much faster rate than the tire, but there is no allowance for letting the stomach out at the front of the coat, where it is really needed. And as the paunch develops, there is a cut hidden by the pocket which needs to be opened up to keep the fronts from kicking and you need some extra length in the front to cover it. So its no longer a matter of just circumference but of balance when you start to develop a gut.
post #21 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geezer View Post

Very good thread, thanks Jeffrey. This should be a stickie.

It is a great article. We will actually be putting this and other articles like it in our articles section, so that the content stays "everygreen" and can be easily used as a reference. This system will be useful for both established and new members, and new members with questions can easily be referred to it, and not be daunted by a 1000 page thread.
post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post

So its no longer a matter of just circumference but of balance when you start to develop a gut.

One of the lesser known detrimental by-products of overindulging.
post #23 of 28
Very very nice write-up !
post #24 of 28

There might be even only one inch in the side seam per half body side available as inlay to let out. If you need more than that it effect the stomach dart like JD says and you need a new draft. The stomach dart in the pocket keeps the fronts shaped around your belly and is an important tool to make your jacket fit. When the stomach grows you also need more front length over the belly.

 

The best is when you vary between slim and getting fat you have two suits, LOL. One for slim times and one for fat times.

It is also true that the most perfect cutters only cut almost none inlay, as the inlay might disturb the fall of fabric or shine through when using light material.

 

The side seam is a sensitive seam where big inlays disturb. So you better have your weight locked in when ordering an expensive suit.  

post #25 of 28


Thank you for sharing all this. Very detailed and useful information!

post #26 of 28

These threads are fantastic reading!! I do have to pick a small issue though, having worked in a tailoring business specializing in alterations I have rarely seen a trouser with 2.5" to let out, only ever on bespoke or made to measure garments. Most OTR trousers seem to have slightly less than a full size roughly 3.5cm total (1.5" roughly). Which always leaves a problem if the client has the jacket that fits and needs to let the trousers out a full size as is not possible.
 

post #27 of 28

Great information!

 

Is there any information you can provide on the average cost of performing each alteration?  I am currently using a very skilled tailor from Spain who refuses to deliver a quote for his services.  I just have to wait until the services are performed to know what the damage is.  It's a slight inconvenience and a pain to try to budget these types of items.

post #28 of 28
Wow, amazing piece of knowledge. Thanks.
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