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Opening a bottle of Champagne. Instructional. - Page 2

post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by whodini
You clearly have never visited a strip club's back room before...

I'm not sure whether to be ashamed or proud about that.
post #17 of 29
A simple bit of satire and sarcasm on my part, meant as humor.

Relax, have some good bubbles and move on.

Cheers.



Quote:
Originally Posted by dkzzzz
..
post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stu
I'm not sure whether to be ashamed or proud about that.
Ashamed=never met Sparkle, proud=met Candy.
post #19 of 29
Screw that. Remove the wire thing, shake the sum-a-bitch up and watch the cap fly. Bonus points if you hit the restaurant owner with it.
post #20 of 29
I don't know why, but I picked up the habbit of using a tea towel or a heavy napkin in the hand that holds the cork. aside from that, pretty much the same as mentioned. nobody else?
post #21 of 29
A tea towel gives better grip. Also, rotating the bottle while holding the cork stationary gives finer control over the speed of the operation.
post #22 of 29
I gotta disagree with this. Much less shaking when you hold the bottle stationary and ease the cork out with your thumb and index finger.

I open about a dozen Champagne and other sparkling wines a day this way. Trust me, it works.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Concordia
Rotating the bottle while holding the cork stationary gives finer control over the speed of the operation.
post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by cuffthis
I gotta disagree with this. Much less shaking when you hold the bottle stationary and ease the cork out with your thumb and index finger.

I open about a dozen Champagne and other sparkling wines a day this way. Trust me, it works.

Practice makes perfect.

In my imperfect world, a cork that is really jammed in is one I am not anxious to dislodge with two fingers. So when I get a nasty one, I hold on tight and twist the bottle. Prevents the worst catastrophes.
post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by cuffthis
I gotta disagree with this. Much less shaking when you hold the bottle stationary and ease the cork out with your thumb and index finger.

I open about a dozen Champagne and other sparkling wines a day this way. Trust me, it works.

By "easing the cork out," do you mean twist back and forth? If so, there would be less shaking with one smooth twist of the bottle.
post #25 of 29
I have found that if you loosen the safety wire and then use your thumb and forefinger to lightly push up on the cork, it will gradually and slowly (and safely) come out, with little or no noise (and no spillage). The key is to hold the bottle still while you do this.

Everyone wants to hold the cork still and turn the bottle. This CAN work but it often results in a loud pop, spillage, or in a worst case scenario, an airborne cork. Holding the bottle still takes a couple tries but it really results in a much more elegant and safe opening, IMHO.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffC
By "easing the cork out," do you mean twist back and forth? If so, there would be less shaking with one smooth twist of the bottle.
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by cuffthis
I have found that if you loosen the safety wire and then use your thumb and forefinger to lightly push up on the cork, it will gradually and slowly (and safely) come out, with little or no noise (and no spillage). The key is to hold the bottle still while you do this.

Everyone wants to hold the cork still and turn the bottle. This CAN work but it often results in a loud pop, spillage, or in a worst case scenario, an airborne cork. Holding the bottle still takes a couple tries but it really results in a much more elegant and safe opening, IMHO.

It's good to be careful.
I once represented the Portuguese concern that makes much of the world's cork for, you guessed it, putting someone's eye out.
"Funny" in the abstract, quite gross in reality.
post #27 of 29
Have they made synthetic corks for sparkling wines yet?
post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Checks
It's good to be careful.
I once represented the Portuguese concern that makes much of the world's cork for, you guessed it, putting someone's eye out.
"Funny" in the abstract, quite gross in reality.

GT's suggestion of placing a (nice) dishtowel over the top immediately after the safety cage is removed is a good one. No blinded eyes/shattered light fixtures/etc.
post #29 of 29
About 4 mins ago I used a meat cleaver and it was flawless.

Happy new year.
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