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improving voice - Page 4

post #46 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jared
A compromise solution: get a Canadian accent. (I have read in our jingoistic local press that ESL students prefer to study Canada because our accent is the most easily understood by English speakers with other accents - I think that's a nice way of saying: even the Canadian accent is boring! )
From my experience, this is true. I'm studying in Finland on an international exchange where there are roughly 30 nations being represented this semester. Needless to say, there is a wide variety of english accents, and me, being Canadian, have recieved numerous comments on how easy it is to understand my english. That being said, I try to speak a little slower when talking to people who don't have english as a mother tounge. This, more than my accent, may be the reason why I'm easily understood.
post #47 of 63
Rock Hudson once shared his secret for his deep, sonorous voice on some biography I saw on television.

He said a fellow actor told him to go out to the hills in California when he had a sore throat, and to shout till he was raw.

Apparently, this damages the vocal chords, and when they heal, the voice is lowered a bit. Hudson says he did this, but it seems pretty obvious that he had an unusually low voice to begin with.

As for the accent, you could try a coach, or just try and copy it on your own. If you're surrounded by Brits, you should be able to slide into their accent to a degree. I happen to have an ear for languages, and speak a few to various degrees, so picking up accents has always been easy for me. If it doesn't come easy for you, try going for that "Frasier Crane" sound. American, but very proper.

If you find yourself saying 'bruvah' and 'muvah,' then you're copying the wrong people. Watch the movie "Sexy Beast" for how not to speak.
post #48 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeSica
Rock Hudson once shared his secret for his deep, sonorous voice on some biography I saw on television.

He said a fellow actor told him to go out to the hills in California when he had a sore throat, and to shout till he was raw.

Apparently, this damages the vocal chords, and when they heal, the voice is lowered a bit. Hudson says he did this, but it seems pretty obvious that he had an unusually low voice to begin with.

As for the accent, you could try a coach, or just try and copy it on your own. If you're surrounded by Brits, you should be able to slide into their accent to a degree. I happen to have an ear for languages, and speak a few to various degrees, so picking up accents has always been easy for me. If it doesn't come easy for you, try going for that "Frasier Crane" sound. American, but very proper.

If you find yourself saying 'bruvah' and 'muvah,' then you're copying the wrong people. Watch the movie "Sexy Beast" for how not to speak.

To get the way Frasier Crane speaks, or perhaps the perfect archetype, Orson Wells, you're talking about a study of diction for quite some time in the theater... again, you'll probably sound like a poser.
post #49 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stazy
From my experience, this is true. I'm studying in Finland on an international exchange where there are roughly 30 nations being represented this semester. Needless to say, there is a wide variety of english accents, and me, being Canadian, have recieved numerous comments on how easy it is to understand my english. That being said, I try to speak a little slower when talking to people who don't have english as a mother tounge. This, more than my accent, may be the reason why I'm easily understood.
Don't they always ask you why you are talking about "a boot"?
post #50 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by j
Don't they always ask you why you are talking about "a boot"?

You're probably joking but that is probably the most rediculous stereotype in the world.

Also, people rip on us for saying "eh", but comming from South Africa, I can tell you that when we speak English there, we say that a lot too, as well as "man", in the colloquial vein. Even Henry Higgins constantly says "eh".
post #51 of 63
eh man, aboot that, not everyone talks all goofy like, eh.
post #52 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Violinist
You're probably joking but that is probably the most rediculous stereotype in the world.

Also, people rip on us for saying "eh", but comming from South Africa, I can tell you that when we speak English there, we say that a lot too, as well as "man", in the colloquial vein. Even Henry Higgins constantly says "eh".
Uh, right, it's pretty ridiculous, except that it's true, having gone to Canada and getting Canadian TV channels. Obviously not everyone has the same issue, but it does happen. Commercials are especially egregious - I can't believe they let their announcer say "Maaaz-da".
post #53 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Violinist
The British middle upper class practically bankrupt themselves to send their kids to Eton and comparable schools to get a very posh accent. It would be very difficult for you to fool people, and I think unless you live at an address that also suggests such an accent, people will definately call you a poseur.

I consider myself a well spoken Brit and I promise you that the accent people who go to public schools like Eton seem to learn is no way how 'proper' English should be spoken. They seem to have a drawl, as if even forming a word is too much effort or bother for the speaker, and frankly that accent is a bit of a joke here! Notice you'll never get a BBC news reader with that public school 'posh' accent. My personal favourite is the Manchester accent, like Morrissey's! It's much more interesting than my boring southern voice.
post #54 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by j
Uh, right, it's pretty ridiculous, except that it's true, having gone to Canada and getting Canadian TV channels. Obviously not everyone has the same issue, but it does happen. Commercials are especially egregious - I can't believe they let their announcer say "Maaaz-da".
Where did you travel in Canada? Certain "Canadian" words/phrases are more popular in some regions than others. Newfoundland has, by far, the worst English in all of Canada.
post #55 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by tommib
I consider myself a well spoken Brit and I promise you that the accent people who go to public schools like Eton seem to learn is no way how 'proper' English should be spoken. They seem to have a drawl, as if even forming a word is too much effort or bother for the speaker, and frankly that accent is a bit of a joke here! Notice you'll never get a BBC news reader with that public school 'posh' accent. My personal favourite is the Manchester accent, like Morrissey's! It's much more interesting than my boring southern voice.

I think Manc's have the coolest accent too.

If you read that post about the development of the Queen's accent, you'll see that her once incredibly elite accent was in fact incredibly lazy.
post #56 of 63
Not unlike the supposedly elite American accents, like the Connecticut lockjaw. William F. Buckley?
post #57 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quirk
the Connecticut lockjaw

I've lived in Connecticut for most of my life (I'm 37) and, Katherine Hepburn aside, I have yet to hear anyone, rich or poor, with this accent.

In reality, people in Connecticut are known for having no accent. If pressed, the only thing I can really point to is that we tend to speak with very flat "A's". For example, "France" ends up sounding like "Fraaaance".
post #58 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stazy
Newfoundland has, by far, the worst English in all of Canada.

Do I hear a joke coming?
post #59 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBZ
I've lived in Connecticut for most of my life (I'm 37) and, Katherine Hepburn aside, I have yet to hear anyone, rich or poor, with this accent. In reality, people in Connecticut are known for having no accent. If pressed, the only thing I can really point to is that we tend to speak with very flat "A's". For example, "France" ends up sounding like "Fraaaance".
Whether or not Connecticut rightly deserves the eponymous honor, I can't say. But that's beside the point.
post #60 of 63
I think the hardest part will be thinking up ridiculous and confusing phrases brits use. Many times when I read british news stories, I don't have a clue what they're talking about. ie: "tarred her with the same brush as yobs." http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/news/article-23382654-details/Shop+bans+Jay,+the+two-year-old+'hoodie'/article.do You know they do that just to mess with people. They make it up on-spot.
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