or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › improving voice
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

improving voice - Page 2

post #16 of 63
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by denimdestroyedmylife
i disagree with you on this point. i dated an american girl w/ a fake british accent that she adopted after a semester in england------she kept it up for a good year but reverted to her native "joisey" tongue out of sheer exhaustion.


oh, and exhibit b: madonna

fake can be just as good, but still... fake.

oh you didn't date madonna?
post #17 of 63
Seems like in the states, a British accent gives you instant credibility so long as you don't speak for too long at one time. In England, I'm sure having a US accent will have the opposite effect.
post #18 of 63
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiecollector
Seems like in the states, a British accent gives you instant credibility so long as you don't speak for too long at one time. In England, I'm sure having a US accent will have the opposite effect.

Not just the States.... a British accent gives you instant credibility everywhere.
post #19 of 63
Good god. This is just getting stranger by the moment. Seriously, sloaney, if you want to improve yourself, so be it. But adopting a different accent for credibility is not the most constructive thing I can think of. Improve your language skills first. Even if you end up wit a posh upper class accent, if you, like cannot string together a coherent sentence it will be like, you know, like awful But seriously, concentrate first on improving your language skills, vocabulary et.c. and leave the accent for now. You'll find that a lot more important. Edit: Trust me, it does NOT give you instant credibility everywhere. I wish I could when necessary do a greek accent when speaking english. Oftentimes it is better to fit in more than stand out without meaning to.
post #20 of 63
Personally, I'd shoot for Malan's accent from Project Runway 3. It is the result of living a few years in every English speaking country/region you can think of haha.
post #21 of 63
A compromise solution: get a Canadian accent. (I have read in our jingoistic local press that ESL students prefer to study Canada because our accent is the most easily understood by English speakers with other accents - I think that's a nice way of saying: even the Canadian accent is boring! )
post #22 of 63
I won't pass judgement on your views of what you term a British accent.

I would think that in the UK, you would be able to find language schools that also offer ESL classes. Any good ESL teacher uses specific pronunciation exercises. An accent/dialect coach would probably be more expensive, but I don't know so much about the UK market. Universities also typically offer ESL classes, and language lab time, which in my opinion, if monitored by a competent professor, can be very valuable.

You might find this story interesting:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/london/insideld...t_london.shtml
post #23 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by smw356
I fail to see how adopting a false accent to hide where you are from is improving yourself in any way shape or form. To me its a pretty telltale sign of shame of some sort of form that you're compensating for.

By all means improve yourself by any means you can. Improve your body. Improve your mind. Improve your social standing. However do not cross the line into trying to be someone you aren't. Embrace your heritage while improving yourself. Even if you dislike your heritage it has made you what you are. Do not be ashamed of it and try to hide it. If you're are American. Be a god damn American. Don't start down some pattern of self-hate and forcing yourself to become someone that you are not.

I have an American accent for English and another completely different accent when I speak my own language. It's possible for me to speak with a "bastardized" American accent but it's easier to blend in the other way. You remind me of people in my highschool who label those who could speak proper foreign accents as posers...
post #24 of 63
Sloaney,

If you really want the accent, I have a great way of you getting it. Here is how:

1) Get an account at bitme.org, a bit torrent website.
2) Search for "accents"
3) There is a program to download there that teaches you all kinds of accents. If I recall correctly it had two types of British, Australian, Irish, Scottish, etc. It basically teaches you how to speak with different parts of your throat/mouth and use different types of mouth and tongue movements to emulate different accents. Very educational, and free.

If you do not know how to use bit torrent or what it is, or if you cannot get an invitation to the site, then you don't want the accent badly enough.

Hope that helps.
post #25 of 63
when I lived in the US, I used to have to use a fake Californian accent when ordering food. Otherwise no one could decipher my Australian. Incidentally the first word that I mastered when attempting to learn how to Talk American was 'fucker'. Once youve got that down, youve pretty much got the essentials.
post #26 of 63
sloaney

I have "nuetralized" my accent over the years - I get comments all the time on how clear my english is, and how it lacks any type of regional accent. I work mostly with people who speak english as a second ( or third) language, and I have put effort into making sure that regional accents or vocabulary wont confuse them.


my wife, columbian born and educated at a british private acadamy, took a number of lessons from a speech therapist a few years ago, when she was teaching in university, to get rid of her accent. even though she has been living in the US for only 3 years, nobody ever guesses that she isn't american born, she has no accent.


I would suggest that you find a speech therapist in london.
post #27 of 63
Thread Starter 
thanks for all the advice, really appreciate it
globetrotter, i find it really interesting that your wife wanted to get rid of her english accent when she moved to america .... i thought americans loved the english accent

i found that international british schools overseas often teach the best accent. a friend of mine went to an international british school in hong kong, and then went to america for college but she still maintains her british accent to this day .... in fact her english accent is better than that of english people, so it was quite amazing listening to her converse in london with the natives.....
post #28 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by sloaney
thanks for all the advice, really appreciate it
globetrotter, i find it really interesting that your wife wanted to get rid of her english accent when she moved to america .... i thought americans loved the english accent

i found that international british schools overseas often teach the best accent. a friend of mine went to an international british school in hong kong, and then went to america for college but she still maintains her british accent to this day .... in fact her english accent is better than that of english people, so it was quite amazing listening to her converse in london with the natives.....


actually, to clarify - my wife had a spanish/british accent and wanted to clar it up. more importantly, columbians speak very quickly, and she was tought to slow down her speech.
post #29 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by sloaney

in my opinion, voice is probably the 2nd most important thing after physical appearence, and cannot be discounted. especially if you would like to sound credible and learned when giving your views and forecasts on the market to institutional investors.


ummm...i think both Condoleezza Rice and Tony Blair sound credible (no potshots here please) and learned. i'm pretty sure having an accent one way or the other has nothing to do with it.

-Jeff
post #30 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter


my wife, columbian born and educated at a british private acadamy, took a number of lessons from a speech therapist a few years ago, when she was teaching in university, to get rid of her accent. even though she has been living in the US for only 3 years, nobody ever guesses that she isn't american born, she has no accent.


I would suggest that you find a speech therapist in london.

I think there's always something that gives you away (Fabienne assumes sleuth demeanor). Maybe once or twice a year, someone will ask where I'm from (without seeing my first name). I have a fairly neutral American accent, but then I might pronounce some words with more of a British twist, and some of the 'r's cause me trouble, and I get lazy, at times, with my 'th's. The inconsistency is what gives me away, I believe, if we're only talking accents. There are many other cues by which a non-native may be identified. It's always a fun game to play, isn't it Globetrotter.

On Thursday morning, I'm doing a voice-over. I was chosen for the job because my accent, though American, has "something" about it (these are the words of the producer). This isn't my profession, I do it for fun, I get recommended by word of mouth.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › improving voice