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Houses with 'No Shoe' Rules - Page 6

post #76 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post

Y'all need to get over yourselves. Homes get soiled. Like it or not. Somebody coming into your house and putting a normal amount of wear on your furniture is not rude in the slightest. You being an ass about your carpet is.

Ugly american. In the sense that if the custom is different from where he grew up, the only possible path of righteousness is his own, and the other is clearly rude, ignorant, or both.
post #77 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Doxe View Post


My mother used to make my brother and I take our dirty clothes off outside after we'd been doing yardwork because she didn't want the house covered in grass clippings and dirt. We'd have to wash our hands with the garden hose if we were particularly filthy after pulling weeds. I used to find it demeaning. But I wasn't the one doing the vacuuming. Now, I'm thinking she was on to something and I'm going to do the same to my kids when they're old enough to do some manual labour.

I think it is more rude to come over and soil a person's home than it is to ask someone to take their shoes off. At least I don't tell them to strip to their underwear and hose them down with the garden hose. biggrin.gif At least not yet...

So the host is now more important than the guest? Good to know. Here I was thinking that hospitality demanded that the guest take precedence.

Without a host, there are no guests. Without guests there is no chaos. Respect is a two way street.
post #78 of 539
Filthy scums the lot of you!
Seems awfully arrogant of you to take offense from being asked to take your shoes off. You are saying you rather dirty my house with shit from the streets so your precious socks won't get dirty? You expect me to follow your rules in my own home?

I wouldn't invite anyone like that into my home a second time.
I will be as accommodating as I can to all guests, but within my house rules.
post #79 of 539
gentlemen, I'm not sure what the hell you all are walking through, but I have white and light tan carpets, and they need nothing more than regular vacuuming and some spot cleaning and I wear shoes on it every day.

Will it eventually get worn and need to be replaced? absolutely. Does that bother me? nope.

If you folks are scared of the germs from someone's shoes (what are you licking the floor btw), I hope you never step on a subway train, visit a carpeted office building, visit a public bathroom, or shake just about anyone's hand.
post #80 of 539
Actually host is ALWAYS more important than the guest. Just as a host has the right at any time to kick the guest out. The guest never have the right to boot he host from his own home.

It is the host's duty to make the guest welcome and ensure he enjoy the stay.

it is ALSO the guest's duty to respect the host and their house.

Why do people forget the latter?

Let say you are guest at a person's home. The host is Arachnophobic. It is pretty rude to say "Well I am the guest, and I should be able to wear my shirt with realistic pattern of tarantulas."
post #81 of 539
FWIW, in many places in Asia, where I live for sure, your home would really get nasty if you wore your shoes inside even for a day. There's a lot of environmental grime out there to bring in and we have wood, marble, or lino floors in most places, never carpet. Pretty quick way to scratch everything up and get black dirt everywhere. Just an effect of having millions upon millions of people sharing the same public spaces, car and industrial pollution.

In America, in certain places I guess, it is quite a bit cleaner and you can get away with wearing shoes inside, I know. I had white carpet in a place in college and it was in the middle of Missouri, so it was really quite clean outside, not much to track in between the car and the front door. White carpet stayed pretty white for the whole year i rented and I wore shoes inside, as did my guests.
Kinda uncomfortable though, in my opinion. I like not wearing my shoes inside.

Our dog gets picked up and put straight in the bathroom (wet bathroom that can get sprayed down) whenever she comes in from a walk.
post #82 of 539
Problem solved. Full suit optional.
500
post #83 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by blahman View Post

Filthy scums the lot of you!
Seems awfully arrogant of you to take offense from being asked to take your shoes off. You are saying you rather dirty my house with shit from the streets so your precious socks won't get dirty? You expect me to follow your rules in my own home?

I wouldn't invite anyone like that into my home a second time.
I will be as accommodating as I can to all guests, but within my house rules.

Not that I usually take offense (unless it is like some party where people are playing beer pong and you know that parts of the floor will be wet and nasty...then wtf would I take my shoes off for?)...but see bolded part above.

Your floors are already dirty, that is why peoples socks get dirty. I get that shoes are not the cleanest things in the world, but people seem to think that they are tracking in this huge range of shit that isn't already there--everything is dirty in this world...just how it is.

What if I have sat down on the curb or kneeled on the sidewalk in my raw denim that hasn't been washed in months? Do I have to take off my pants to come over too so that I can place my ass on your couch? If anything this is worse since I rarely mash my face into my floor but I quite frequently lie down on the sofa.

I'll still do it if asked...but if the best reason you can give is that "its dirty" I am just going to assume you are a bit of a germaphobe
post #84 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doxe View Post

Wearing shoes int he house is only slightly worse than people (especially the British) who have carpet in their bathroom...

Or in their kitchen, lol. Don't really get why people are getting so worked up over being asked to take their shoes off though, it's just a request. The fact that some people to things differently doesn't mean it's all bad and everybody should do and think the same thing as you.
post #85 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

I'll still do it if asked...but if the best reason you can give is that "its dirty" I am just going to assume you are a bit of a germaphobe
If you sat on the curb and happen to sit in dog poo/mud/motor oil/pool of water, pretty sure you will be changing out your pants VERY soon.

If you happen to step in the above, chances are you will probably scrape your feet on a clean patch of concrete or wipe it with some towels till you feel it is dry/clean, then continue on.

Hard to compare the two I would say.

But to be honest, if you showed up a someone's door with jeans/pants whose back side is blackened with mud/whatever, would you think it is odd if the host asked you to take off your pants and leave it outside?

Some people are perfectly ok with scraping their feet on the welcome mat and step into the house after such encounter. The same people probably are not willing to sit down on someone's carpet if their pants suffered the same treatment and they only wiped it a few times with a abrasive surface.
post #86 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesX View Post

If you sat on the curb and happen to sit in dog poo/mud/motor oil/pool of water, pretty sure you will be changing out your pants VERY soon.

If you happen to step in the above, chances are you will probably scrape your feet on a clean patch of concrete or wipe it with some towels till you feel it is dry/clean, then continue on.

Hard to compare the two I would say.

But to be honest, if you showed up a someone's door with jeans/pants whose back side is blackened with mud/whatever, would you think it is odd if the host asked you to take off your pants and leave it outside?

What world do you live in that people are constantly stepping in dogshit, mud, motor oil, and pools of water directly before stepping into your house. Most people wear rubber soled shoes...that water/mud/oil, etc is A) going to be rubbed off on the concrete by walking and B) going to be removed when I wipe my feet on your welcome mat (which I consider a common courtesy).
post #87 of 539
I spent $2000 on these Lobbs, god damn it! The only reason I am coming over to your house is so you can stare at them and drool with envy. Taking them off would completely defeat the purpose. Anyway, how dare you suggest they dirty? Lobbs are specially designed to float 1mm off the pavement and so, of course, never come into contact with anything so mundane as the ground. And I have photos of absolutely pristine leathers to prove it!
post #88 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeDT View Post


This....

...or if your guests refuse to remove their dirty outside shoes, don't invite them over.



FTFY
post #89 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadcammer View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesX View Post

If you sat on the curb and happen to sit in dog poo/mud/motor oil/pool of water, pretty sure you will be changing out your pants VERY soon.

If you happen to step in the above, chances are you will probably scrape your feet on a clean patch of concrete or wipe it with some towels till you feel it is dry/clean, then continue on.

Hard to compare the two I would say.

But to be honest, if you showed up a someone's door with jeans/pants whose back side is blackened with mud/whatever, would you think it is odd if the host asked you to take off your pants and leave it outside?

What world do you live in that people are constantly stepping in dogshit, mud, motor oil, and pools of water directly before stepping into your house. Most people wear rubber soled shoes...that water/mud/oil, etc is A) going to be rubbed off on the concrete by walking and B) going to be removed when I wipe my feet on your welcome mat (which I consider a common courtesy).

I live in a city, and dodging dogshit is a constant game. I'm not claiming that I eliminate all dirt by taking off my shoes, but it sure can't hurt. And no, I'm not a germophobe.

Also,

A) All of it will be rubbed off? Really?

B) All of it will be removed? Really?
post #90 of 539
while we are on the topic of weird house related behavior, here's a question:

What the hell is the deal with bathrobes? Who wears these things? And why? I can't think of any reason for this item. You get out of the shower, you dry off, you put clothes on...done.
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