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Houses with 'No Shoe' Rules - Page 32

post #466 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by RSS View Post

In 'unguarded' moments? Un huh. JT ... any unguarded moment is an intentional 'leak.'
In my house it is the norm to wear shoes. I have no issue with others who desire to have a 'no-shoes' rule for themselves and friends who pay casual visits. That said, for events -- particularly large ones and those of a business nature -- that are more than casual gathererings, I do feel it is probably best to allow guests to wear shoes (although if slippers were to be provided ... I wouldn't complain).

And look at that language, its magnificent subtly and its sure.. uhh... footedly walking near but not across any line I'd have a problem with.

Let's see:
Quote:
In my house it is the norm to wear shoes.
Very carefully marking the domain of application- not Universal, not American, not Normal, but in my house it is the norm.
Quote:
I have no issue with others who desire to have a 'no-shoes' rule for themselves and friends who pay casual visits.
Drat. Can't call you on anything here.
Quote:
That said, for events -- particularly large ones and those of a business nature -- that are more than casual gathererings,
Ok, I can feel it... here it comes, the great prescription!
Quote:
I do feel it is probably best to allow guests to wear shoes
"I feel", "probably best"... where is the sturm and drang? This sounds so... polite.

but wait, maybe in the next clause:
Quote:
(although if slippers were to be provided ... I wouldn't complain).
Oh! no sturm and drang, just a polite note that if you are still requested to remove you shoes, if the host was a gentleman about it, you wouldn't complain.

Nothing. Not one iota, can I complain about. How are we supposed to get to 500 posts if you insist on being a gentleman about things?

Maybe if I did archeology on the note where you mentioned the Queen; maybe there you suggested that that my provide a norm for... normal people. More productive might be to analyze the "what houses to you go to" line... except that I might not want to go there because I'd want to go there. So to speak.
post #467 of 539
A large gathering taking a leak? Like a trough urinal?
post #468 of 539
I can't believe this thread still lingers. deadhorse-a.gif

I usually wear my shoes inside the house and accordingly do not expect guests to take off theirs. By the same token, if someone expects me to take off my shoes I would respect that request without hesitation. It seems that people and cultures have varying expectations re shoes in the house. The bottom line is it's their house, so their rules. As simple as that, IMO.

As to urinals, personally I find it odd that someone would ask a male guest to sit while using the toilet, and I would not do so unless asked. If I was asked, the correct response, again, should be obvious (see above). As to a wife asking her husband to sit while using the toilet, that is a different can of worms ...
post #469 of 539
Storng Douchebags in this thread.

In my house, I don't wear shoes and expect guest to take theirs off. Actually, don't even need to ask them to...

I would just befriend you if you think you can live your life without considering others.icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
post #470 of 539
I never knew this was such a big deal.

Living in Canada, it's a social norm to take your shoes off inside. I wear my shoes when I come in the house until my girlfriend finally gives me shit.
post #471 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThatGuy View Post

Storng Douchebags in this thread.

In my house, I don't wear shoes and expect guest to take theirs off. Actually, don't even need to ask them to...

I would just befriend you if you think you can live your life without considering others.icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
Double facepalm.gif.
post #472 of 539
Shoes coming off in Anglo houses reeks of the same prole behavior entailed by covering the living room in plastic. In Japanese culture, I can understand it as cleanliness is better than godliness. I find it rather anal in European houses. What are they protecting? Some cheap pulled polyester masquerading as carpet from Ikea? My Grandfather's parquet is flawless after 130 years. As he is of mostly Irish descent, shoes are worn indoors. Our cousins in Ireland wouldn't dream of asking guests to remove shoes, barring the farmer of course who would prefer cow dung not be tracked into his living room.
post #473 of 539
What irks me is when there's no shoe horn to be found when you're putting your shoes back on again. Do these people think I'm some kind of animal?
post #474 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by E,TF View Post

What irks me is when there's no shoe horn to be found when you're putting your shoes back on again. Do these people think I'm some kind of animal?

Bring one with you. Two of my friends who I visit regularly who request I remove my shoes now have a shoe horn by their shoe rack because I asked that they provide it for me. That's a must. I often have a shoe horn in my bad/briefcase just in case. I would assume that everyone here brings a shoehorn with them to the airport. I bring plastic so it's easier to go through the metal detector.
post #475 of 539
If you don't want to take your shoes off, then don't and leave if you must--that is if your host insist. If asked, politely mention that you'd rather not, and offer to leave in order to avoid causing a problem; otherwise you'll just have to take your shoes off and sit their disgusted by the fact that you did. Make your own rules and live by them, but keep in mind that your rules will sometimes conflict with the rules of others---that's just how it is sometimes.
post #476 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt S View Post


Bring one with you. Two of my friends who I visit regularly who request I remove my shoes now have a shoe horn by their shoe rack because I asked that they provide it for me. That's a must. I often have a shoe horn in my bad/briefcase just in case. I would assume that everyone here brings a shoehorn with them to the airport. I bring plastic so it's easier to go through the metal detector.

Well being English I could never be so direct as to simply ask for such a thing to be provided, but when I visit the two people I know who have no-shoe rules, I bring one with me (if I remember) and hope one day they'll take the hint. It's when you're taken by surprise visiting somewhere new - as in the OP - that the problem arises. I just think if you're going to have such a rule in your house, you should supply a shoehorn for guests (as well as slippers). Actually I'd rather the shoehorn than the slippers.

I wear slipons or the like to airports, or shoes I don't much care about. Though the shoe thing happens less often in European airports these days. Not that I fly much if I can help it.
post #477 of 539
I found that my MN drivers license which was made of a pliable "crushable" material worked very well as an impromptu shoe horn.

Unfortunately my IL license is an uninteresting hard plastic rectangle that is too stiff to function well as a shoe horn.
post #478 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

I found that my MN drivers license which was made of a pliable "crushable" material worked very well as an impromptu shoe horn.

Unfortunately my IL license is an uninteresting hard plastic rectangle that is too stiff to function well as a shoe horn.

Aha! Look what I just kopped.
post #479 of 539
I am forced to do this on occasion, but I don't really mind because I wouldn't want people walking all over my carpets with their shoes either. If a person has marble or wood flooring in their house I think it's ridiculous to be asked to take off shoes though..
post #480 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by koolside View Post

If you don't want to take your shoes off, then don't and leave if you must--that is if your host insist. If asked, politely mention that you'd rather not, and offer to leave in order to avoid causing a problem; otherwise you'll just have to take your shoes off and sit their disgusted by the fact that you did. Make your own rules and live by them, but keep in mind that your rules will sometimes conflict with the rules of others---that's just how it is sometimes.

I refuse to live by anybody's rules but my own, and I refuse to make rules for anybody else to live by.
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