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Houses with 'No Shoe' Rules - Page 9

post #121 of 541
Quote:
Originally Posted by RSS View Post

Lately I've visited several homes where I've been asked to take off my shoes. In each case it seems that the house has a 'no shoe' rule. The thing is, I haven't been offered slippers to wear and I don't typically keep a pair with me (although I'm reconsidering keeping a pair in the trunk of the car).

To be honest, I don't like getting a good pair socks overly dirty. I don't care how clean a floor is ... it does soil the socks more than usual. If the socks are delicate, I find that going shoeless can wear them through very quickly.

I realize that in some cultures this may be the norm ... but both recent instances when this has occurred I have have been in households of Anglo-Saxon ethnicity.

Anyone care to share thoughts.

--

BTW ... it seems to me that the word 'with' in the title shouldn't be capitalized ... but the program makes the decision for me.

RSS next time you come to visit I'll be sure to find you a pair of house slippers. biggrin.gif

In all honesty, in wet or snowy conditions, we find that a no shoe policy keeps our floors cleaner (we have a mixture of hard wood floors in the public spaces and carpet in the bedrooms). In the warm months, our house is warm enough that I go barefoot at home. In winter, I put on house slippers or sock...
post #122 of 541
I put shoes on when I'm expecting guests.
post #123 of 541
Quote:
Originally Posted by Viral View Post

Customs and traditions aside, why the fuck would you want to keep wearing your shoes after a long day's work????? One of the best feelings is getting out of your shoes upon return home......just like having a cold beer on a really hot day.

I grew up in a no-shoes-in-the-house environment...............I'm SO glad I did.

And for those who keep splitting hairs about whether the house gets dirty from wearing shoes - the answer is YES.

I don't wear my dress shoes when I get home. I put on a pair of loosely laced sneakers or flip flops, which are both extremely comfortable.

Guess what, the house gets dirty regardless. You should be cleaning it frequently anyway.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicola View Post


500

I bet most of the people that find taking off their shoes strange are coming from warmer areas.

In a place with real winter you aren't worried about the germs. You're worried about the slush and road salt. If you're boots are warm you want to take them off to avoid sweating like a pig. If they're cold you want to take them off to warm up your feet. You take off your overcoat when entering a house? It's not different. Unless you're wearing overshoes you take off your shoes.

Obviously if I'm wearing snow boots, I will remove them on tiled surfaces. However, the question is whether shoes are worn in the home, not necessarily whether the boots you just walked through the slush are worn in your home.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeDT View Post


Some of the things I walk through...

Snow...
500

...flood...
500

...and sandstorm...
500
...most houses here don't have carpet. However the prevailing custom is to remove shoes and boots upon entering a house.

might want to move.
Quote:
Originally Posted by juniper View Post


No, what's weird is taking a pile of clothes into the bathroom, taking bedclothes (if any) off and showering, drying, putting on the clothes whilst in the bathroom, traipsing back to the bedroom with the pile of bedclothes in hand. What a palaver. I sleep naked anyway.

This is not complicated. Wake up, get out of bed, walk to bathroom in whatever you are currently wearing. Shower, dry off, walk to bedroom, dress, done.

I have this lovely thing called heat in my home, which allows me to walk from my bathroom to my bedroom either without clothing or in a towel.

Then again, its not that much of a burden to bring a pair of undergarments and a t-shirt with you into the bathroom.
post #124 of 541
But what if I need my shoes to charge my gadgets?

Also on a few points others have made...I am not from a warm climate, I have lived only in places with icky winters. In the winter if it has been a few days since it last snowed, the ground outside is usually clear and dry, but otherwise people always remove shoes or boots without question (or remove boots to put on shoes). Nobody in this thread is saying that they would walk around their own house in muddy boots.

Second, as someone else mentioned, this applies most to short visits and parties...you show up at someone's place before going to dinner and have to wait for them to get ready...who wants to untie and retie shoes for a 5 minute visit? If you are going to be lounging around on their couch for hours watching a movie, of course shoes come off for comfort.

As to the unwashed raw denim...maybe that is a bit extreme, but what about wool pants and suits? How often do you clean them? SF approved cleaning is very infrequent as long as you keep them brushed (just like brushing off your feet) and your pants spend many (sometimes sweaty) hours sitting on an office chair which has probably never been washed and has been sat on my all manner of pants--unwashed denim, suits that you sat on a nasty park bench in, khakis that enjoyed a nice brush with the bathroom floor when you were taking a dump.
post #125 of 541
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadcammer View Post

This is not complicated. Wake up, get out of bed, walk to bathroom in whatever you are currently wearing. Shower, dry off, walk to bedroom, dress, done.

I have this lovely thing called heat in my home, which allows me to walk from my bathroom to my bedroom either without clothing or in a towel.

Then again, its not that much of a burden to bring a pair of undergarments and a t-shirt with you into the bathroom.

Strangely, not all the people who live with me want to see me naked. Odd, that.
post #126 of 541
Thread Starter 
I never expected to get the number of responses that I find posted!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Master-Classter View Post

I don't even lie in my bed with clothes on, especially with things like jeans that haven't been washed in a while.
I can't imagine what some others might think if I let it be known that my beagles are welcome on my bed. So I just won't mention it. Of course, the bed is changed daily.
Quote:
Originally Posted by academe View Post

RSS next time you come to visit I'll be sure to find you a pair of house slippers. biggrin.gif
Why thank you. When I travel to be a guest in one's home -- or even when staying in a hotel -- I usually bring a pair of favorite Cleverley slippers ... in black leather and corduroy. And I typically have with me a pair or two of socks I don't mind wearing around the house -- or hotel room -- as a slipper substitute. Frankly, I'm comfortable enough with you two that I wouldn't mind wearing those. My comment was more about a brief visit for an evening meeting and/or dinner.
Quote:
Originally Posted by academe View Post

In all honesty, in wet or snowy conditions, we find that a no shoe policy keeps our floors cleaner (we have a mixture of hard wood floors in the public spaces and carpet in the bedrooms). In the warm months, our house is warm enough that I go barefoot at home. In winter, I put on house slippers or sock...
I do understand if there is snow and ice. Both recent occasions I experienced a 'no shoe rule' were in Orinda in the month of August ... where there is no snow and ice. And both were occasions where we were frequently going inside to outside and back ... which made my lace-up bluchers a pain. At one point I looked down and I was on the terrace in my socks! That was a bit purpose defeating.

Don't tell anyone, but during warm months ... I will often go barefoot around my own house ... in fact I'm that way right now. Although usually I wear slippers.
post #127 of 541
This issue is fascinating. Wasn't there a thread on it a couple years back that got out of hand?
post #128 of 541
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

This issue is fascinating. Wasn't there a thread on it a couple years back that got out of hand?

People have very strong feelings about this! laugh.gif
post #129 of 541
Thread Starter 
I found it very amusing when at one of these events my former business partner -- a very all-American person of Japanese ancestry -- came over to me and said, "What is it with Chip and Muffy and the 'no shoes rule? You'd think we were at my long decesased grandmother's house."
post #130 of 541
Based on the responses in this thread, it seems that most people fall into the 'shoes off inside rule'.

Regardless, I can't see us changing how we do things at home.
post #131 of 541
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

This issue is fascinating. Wasn't there a thread on it a couple years back that got out of hand?

Off of foot, you mean?
post #132 of 541
Do what you want. If I invite you over, I assume you're responsible enough to not fuck my home up and that you can comprehend whether your shoes are dirty or not.
post #133 of 541
I think as hosts it is important to make your guests feel as welcome as possible - and that graciousness puts the guest's comfort above the mere maintenance of 'things'.

But I also think there is a distinction between frequent guests who might be very close to you and occasional guests who are in your home only once for a large cocktail party or only occasionally for a dinner etc. etc.

In other words - if you have a no shoes policy in your home then I think it's fine to make it known to those who visit your home frequently. But conversely it's just rude in my mind to make infrequent guests abide by such rules. If whatever you have on your floors is so precious to you that you can't abide it taking a little dirt or a spill then either roll it up before you have the event or don't entertain people in your home.

I for one, find it a little off putting to be made to feel like the host's rugs are more important to them than I am.

I do respect that in some locales and cultures shoes off inside is the norm and in that case I'm in full support of it - as guests would have reason to expect to follow local customs.
post #134 of 541
And thirdly, the code is more what you'd call "guidelines" than actual rules...
post #135 of 541
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

Second, as someone else mentioned, this applies most to short visits and parties...you show up at someone's place before going to dinner and have to wait for them to get ready...who wants to untie and retie shoes for a 5 minute visit? If you are going to be lounging around on their couch for hours watching a movie, of course shoes come off for comfort.

In that case, I would keep the shoes on but not venture far inside the home. I wouldn't want a guest to have shoes on and walk around my living room or bedroom but it's ok to have shoes on and wait near the front door if we're going out in a few minutes.

It pretty much comes to common sense:
  • Take shoes off to keep the floor clean (this is also a mental thing - even if your shoes are not dirty, the idea that you've walked thru who knows what on the street is what makes people perceive them as dirty, thus it does not apply to other garments)
  • Take shoes off to make yourself more comfortable (who wants to wear shoes all day?). Sweaty feet should not be an issue, nobody is going around sniffing your feet and hopefully your diet and whatnot isn't something that causes your feet to smell like a garbage dump from further away.
  • Keep shoes on if you're going out the door in a moment.
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