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Houses with 'No Shoe' Rules - Page 8

post #106 of 541
^

biggrin.gif

I love this. Of course part of the love comes from the fact that I am too chicken shit to ever do that; well, the refusing verbally to take of my shoes part, I could never do the beating.
post #107 of 541
Quote:
Originally Posted by moddey View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

yeah, following scene is him removing a wire from his boots....

ok, this guy can keep them on right? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Reid
Edited by Master-Classter - 8/25/11 at 9:05pm
post #108 of 541
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asian Afro View Post

I don't know anyone who wears shoes around the house, so I'm not sure how some things would work.

1) When your alarm goes off in the morning, do you reach for your shoe horn?
2) Do you hang a shoe horn in the bathroom just so you can put on shoes straight out of the shower?
3) Would your shoes not go with your dressing gown or sleepwear? Do you wear slippers then? If so, why not wear slippers throughout the house?
4) Do you buy AEs as house beaters?

I'm only half serious.

Because you can do both slippers and shoes? I'm not sure what half is serious here.

I don't have any rules concerning footwear at home, except for no footwear in the bathroom(water+dirt) and take them off when they are really dirty. Other than that feel free to kick off your shoes(or not) whenever. Then again I'm not really a carpet person.
post #109 of 541
Quote:
Originally Posted by Master Squirrel View Post

This is a Midwestern and Middle Eastern tradition. Taking shoes off when entering a home in the Midwest is a sign of respect. I have new hardwood floors, I do not want them scratched. I have a huge mat to throw shoes and boots on.

I grew up with this rule and do not find it weird at all.

I live in the midwest and almost every house I have been to/visited has a rule of shoes off at the door. I had no idea this was not universal laugh.gif

It seems like older people follow this more strictly than younger people in my experience.
post #110 of 541
Hi all, I grew up where We took off our shoes when entering to someone's house (with out being asked) . We take off our shoes at the door where we have shoe stand behind the front door. So most people follow this. But I grew up in South east Asia. Here in Australia in my house I take off my shoes up to entering my house. But its up to the guests. I mean I appreciate when they take theirs off without being asked. I never ask them to take off their shoes. And when I go to someone’s house if they take off their shoes upon entering their house I do the same. I think its kind of respect.
Put it this way...... after the guest goes home the host has lot of plates and glass and food to clear and clean. If the carpet also dirty that’s put much more work on hosts.
****I hate handy man/ repair people they come to your house with dirty muddy boots and just jump on your house before you could even ask them to take off their shoes. In Australia repair people they refuse to take off their dirty shoes for the sake of their safety. And believe me their big boots dirty as funk and I think they step on dog poo before they enter your house. ****
post #111 of 541
Customs and traditions aside, why the fuck would you want to keep wearing your shoes after a long day's work????? One of the best feelings is getting out of your shoes upon return home......just like having a cold beer on a really hot day.

I grew up in a no-shoes-in-the-house environment...............I'm SO glad I did.

And for those who keep splitting hairs about whether the house gets dirty from wearing shoes - the answer is YES.
post #112 of 541
We are not talking about lounging around in your balmorals--at least I am not. It's more like if you knock at your friends door to meet up before dinner or something and you want to walk in but you can't because you have to take of your shoes.

I am usually in socks or loafers while indoors.
post #113 of 541
It's been said, but I don't think it can be said enough for those not in an area that has an actual winter. You will completely destroy carpeting and flooring in less than a decade if you walk around in a house with rock salt, sand, and dirty snow. And that practice just becomes habit the other 7-8 months of the year.
post #114 of 541
i love walking around barefoot.
post #115 of 541
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadcammer View Post

gentlemen, I'm not sure what the hell you all are walking through,.

500

I bet most of the people that find taking off their shoes strange are coming from warmer areas.

In a place with real winter you aren't worried about the germs. You're worried about the slush and road salt. If you're boots are warm you want to take them off to avoid sweating like a pig. If they're cold you want to take them off to warm up your feet. You take off your overcoat when entering a house? It's not different. Unless you're wearing overshoes you take off your shoes.
post #116 of 541
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadcammer View Post

while we are on the topic of weird house related behavior, here's a question:

What the hell is the deal with bathrobes? Who wears these things? And why? I can't think of any reason for this item. You get out of the shower, you dry off, you put clothes on...done.

You put clothes on in your own home? Talking about wierd.
post #117 of 541
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadcammer View Post

gentlemen, I'm not sure what the hell you all are walking through, but I have white and light tan carpets, and they need nothing more than regular vacuuming and some spot cleaning and I wear shoes on it every day.

Some of the things I walk through...

Snow...
500

...flood...
500

...and sandstorm...
500
...most houses here don't have carpet. However the prevailing custom is to remove shoes and boots upon entering a house.
post #118 of 541
I don't wear shoes in my house. When i visit anyone's home, after being greeted, I peek down at their feet. If they are wearing shoes, I keep mine one, fi they are not I take them off.
post #119 of 541
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadcammer View Post

while we are on the topic of weird house related behavior, here's a question:

What the hell is the deal with bathrobes? Who wears these things? And why? I can't think of any reason for this item. You get out of the shower, you dry off, you put clothes on...done.

No, what's weird is taking a pile of clothes into the bathroom, taking bedclothes (if any) off and showering, drying, putting on the clothes whilst in the bathroom, traipsing back to the bedroom with the pile of bedclothes in hand. What a palaver. I sleep naked anyway.

On the shoes-off thing, I'm happy to accept people of other cultures or nationalities doing it, but when someone of my culture and geography does it, it's almost inevitably turns out that they're bland, parochial fucks who you wouldn't want to spend time with anyway. I spit on their Kinkades.

Also, when someone "asks" you to take your shoes off, it's not a question, even if it's phrased as one. Especially if phrased in holier-than-thou language implying that they're better than you ("In /this/ house, we take our shoes off!"). It fucks up the guest-host relationship within five seconds of getting through the door. Nice.

I don't tell guests what to do in my house. If they treat it like shit, they don't come back. Unless they're funny or otherwise good value, in which case anything goes. The idea of explaining "house rules" to a guest is perhaps one of the tackiest things ever.
post #120 of 541
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post

I generally hate people who are so afraid of ruining things that they can't bear to use them. People who make you afraid to walk around in a house qualify as assholes, IMO. It's supposed to be a place to live in. If you can't relax there, what's the fucking point?

I'll remove shoes if you ask me to, but unless you're from an asian culture, I consider it a bit of a rude request. The way I was raised, you make an effort for guests- which means cleaning up, even if not to an absurd degree, and understanding that the house will need to be cleaned after any party. Expecting your home to stay pristine all of the time is moronic, and enforcing that on others is rude.

Cleaning is a fact of life. Germs aren't as horrible as you think they are. Come to terms with those, and your life will be much less stressful, and your guests will like you more.


This, almost to the letter.

 

Allthough, I always do it when asked. And might even offer when I see people walking around bare/sockfooted. Often this is declined. The idea though that my shoes are dirtier than my (our your) sweaty feet is a bit laughable to me.


Edited by CDFS - 8/26/11 at 3:46am
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