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Quick Resume Question [Too wordy?]

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I have a quick resume question regarding the inclusion of short papers, especially for recent undergrad.

I received some guidance from Joffrey, and this is the closest I can get to MLA format (I have used it plenty of times including in said papers so it is not so much as being inexperienced with the format).

Anyways, I'll just include my first half of my resume -- Education:
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
EDUCATION
________________________________________________________________________________________________________
B.S., Business Administration; Concentration: Financial Economics
B.S., Statistics; Concentration: Quantitative Management

Honors
Graduated June 2011 Cum Laude with GPA of 3.5 on a 4.0 scale; Dean’s Honor List

Short Works
•“Design of Experiment: Let’s Shoot Hoops Free Throw Shots” (2011) (Applied quantitative analysis using DOE (design of experiment) in statistics to investigate factors that are significant and of influence to maximizing free throw shooting percentage).
•“CEO Project: Fortune 500 Company Analysis of Honda Motor Co. Ltd.” (2010) (Analyzed, compared, and developed competitive modern management strategies relevant to future growth and sustainability of Honda Motor Co., collaborative work).
•“Stock Portfolio Analysis” (2009) (Self-managed portfolio of ten stocks that mirrored the market development; monitored and analyzed daily market trends through Wall Street Journal articles).

Other
Generated and reported financial portfolio and data sheets including statistical analysis and forecasting using Microsoft Excel, Minitab, and SAS (Statistical Analysis Software)


This would be my education section and then I move onto my previous work positions. Btw, I double-majored so I just separated the two degrees as such.

Is this too wordy? I do not have anything else to add. And if it helps, I am looking to apply for managerial positions/district manager, so more emphasis may be in my prior work experience.

Thanks, shog[1].gif
post #2 of 12

I don't think it's too wordy. I think it's good.

post #3 of 12
Keep in mind that a lot of resumes are now screened for buzzwords by computer, so being wordy could be good. If the visual presentation is clean and easy to read, this text shouldn't be too bad.
post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks, I appreciate the response

I just want to make sure if someone is actually looking at the resume that it is easy for them to skim (sentences vs. bullet points)
post #5 of 12
Bullet points are good. Better for human eyes. If you have good/extensive work experience, lose the short works and use the space to expound on work achievements. As a hiring manager, I almost never look at that stuff unless I am hiring someone completely fresh from college
post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 
Prior work experience is other half of page (bullet point format)

The "short works" serves as a bit of a filler but also to elaborate a little more on my education background.

Thanks,
post #7 of 12
Depends what the employer is looking for. If he wants an academic, then you would express more.

If the employee is an asset manager, they would scruntinize •“Stock Portfolio Analysis” (2009) (Self-managed portfolio of ten stocks that mirrored the market development; monitored and analyzed daily market trends through Wall Street Journal articles).

It sounds like a joke, 10 stocks to "mirror market development", how much variance do the 10 stocks explain in your regression explain against the market?


Other
Generated and reported financial portfolio and data sheets including statistical analysis and forecasting using Microsoft Excel, Minitab, and SAS (Statistical Analysis Software)

might be good to indicate your proficency in each... it sounds like a data monkey
post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the heads up, probably intermediate at best. The 10 stocks could be worded better now that you brought it up, but it was 10 blue chip stocks if that makes any difference.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
• “Stock Portfolio Analysis” (2009) (Managed portfolio of ten blue chip stocks; monitored and analyzed respective key developments of each company through Wall Street Journal articles).

Other
Generated and analyzed financial portfolio and data sheets including statistical analysis and forecasting using Microsoft Excel, Minitab, and SAS (Statistical Analysis Software) (Intermediate skills in programs)

Again, probably could be more detailed especially with the programing skills but it may differ a little between each job.
Edited by gettoasty - 8/24/11 at 12:20pm
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by ginlimetonic View Post

Depends what the employer is looking for. If he wants an academic, then you would express more.

If the employee is an asset manager, they would scruntinize •“Stock Portfolio Analysis” (2009) (Self-managed portfolio of ten stocks that mirrored the market development; monitored and analyzed daily market trends through Wall Street Journal articles).

It sounds like a joke, 10 stocks to "mirror market development", how much variance do the 10 stocks explain in your regression explain against the market?


Other
Generated and reported financial portfolio and data sheets including statistical analysis and forecasting using Microsoft Excel, Minitab, and SAS (Statistical Analysis Software)

might be good to indicate your proficency in each... it sounds like a data monkey

Basically you created an index right? Maybe you want to word it in investment manager parlance. Comment is right, that wording sounds a bit amateurish. And isn't self-managed redundant? You managed it. How about "Managed portfolio of stocks indexed to the market," or "indexed to the pharmaceutical industry." or whatever. More detail could be helpful here.

Just nitpicking, what I have seen of your resume looks superior to a lot of other entry level ones.
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
Yes sort of like an index. We had to choose 10 blue chip companies that represented their sector the best depending on their key developments as well as "Key Statistics" and charts (From Yahoo! finance or Reuters). We had to maximize our "gains" but the project/report emphasized more on how well we understood what those key statistics told us, and not just merely understanding the numbers, but by looking at key developments like executive decisions/current events, how does it all tie into each respective stock "movement". (I know there are 2 terms for the different analysis, forgot shog[1].gif)
post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 
Didn't want to start a new thread and it has some relations to a resume, I was wondering how important and who has been doing so currently, adding a cover letter to your resume? Especially when job applications take place online.

Current place I am looking at gives you the option to upload other documents before attaching a resume.

I know writing a nice cover letter will basically help better my chances, j/w who else has been writing multiple cover letters.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
i just want to upload my resume and answer their questions online, and be done with it. ugh. i feel my chances are pretty good, and the job posting has been up for awhile. several exec. management positions for the same company.
post #12 of 12
Cover letters are good to provide context you can't provide in your resume. IT's your opportunity to tie you background and experience to the specific opening your applying for. It shouldn't be long though as hiring managers/hr will only skim it or read it closely once you've gotten through the first batch of 100s of resumes they have to review. IT can't hurt if you can keep it to 150 words or less. I used to do them but haven't during my most recent round of job searching.
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