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Does "Made in Italy" matter anymore? - Page 3

post #31 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpooPoker View Post

If cashmere pills, it is because of poor yarn quality, not the actual construction of the garment.
I bought a similar RLPL sweater and find myself wondering if the RL folks specified the yarn ... or if the factory (in China) had more to do with that ... or if the factory substituted something other than what was specified.

As of this point, a Goodwill has my RLPL sweater with lots of pilling.

__

As for 'Made in Italy' ... according to Dana Thomas, the author of Delux, all that is required for a piece to be 'Made in Italy' is that one facet of construction must be accomplished in Italy. In some instances, this one 'facet' was nothing more than attaching the 'Made in Italy' label itself.
post #32 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by RSS View Post

I bought a similar RLPL sweater and find myself wondering if the RL folks specified the yarn ... or if the factory (in China) had more to do with that ... or if the factory substituted something other than what was specified.

My guess is that if the price was really $995, someone at their design team said "We need to make a cashmere sweater that comes in at just under $1K. Source what you need to do to get us there."
post #33 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpooPoker View Post


You are definitely made to XXX standards, thats for sure.

lol8[1].gif

shog[1].gif

wink.gif

fistbump.gif

did you at least read the serious part of my post. once in a while i am a tad serious. its rare but it does happen here and there. smile.gif
post #34 of 66
true Stitch, so true smile.gif
post #35 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpooPoker View Post


My guess is that if the price was really $995, someone at their design team said "We need to make a cashmere sweater that comes in at just under $1K. Source what you need to do to get us there."
I don't really recall the price on my sweater ... but that's neither here nor there ... as you could say the same thing about $1500. In any event, if you are correct I blame Ralph ... not Mr. Lifshitz personally mind you ... but the business.

But damn that sweater -- in dark olive green -- looked wonderful off the shelf. That look certainly didn't last long.
Edited by RSS - 8/22/11 at 9:18pm
post #36 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post


you can call me out by name bro its ok, ive heard far worse.

Naw what the heck - I can tell you are a good guy smile.gif. I was generalizing in my imagination the concept of being detracted about the made in Switzerland - I already assumed with you it was no big deal. But to some it is a big deal. Peace out icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
post #37 of 66
Do Italians even work in Italian factories? I thought it was all immigrant labor anyways.

Also, manufacturing clothes is a skill that is transferable not genetic. You can teach a Chinese laborer how to sew to a certain standard just as well as an Italian. Didn't anyone see Gomorra?
post #38 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klobber View Post

Oh what the heck, I have plenty of made in Italy stuff that I would not necessarily place above "made in some other country". It is all bullshit... Look beyond the country and more towards whom manufactures/tailors the clothing.

To equate made in Italy with excellence is an abuse of common sense - a whole heap of crap is also made there. Just enjoy your clothes and to fuck where they are made from. That some of British and Italian tailoring is high end / high class cant be denied, but we dont live in the 1700's anymore where the colonials must bow their heads to an englishman.

If you have an eye for quality and/or style, you will surely find the pieces that make your wardrobe complete, irrespective of where the item was manufactured. Rant over, apologies for my abuse of the english language, and peace and love to you all happy.gif

+1 Said with gusto. Nice Klobber.

I thought the anti 'made in China, etc' sentiments were as much about standing against the out-sourcing to third world sweatshops as it was to potentially comprimised quality, no?
Damn....I just checked the label on my Zegna shorts...Made in Hong Kong....what the hell?
post #39 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr.orange View Post

true Stitch, so true smile.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klobber View Post


Naw what the heck - I can tell you are a good guy smile.gif. I was generalizing in my imagination the concept of being detracted about the made in Switzerland - I already assumed with you it was no big deal. But to some it is a big deal. Peace out icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

cheers.gif to the both of ya biggrin.gif
post #40 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by othertravel View Post

With Armani, Boss, Paul Smith, Burberry and even mainline Zegna suits not being made in Italy anymore, does a suit's country of origin matter as much as construction? That is, would you be willing to pay an extra $100-200 for a suit because it was made in Italy over Spain or Turkey?

What do you guys think?

BMW and Mercedes make cars in the US. Does that mean a Ford Edsel is a good car?
post #41 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by RSS View Post

I bought a similar RLPL sweater and find myself wondering if the RL folks specified the yarn ... or if the factory (in China) had more to do with that ... or if the factory substituted something other than what was specified.

.

Doesn't matter if it was the factory or RL. The name on the front is RL. The people with the rep on the line is RL. The people who need to make sure the QC is up to standard is RL.

It's no different then those toys a few years back. The large toy company tried blaming the factory. The factory may have been crap but they were picked by the toy company. The product was sold by the toy company. The buyer only saw the toy company's name .


Or imagine going to dinner and getting sick. Do you blame the cook? Or do you blame the owner that hired the cook?
post #42 of 66
Just ask your girl friend/wife/SO if they want a handbag from Italy or China or Turkey.
post #43 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by RSS View Post

As for 'Made in Italy' ... according to Dana Thomas, the author of Delux, all that is required for a piece to be 'Made in Italy' is that one facet of construction must be accomplished in Italy. In some instances, this one 'facet' was nothing more than attaching the 'Made in Italy' label itself.

For many years Moleskine journals were made in China but they were shipped to Italy to be shrink wrapped so that they could have the "made in Italy" label. The word got out and eventually they said, " made in China" but also said Designed in Italy
post #44 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by RSS View Post

As for 'Made in Italy' ... according to Dana Thomas, the author of Delux, all that is required for a piece to be 'Made in Italy' is that one facet of construction must be accomplished in Italy. In some instances, this one 'facet' was nothing more than attaching the 'Made in Italy' label itself.

For many years Moleskine journals were made in China but they were shipped to Italy to be shrink wrapped so that they could have the "made in Italy". The word got out and eventually they said, " made in China" but also said Designed in Italy
post #45 of 66
Spoo has me confused with Labelking. Is that a good thing or a bad thing?

Anyways, the quoted comment was part of a post about a report published in 1916 by the U.S. Department of Commerce which might surprise a few people but put some long-term perspective on things. The modern method of manufacturing clothing, i.e., by splitting the process into minute operations and by doing time studies and mechanization originated in the United States and later spread to the rest of the world.

Read this and think for a bit,

"The imports of clothing into the United States are almost negligible and are generally English overcoats, novelty garments like the Balmacaan, and golfing and motoring clothes. No sack suits are imported.
...

English ready-made clothing is not comparable with the American. The English hand tailoring is poor, except in the finest custom work. Very conservative styles of men's clothing are worn in England; the models do not change from one season to another as they do in this country. High-salaried designers [ahem] are employed by the larger clothing factories in the United States, who are constantly introducing attractive styles.
...

American people believe not only that the styles of clothing for men that are originated in the United States are superior to those that come from other countries, but also that the workmanship of the domestic product is superior to the workmanship on ready-made clothing produced in foreign countries. This belief accounts, in a measure, for the tremendous increase in the production of factory-made clothing in the United States during the last 20 years.

While the manufacture of ready-made clothing is one of the large industries in the United States, this industry is of comparatively small importance in other countries. The completeness of the factory equipment, the thoroughness of the factory organization, and the efficiency of the working force, which are noticeable in many establishments for making men's clothing in this country, are not even approached in other countries. Nearly all the ready-made clothing manufactured in Europe is of low-grade, cheap varieties, and is almost invariably manufactured in small factories, in shops, or in the homes of the workers."
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