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What 5 items must every stylish man have? - Page 5

post #61 of 118
Quote:
a gentleman does not smoke, a cowboy do.
Seconded.
post #62 of 118
I'd say: 1- a classic timepiece that can be handed down to future generations 2- a comfortable, beautiful classic pair of shoes, kept well polished. 3- A very well cut suit. 4- A cologne that you are fond of, and that can be smelled only by the woman laying on your chest in bed. 5- A classic pair of sunglasses that fit your face like a glove. IlVangelo
post #63 of 118
I am with horace - a handkerchief and a lighter are both tools of the trade of a gentlman. a gentleman, like a boyscout, should be prepared. and there is no better way for a gentlman to end his day than with a nice cigar and brandy.
post #64 of 118
What a pleasantly unsnarky thread.  I believe that in order to be "stylish", which is what the thread title asks for, you need to first have some fundamentals before worrying about items to buy.  WHICH cashmere overcoat is vastly more important than simply a cashmere overcoat.  Believe me, whatever understanding of fundamentals I have, I earned them the hardway... 1.  Understand your body and age. It is incredibly difficult to separate from what you are from what you desire to be.  Are you a large man, who is ill-suited to very tighter, trimmer Italian clothes?  Are you approaching middle-age, so that tight jeans, light-weight Pumas and a t-shirt makes you look a bit pathetic?  Are you a college student who is threatening to look like a 40-something English prince, fusty before your time?  Know who you are and what you look like and work with it.  After that, you can start to really understand "fit".  Once you conquer these facts, you'll start understanding your style better and dressing appropriately in a way that makes others appreciate you and be more comfortable around you. 2.  Color.   Learning color palettes -- what goes, what clashes, etc. -- takes time.  Start slow.  Remember, black, white, tan, gray.  Build from that up to blue.  Don't get frantic and start buying up oranges and pinks and purples because they look cool.  Starting buying those colors after you understand if purple and yellow clash or match or when brown and black go together and you have a basic wardrobe of neutrals to use as a background for the color. 3.  Don't listen to your female partner too much. You shouldn't buy clothes because your girlfriend or wife tell you to.  Sure, listen to their opinion, but they should not be the start and end of the decision.  They're women and don't truly understand mens' clothing and the messages it sends to other men.  Next time you get that bad line "women can pick clothes for men because we know what looks good on you", offer to go to Victoria's Secret and pick out their wardrobe for work because you know what looks good on them.  What color sweater we wear to work may actually make a difference and, by and large, men know that.  Trust your [male] intuition. 4.  Quality and Simplicity. To paraphrase Proust, elegance is never far from simplicity.  Err to the simple rather than the complicated.  A $1000 simple outfit will generally be superior to the $1250 complicated outfit.  Try this -- put on a solid charcoal suit for $800 and a Prince of Whales plaid for $1000.  All things being equal, the former will be better.  Also err towards the high quality.  The old saying "buy the best you can afford and take care of it" is true.  When you must venture in the realm of complex, do it with high-quality, well-fitted garments. 5.  Patience. Acquiring the proper style often means NOT buying and looking far longer than you like.  Pass up a good buy that would be a compromise.  I recently returned an item I loved that was marked down from $5000 to $1500 because it didn't fit perfectly.  It broke my heart, but it was the right thing to do.  If I have to wait five years to buy something that would've fit better, that was the right decision because the item simply wouldn't have worked.  Don't compromise and get clothes that do not fit.
post #65 of 118
Mr. Magoo, excellent post
post #66 of 118
Quote:
Quote:
(Horace @ 10 Nov. 2004, 10:55)
Quote:
Originally Posted by wja,09 Nov. 2004, 2:51
The manager of Church's in Burlington Arcade told me that one can get a good first take on a gentleman by looking at his shoes, his watch, and his nails.  That leaves room for two other essential items...that's tough.  Certainly an outdoorsman would have a pair of MTM boots.  One thing left..I need more time to think.
Good point, on the first three from Burlington Arcade.  But as for the watch, should a gentleman really be concerned with time? So to sum up, as Ernest calls for: 1) haircut (I'll include other grooming here) 2) shoes 3) handkerchief 4) lighter 5) an outstanding bill from his tailor
I do not agree with you as : - watch is not for time but for style - a gentleman does not smoke, a cowboy do. At least if he makes this mistake, he do not invest more money in that stupid activity with a lighter. - what will do a gentleman with an hankerchief? - hair cut is not a good, we are talking about goods I guess - bill? I think having a great suit is important but not  the bill. If I had to sum up for the all forum I would say for the moment = 1) watch 2) shoes 3) suit After?
Mon cher Ernest, given the vagaries of the fairer sex, a gentleman never knows when he'll be called upon to light a cigarette or offer a handkerchief, in addition to his shoulder, for them to cry on. Also, that Burlington Arcade quip: used to be true, but any bounder can have clean nails, polished shoes, and a nice watch. But I suppose it depends upon the definition of the gentleman, n'est pas?
post #67 of 118
Quote:
What a pleasantly unsnarky thread.  I believe that in order to be "stylish", which is what the thread title asks for, you need to first have some fundamentals before worrying about items to buy.  WHICH cashmere overcoat is vastly more important than simply a cashmere overcoat.  Believe me, whatever understanding of fundamentals I have, I earned them the hardway... 1.  Understand your body and age. It is incredibly difficult to separate from what you are from what you desire to be.  Are you a large man, who is ill-suited to very tighter, trimmer Italian clothes?  Are you approaching middle-age, so that tight jeans, light-weight Pumas and a t-shirt makes you look a bit pathetic?  Are you a college student who is threatening to look like a 40-something English prince, fusty before your time?  Know who you are and what you look like and work with it.  After that, you can start to really understand "fit".  Once you conquer these facts, you'll start understanding your style better and dressing appropriately in a way that makes others appreciate you and be more comfortable around you. 2.  Color.   Learning color palettes -- what goes, what clashes, etc. -- takes time.  Start slow.  Remember, black, white, tan, gray.  Build from that up to blue.  Don't get frantic and start buying up oranges and pinks and purples because they look cool.  Starting buying those colors after you understand if purple and yellow clash or match or when brown and black go together and you have a basic wardrobe of neutrals to use as a background for the color. 3.  Don't listen to your female partner too much. You shouldn't buy clothes because your girlfriend or wife tell you to.  Sure, listen to their opinion, but they should not be the start and end of the decision.  They're women and don't truly understand mens' clothing and the messages it sends to other men.  Next time you get that bad line "women can pick clothes for men because we know what looks good on you", offer to go to Victoria's Secret and pick out their wardrobe for work because you know what looks good on them.  What color sweater we wear to work may actually make a difference and, by and large, men know that.  Trust your [male] intuition. 4.  Quality and Simplicity. To paraphrase Proust, elegance is never far from simplicity.  Err to the simple rather than the complicated.  A $1000 simple outfit will generally be superior to the $1250 complicated outfit.  Try this -- put on a solid charcoal suit for $800 and a Prince of Whales plaid for $1000.  All things being equal, the former will be better.  Also err towards the high quality.  The old saying "buy the best you can afford and take care of it" is true.  When you must venture in the realm of complex, do it with high-quality, well-fitted garments. 5.  Patience. Acquiring the proper style often means NOT buying and looking far longer than you like.  Pass up a good buy that would be a compromise.  I recently returned an item I loved that was marked down from $5000 to $1500 because it didn't fit perfectly.  It broke my heart, but it was the right thing to do.  If I have to wait five years to buy something that would've fit better, that was the right decision because the item simply wouldn't have worked.  Don't compromise and get clothes that do not fit.
Excellent
post #68 of 118
Quote:
- a gentleman does not smoke, a cowboy do. At least if he makes this mistake, he do not invest more money in that stupid activity with a lighter.
Given that we had gentleman smoking before cowboys even existed I'd say you have it backwards, responds a gentleman and a smoker with a nice lighter and cigarette case.
post #69 of 118
Many gentlemen have smoked. Such as why Dunhill still creates their lighters, and Cartier their cigarette cases.
post #70 of 118
1. Attitude. He should never raise the voice, but yet his voice should be low enough to penetrate through the walls. He should know when to speak, and what to speak of. He should be educated, traveled, and have ideas and opinions of his own. He should have distinctive taste and high values. He should have a classy lady at his arm, somebody similar to him in education, travelings, values and taste. (for example, you can't have a hooker dressed like a lady, no matter how many times you've watched "Pretty Woman") 2. Shirts with good fit. I see so many people with shirts way too baggy, it's like they are swimming in them. Also, take good care of your shirts. It shows. 3. A slim wallet, made of high grade leather. It's pathetic when people reach for their wallet and it's a whale... it reminds me of George from Seinfeld. 4. Good shoes. High quality should be obvious. They should have leather soles. 5. Good sports jacket, or suit, preferably tailored. 6. Distinctive cologne. Not the young-ish type, or unisex, but rather a very masculine one. 7. A cardigan. 8. (bonus) If a smoker, no cigarette case and a beautiful but understated lighter. I feel it's also about what he doesn't have, or doesn't have to have, not only about what he has. 1. Sunglasses, baseball hats, etc, especially when indoors. 2. The only acceptable piece of jewelry for men is the watch. The watch stands for tradition. Basically the watch is the only way for men to express themselves with more than clothes. 50 years ago there were many watches with very different movements, and embodying the watchmaker's experience and personal touch. However, today, probably because of globalization most watches have movements bought from the same company. Because of the hyping up for many many decades, the watch became a status symbol. This is the reason why a watch can cost so much. You're paying for the label. This being said, I feel like one does not necessarily have to have a watch. But, if he does choose to wear a watch, it has to be a mechanical watch with a leather belt, a watch made by an old manufacturer, and never labels like Prada, Gucci, etc. Also, the watch should have a reasonable size, and not bring attention to itself. (like all those big gold watches that pimps are wearing -- not that I know any pimps) --trajan
post #71 of 118
1) investing in a well tailored suit
2) a nice watch
3) great pair of jeans
4) blackberry/smartphone
5) black leather jacket
post #72 of 118
a pair of dashing Lobbs in museum brown
a pair of highly ornate Italianate Santoni handmades in an antique decadent brown
a pair of formally elegant Vass captoe Us in a dark brown or reddish brown
a pair of luxurious socks to go with the shoes and pants you wear
a 44mm premium automatic watch in stainless steel.
post #73 of 118
Lazarus, is that you? It's like visiting old friends.
post #74 of 118
The ability to read calendar dates?
Quote:
November 12th, 2004 09:30 PM
LabelKing \tMany gentlemen have smoked.

Such as why Dunhill still creates their lighters, and Cartier their cigarette cases.
post #75 of 118
also a stylish man seems to go hand in hand with good character:

patience (just because the guy in front of you hesitated for 3 seconds doesnt mean you have to honk and swerve around him like a maniac; just be cool, you can wait for the next light , no?)

humble (whatever easily you receive can be easily taken away, remember that, this is LIFE)

confidence (that carries alot in even wearing shoddy clothes)

ability to make others feel comfortable and fun (you dont have to be the life of the party or even clever or witty, as long as others get to know you are a warm person and they enjoy being around you)

so many other things i can say....
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