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Any College Professors here? - Page 4

post #46 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klobber View Post

If you are after a good profile to be able to work at any university, you will have much publishing to do and networking to help with those citations (which are becoming as important as number of publications). Since you will be networking and attending conferences, you will want some decent shirts, shoes, and suits for these events. As for everyday attire when teaching, go with smart chinos, button down collar, no tie, and perhaps a sportcoat. On all other days, particularly when involved with PhD students or MA/MS students, dress as you please. Even for teaching dress as you please, although I always prefer to be well dressed when giving a lesson.

The citation thing is a loads of bollocks. Can't distinguish between important contribution and cites along the lines of 'Klobber and Oleg (2011) are clearly talking utter gobshyte when they claim...'. To highlight this, my sociologist wife has pointed out that New Labour windbag Anthony Giddens is now more cited than Max Weber. The case for the prosecution rests...
post #47 of 75
Good point. Dress well and teach them a lesson! icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klobber View Post

I always prefer to be well dressed when giving a lesson.
post #48 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcbarret View Post


I think this is a great summary of some of the excellent points made in this thread. You want to look good without it being too conspicuous. I noticed, for instance, that when I seriously upgraded my shoe selection, people noticed and approved without finding it weird (which they would've if I had, say, started wearing suits every day). I certainly don't agree with lanbexx's assertions that how you dress doesn't matter at all for success. While obviously doing good research (and depending on where you are, teaching well) are the most important things, I think people (either consciously or unconsciously) appreciate it when someone puts effort into how they look.

As for specifics, I find the range of comments in this thread really interesting. My field (genomics) ranges from shorts & tevas to sport coat every day. While generally everyone agrees that the profs in the first category look like douchebags, nobody wears a suit, not even at big international meetings. A few decent sport coats go a long way without looking out of place, and I find adding a tie from time to time can work extremely well in the right circumstances.

Not to be too much of a contrarian (and certainly, not trying to say that I would like to promote dressing poorly), but lanbexx's point, in my experience, rings true. I'll grant you that he made his point in a slightly rude and overly combative way (but perhaps he's one of those poorly socialised academics who has a hard time saying please and thank you?? rolleyes.gif). I have had any number of friends/colleagues promoted to senior lecturer, reader or chair (in the UK system) or associate prof or full professor (in the US system) who dress "poorly". One of my colleagues at UC Berkeley wore shorts and hiking boots every single day of the week. He happily proceeded up the academic hierarchy, and later in his career, was head-hunted for the directorship of an institute at ETH Zurich. I have friends/colleagues who were promoted to department head and dean positions, all the while wandering the hallowed halls in tevas and jeans. Perhaps the only time that I saw them wearing coat and tie was during official university functions, interview panels, etc. I even know a Nobel laureate who wears crocs and t-shirt as a matter of course, except perhaps when he's in the lab and then actually puts on a pair of closed-toe shoes for health & safety reasons. As I said earlier, there are so many quirky and "special" people in academia that making dress sense a criteria for evaluation (whether for official purposes, such as promotions, etc. or non-official judgements) just isn't feasible or wise. I honestly don't think other academics give dress sense much weight. While I haven't sat on promotions panels, I've sat on enough hiring committees and been involved in enough cross-university panels to know that "dress sense" has never once been broached at meetings, whether in the on-record or off-record comments.
post #49 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by borderline View Post

...Sport coat with Tie: Rarely, but in some settings (see above) could be very common, but always for important meetings with administration. Probably very often if you are a department head...
This was for 36 years (and would be now if I were still in full-time work) my daily work-day wear - I was a department head.
Apart from some winter days when I might wear a roll-neck pullover (turtle-neck sweater) under the sports jacket, I would ALWAYS wear a tie and, indeed, without one, I feel unfinished, even sloppy. And if some would say "that looks uptight", I don't care - surely it's better to be seen to take serious things seriously.
post #50 of 75
hey, it's academia - eccentricity is the norm, so pretty much anything goes, tho prob wouldn't hurt to dress somewhat similar to your Head of Department - or if u r H/D then like the VC - if u care most about advancement
post #51 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pliny View Post

hey, it's academia - eccentricity is the norm, so pretty much anything goes, tho prob wouldn't hurt to dress somewhat similar to your Head of Department - or if u r H/D then like the VC - if u care most about advancement

...But do you really want advancement into administrative posts? dozingoff.gif Some heads of department/heads of school are loved and others reviled. Most are viewed with some suspicion, because they might actually try and add more hours to your already 50-70 hour long work week with more admin or committee work. Everyone that I know who is/was a HoD or HoS would prefer to pass on the poison chalice to someone else...
post #52 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by academe View Post


...But do you really want advancement into administrative posts? dozingoff.gif Some heads of department/heads of school are loved and others reviled. Most are viewed with some suspicion, because they might actually try and add more hours to your already 50-70 hour long work week with more admin or committee work. Everyone that I know who is/was a HoD or HoS would prefer to pass on the poison chalice to someone else...

they referees, and referees are key to winning jobs
post #53 of 75
Necktie person here. Nice shoes. Usually not a sport coat, but not infrequently. (Perhaps this will elicit the howls about the mall salesperson uniform.) That puts me a couple of notches up the ladder of formality over my colleagues, including a couple of deans. Can't say that it helps or hurts. I dress this way because I like to do so.

But I've noticed that the administrative staff people often comment appreciatively, and I don't think it's insincere. In fact, I think they get a slight lift out of seeing a faculty male dressing a bit carefully (roughly as carefully as most of the faculty women); I think they construe it as a sign of respect for the enterprise in which they're involved. So, in addition to pleasing myself by the way I dress, I seem (more or less inadvertently) to be doing something to make the work environment a little more satisfying for those who do a lot of the grunt work to keep the place going. Of course, I could simply be flattering myself in this.
post #54 of 75
Recruiter here (like cults, I prey on midlife crises) . I like dressing the part: saddle shoes and tweed are regular part of my rotation. Though I am at a major research university, my subcampus is a quiet, laid back, ivy covered, cow shit smelling... er you get the picture. I get compliments daily -- even from undergrads (fashion design is on my campus). This is also noticed by the administrators and thus I do get occasional invites to more visible functions.
post #55 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by academe View Post

...But do you really want advancement into administrative posts? dozingoff.gif Some heads of department/heads of school are loved and others reviled. Most are viewed with some suspicion, because they might actually try and add more hours to your already 50-70 hour long work week with more admin or committee work. Everyone that I know who is/was a HoD or HoS would prefer to pass on the poison chalice to someone else...
I was a HoD but admin was only a minor part of my work - I had a full teaching load, and if one of my colleagues were away and I was free I would teach their class - I could not bring myself to take more money and less worktime simultaneously.
Quote:
Originally Posted by EngProf 
Necktie person here... Usually not a sport coat, but not infrequently. (Perhaps this will elicit the howls about the mall salesperson uniform.)...Can't say that it helps or hurts. I dress this way because I like to do so.
Good to find another! As I'd leave the jacket behind in hot weather and have insisted this is acceptable, I've had the "howls about the mall salesperson" on this and other fora, but never in real life.
post #56 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oleg View Post


The citation thing is a loads of bollocks. Can't distinguish between important contribution and cites along the lines of 'Klobber and Oleg (2011) are clearly talking utter gobshyte when they claim...'. To highlight this, my sociologist wife has pointed out that New Labour windbag Anthony Giddens is now more cited than Max Weber. The case for the prosecution rests...

I agree with this. Citations are a poor indicator because as we would both know, many PhD students only have a few key papers they reference but when they publish their thesis or journal / conference papers they need to bulk out their bibliography a bit. Many then pick out some filler references at random (what bubbles to the top of Google Scholar or Web of Science), or use someone else's bibliography as filler material without necessarily reading the papers, or perhaps at the behest of their supervising professor, pick certain papers for political reasons (external examiner, journal editor or conference chair in their research areas). Sad as it is, citations are considered by many in the academic community to be even more telling about a candidates qualities than sheer number of papers - usually the biggest champions of this, themselves, have a very high number of citations lol8[1].gif.
post #57 of 75
Don't overdress. Your peers will think you are putting form before substance. The senior faculty will think you are trying to compensate for a lack of productivity. In either case, if you are a whizz-kid (publish a lot and bring in a lot of money) you can do whatever you want (within certain broad limits) and they won't sack you. Just don't sleep with their wives or girlfriends!

Good luck.
post #58 of 75
I always appreciated when my professors 'dressed up' for teaching - after all, it's a profession and a lot of them were published authors - it said a lot to the students. However, the level of dress depends upon what area of academia you're working in...my bachelor degrees are a double-majors in English and Relgious Studies - I would expect the professors to be 'dressed' - suit 'n tie, SC 'n tie, nice shoes, etc.

When I worked on my MFA & MS in design, we were in arts, so it was more appropriate for the professor to wear a nice, clean shirt shirt and pants. 'Painting in oils' studio is not the place to wear anything but shirt/pants...Pottery was the place where 'mud' was being slung, so anything at all that resembled clean and dressy would be ruined in about 5 minutes. Starting the class clean was good enough.

Studying Landscape design was appropriate to wear a suit or SC 'n tie, as it was a classroom situation vs a studio. Our professor had been a professional who also had owned his own design business, so I always appreciated that he was 'dressed' to reflect that and it gave us something to aspire to, as well.

When I taught English, American History and Religious Studies I always wore a SC 'n tie...some days a tie. Then, after school day and in teaching Theatre Arts, wld drop the SC, the tie may stay on or off depending upon what the lesson - makeup class would lose it all, lecture on set design it would stay, etc.
post #59 of 75
post #60 of 75
Would any of the dept heads and other senior people care to comment how the clothes of a junior faculty member might impact the perception of him/her by others and how this affected advancement?
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