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Any One for a Scotch? - Page 210

post #3136 of 3327
You should also check out Ardbeg 10. Laphroaig 10, or Quarter Cask, too.
post #3137 of 3327
Just kopped this for a self Fathers Day gift, trying more of that Islay smoke flavor. My guy said this is very good, no longer being made and that I'd enjoy the taste.

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post #3138 of 3327
oooh. frown.gif i've always wanted to try it but it's kinda expensive for a 10 year. i didn't know there was still any available in nyc

cheers to your dad!
post #3139 of 3327
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

You should also check out Ardbeg 10. Laphroaig 10, or Quarter Cask, too.

Will do thanks. I think I'll try the Laphroaig 10 next. Might follow that with Ardbeg 10.

I'm finding I really like the peat/smoke flavors of the Islay malts.
post #3140 of 3327
Quote:
Originally Posted by EZETHATSME View Post

Will do thanks. I think I'll try the Laphroaig 10 next. Might follow that with Ardbeg 10.

I'm finding I really like the peat/smoke flavors of the Islay malts.

Get the cask strength if it's available. More of everything, and you can always dilute it down to the usual proof if you want.

I'm a Laphroaig CS evangelist.
post #3141 of 3327
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gibonius View Post

Get the cask strength if it's available. More of everything, and you can always dilute it down to the usual proof if you want.

I'm a Laphroaig CS evangelist.

Preach it. Yeah the CS is available here at my local spot, so will give it a try. Thanks for the recommend.
post #3142 of 3327
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post

Just kopped this for a self Fathers Day gift, trying more of that Islay smoke flavor. My guy said this is very good, no longer being made and that I'd enjoy the taste.
  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
1402701699_zps792e708d.jpg

 

Well well . . . where'd you find that?  I thought it was all gone.  I'd love a bottle of that or of the Beast.

post #3143 of 3327
So if I'm not mistaken, Grouse makes up a fair portion of Walker. With that in mind, I've tried Famous Grouse and found it meh, not particularly bad, but nothing overly interesting either. Then there's Black Grouse, which I guess is their darker richer older version. I recently picked up a limited edition bottle called Black Grouse Alpha, on sale locally for $35 at which price I figured it was worth a shot. I found is surprisingly and easy drinker. Now I can't compare it to $70-80 single malts, that wouldn't be fair, but I had assumed I'd be getting something similar to say JW Black for $35 and I don't have a huge amount of experience so take this with a grain of peat, but basically yes, I had some again last night and came to the same conclusion as the first time I had this. It's got a bit of smoke with a quick clean finish, slightly sharp, and while not creating that wonderful experience of single malts, it's certainly a good basic drinker that I'd be fine with my newbie friends overpouring. In a blind test, I don't think it'd be that far off from Walker Black and at the price its really not too shabby. No need to rush out for it, and I wouldn't pay any more than the $30-35 mark, but there you are, a very basic review.

later into the night I tried a few others... now I don't think Irish whiskys get much air time here, and again this could just be my unrefined palate, but I've had Bushmills several times and it's really not that bad, especially for the price, and to me anyway, more importantly it's a different kind of flavor from most of the Scottish stuff I've been trying. If you're a Scotch person and are adventurous enough to want to try Rye, Bourbon, Canadian Whiskey, etc, then don't be shy to test out a few Irish Whiskys. Look they're no single malts, but they have their place. I think I'll get some Bushmills next time I see it, just for some variety's sake.

Memorable drink of the night (at a friends house no less) was a smoked Manhattan. Glass lined with bitters, then turned and placed over smoking woodchips for a few minutes, then poured in the Manhattan and ice and cherry. Opening is sweetness, then alcohol kick, and long into the finish that smoked wood taste. Not a complicated variation but certainly a nice one.

Then I mixed myself a hodge-podge nightcap, a random idea from random bottles that needed to be finished. I mixed chocolate bitters and creme de cassis, grand marnier, goldschlager, and a dash of vanilla extract. Shook with ice and milk. The theory was a chocolate orange drink with cinnamon and vanilla hints. proportions were off but the general idea was there. Came out too bitter and the milk wasn't thick enough to smoothen it out so in future I would have skipped the chocolate bitters since there was already creme cassis, added more goldschlager, and used a bit of cream or even frothed it some like in a brandy Alex.
post #3144 of 3327
I'm pretty sure grouse isn't in johnnie walker. Johnnie walker isn't made of other blended whiskies for one. Two johnnie walker is diageo while grouse is edrington

before you go buy bushmills is recommend trying some redbreast especially the cask strength if you see it

Also instead of just whipping together random liquor bottles IMO the best way to learn new cocktails is riffing on classics, understanding proportions, and understanding what each ingredient is used for. Like grand marnier and creme de cassis are typically used as sweeteners so they're kind of at odds in the same drink. One way you could do it is making a brandy sour with less grand marnier as the sweetener and with the cassis as a float and leave out the goldshlager (kind of like a New York sour)

There's only three liquids (four if you count water) in an Alexander and I don't think any of your near empty bottles would go well in one not even the chocolate bitter
Edited by indesertum - 6/14/14 at 8:39am
post #3145 of 3327
Bushmill's 21 is pretty good. Three casks: Olorosso, bourbon, and Madeira. Pretty nice depth (esp. for an Irish) and rich. It could use a higher proof but I think that about everything that isn't cask strength already.
post #3146 of 3327
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post

I'm pretty sure grouse isn't in johnnie walker. Johnnie walker isn't made of other blended whiskies for one. Two johnnie walker is diageo while grouse is edrington

before you go buy bushmills is recommend trying some redbreast especially the cask strength if you see it

Also instead of just whipping together random liquor bottles IMO the best way to learn new cocktails is riffing on classics, understanding proportions, and understanding what each ingredient is used for. Like grand marnier and creme de cassis are typically used as sweeteners so they're kind of at odds in the same drink. One way you could do it is making a brandy sour with less grand marnier as the sweetener and with the cassis as a float and leave out the goldshlager (kind of like a New York sour)

There's only three liquids (four if you count water) in an Alexander and I don't think any of your near empty bottles would go well in one not even the chocolate bitter

yeah, like I said pretty new at this stuff shog[1].gif. Huh, I could have sworn Grouse was a major component of something or other. Or rather, isn't Walker a blend of other scotchs? maybe I've got to go way back to school on this hobby...

your advice re: classics makes total sense. Because there's so little liquid, proportions are pretty important. I'm used to cooking where a dash of this or that is usually ok to experiment with. Re: Alexander, maybe I'm still off but in my mind the basic idea of Alexander plus other flavors like orange or cinnamon wouldn't hurt.

ah, anyway, will go back to basics
post #3147 of 3327
Depends on the JW but they do blend single malts (with other single malts or grain whiskey in the case of black and red). Grouse is a blend from another company tho.

I think actually an alexander with a dash of goldshlager or grand marnier could work but not both and not with creme de cassis

Grouse has an 18 that is a blend of other single malts. Maybe you were thinking of that?
post #3148 of 3327
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post

Depends on the JW but they do blend single malts (with other single malts or grain whiskey in the case of black and red). Grouse is a blend from another company tho.

I think actually an alexander with a dash of goldshlager or grand marnier could work but not both and not with creme de cassis

Grouse has an 18 that is a blend of other single malts. Maybe you were thinking of that?

Grouse is a blend that includes MAcallan and Highliand Park (I'd guess black grouse has more MAcallan Sherried malt)
JW is a blend that (depending on which label) includes among many others,varying amounts of Talisker (maritime) Caol Ila (smoke) Cragganmore (speyside richmess)
post #3149 of 3327
My brother in law gifted me a Bunnahabhain 25 for having built them a dining table. We opened it last night and had a few glasses, then I had another at home with a Davidoff millennium. Wow, what a scotch. This is actually my second bottle of it, but I did not take more than one glass of the first, since I save it for special occasions. Seems like I need to change my policy on that one.
post #3150 of 3327
What's better than one bottle of aged scotch, two bottles... smile.gif

I also enjoy the Davidoff Millenniums, so cheers friend... cheers.gif
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