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Any One for a Scotch? - Page 180

post #2686 of 3327
I imagine scotch is different from batch to batch slightly. Cognac makers combat this by changing the blend to continuously reproduce the house style and I assume blended scotch producers do the same, but what can single malt producers do to reproduce their product with identical results?
post #2687 of 3327
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

I imagine scotch is different from batch to batch slightly. Cognac makers combat this by changing the blend to continuously reproduce the house style and I assume blended scotch producers do the same, but what can single malt producers do to reproduce their product with identical results?

To me the difference wasn't slight, but very noticeable...and noticeably different from the modern bottling because it was very similar to the older 80's bourbons I have tasted. I wish I was good enough at tasting to be able to get into the minute differences between the same malt...are you there yet SG?
post #2688 of 3327
I doubt it, I don't drink the same ones often enough. Another ten years maybe.
Edited by SkinnyGoomba - 1/20/14 at 7:27am
post #2689 of 3327
took this picture the other day, figured you guys would enjoy.


post #2690 of 3327
Crazy the booze inside can be bought for 35,000
http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/01/20/idUS65888982520140120
post #2691 of 3327
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewYorkIslander View Post

To me the difference wasn't slight, but very noticeable...and noticeably different from the modern bottling because it was very similar to the older 80's bourbons I have tasted. I wish I was good enough at tasting to be able to get into the minute differences between the same malt...are you there yet SG?

One of the biggest differences is the willingness to use much older stock to produce a higher quality release.
Historically, distilleries rarely released very old whisky (20+) but would use the casks to enhance their regular bottlings. As lder releases gained value that became extremely wasteful. Years ago it was very common to find 20+ yo barrels blended into a 15 yo statement release. Now those barrels are either held or put into a 21 year old release.
post #2692 of 3327
Another find yesterday:
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)



I'm dating it 1965.

As well as these:
IMG_7913_zpsbafadcbc.jpgWarning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
IMG_7914_zpscd7469b6.jpg
IMG_7915_zps902aed77.jpg
IMG_7916_zps3a36e8fc.jpg
mid 80's

IMG_7917_zpsb44305c6.jpgWarning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
IMG_7919_zps21d564ba.jpg
IMG_7918_zps0ace403b.jpg
IMG_7921_zpse0fd9528.jpg
mid 80's as well.

Anyone with any other info, would be appreciated.
Edited by NewYorkIslander - 1/21/14 at 3:32am
post #2693 of 3327

Jealous on the Lochnagar.

post #2694 of 3327
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman View Post

Jealous on the Lochnagar.
dittos
post #2695 of 3327
Quote:
Originally Posted by agoldf View Post

One of the biggest differences is the willingness to use much older stock to produce a higher quality release.
Historically, distilleries rarely released very old whisky (20+) but would use the casks to enhance their regular bottlings. As lder releases gained value that became extremely wasteful. Years ago it was very common to find 20+ yo barrels blended into a 15 yo statement release. Now those barrels are either held or put into a 21 year old release.

If you looked at Balvenie 15 dates you used to be able to find some massively older whiskys. I remember picking up a 26yo one once.
post #2696 of 3327
post #2697 of 3327
Anything gone aground recently?





Nice work, I'm green in one eye and blue in the other!
post #2698 of 3327

Tried the Hazelburn 8 tonight, it's ok with a nice sweet aftertaste, but it doesn't last very long. I think that this would be much better aged for a few more years. There is a 12 year that I think would be really good. Overall it was worth buying, but I don't think that I'll be buying another bottle.

post #2699 of 3327
I've recently gotten into scotch and am wondering if anyone has any tips on jump-starting my palate? I feel like I'm wasting the things I taste because I can't grasp more than a few of the flavor notes shared by the label and reviewers. I've only tried maybe 8-12 different ones, and I'm only able to distinguish between like/dislike at this point.
post #2700 of 3327
^
I'm a newbie as well. Best thing I did is to educate myself on whiskey tasting, putting me into a better position to enjoy and get more out of my whiskeys. I asked what whiskeys were good entry levels, and what different regions had to offer. Of course, sampling for me has been the hardest, but I am learning to pick up samples before I invest in a whole bottle that I might not like.
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