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Any One for a Scotch? - Page 139

post #2071 of 3272

Yeah, you should resurrect the Bourbon thread, then. The gap between Pappy and the others you cite is enormous. I love the Black Maple Hill Limited as my daily drinker, but many pan it and prefer Rowan. Eagle Rare 17 is also in Pappy territory.

 

~ H
 

post #2072 of 3272
Try the Hudson 4 grain...it's my fave of the Tuthilltown Spirits family...their single malt is also nice, very AMerican, bourbony.
post #2073 of 3272
Quote:
Originally Posted by sinnedk View Post

well since i cannot find any Pappy, i am trying to explore other bourbons... i've tried b&e, buffalo trace, bullet, those are all on the cheaper side of bourbon so i want a higher tier bottle now
It's tough to find Pappy anywhere.


If you don't want to jump straight from the bottles you listed to the $60-70 range: some other suggestions (in rough order of price) Evan Williams Single Barrel, Old Forester Birthday bourbon (not the regular edition), Four Roses Single barrel (excellent).

Really depends what you like. I like depth over smoothness, but that's me.
post #2074 of 3272
i prefer smooth personally, but if there is an in-depth at someones house i go with the flow?
post #2075 of 3272
I am looking to round out my regular scotches by balancing Ardbeg uigeadail with ... something else that would be its opposite.

My baseline, the center, is Glenlivet 25. That is staying put as the "control" in the middle.

But I also really like Ardbeg uigeadail ... or something equally as smokey and peaty, etc.

What would balance this out, on the other end ?

If I had to pick from what I've drunk in the past, I would say Glenmorangie Quinta Rubin... which is probably a good candidate, but I wonder what some others think ?

A graphic:

uigeadail < .....G. XXV ..... > WHAT ?


Thanks.
post #2076 of 3272

Glenlivet strikes me as closer to the opposite of the Ardbeg rather than a center for the range.

 

Leaving out secondary maturation, the classical definitions would place the Lowland malts as the mildest, everything that Ardbeg is not; Glenkinchie or Auchentoshan would be my picks to round out your range. A lighter Highland malt would also do, like Dalwhinnie.

 

~H

post #2077 of 3272
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman View Post

Glenlivet strikes me as closer to the opposite of the Ardbeg rather than a center for the range.

Leaving out secondary maturation, the classical definitions would place the Lowland malts as the mildest, everything that Ardbeg is not; Glenkinchie or Auchentoshan would be my picks to round out your range. A lighter Highland malt would also do, like Dalwhinnie.


Hmmm... I guess I'm thinking of glenlivet as somewhat plain or unadorned ... it's very, very good, of course, but it doesn't have that defining characteristic of smoke and peat that the Islay malts have.

So I'm looking for something that has something equally as defining and overpowering, but on the opposite end of the smoke and the peat ... I'm thinking of flavors like vanilla and apricot and cinnamon and so on ... but I'm open to other suggestions as well.

Thanks for your thoughts!
post #2078 of 3272
Would you consider Irish Whiskey, or does it need to be Scotch? Knappogue Castle 17 is very good, hints of dark chocolate...there's also Powers John's Lane Edition
post #2079 of 3272
Quote:
Originally Posted by djblisk View Post



Went to the same liqour store in Shibjuku

I'm staying at the Tokyo Park Hyatt in less than 3 weeks. Definitely spending time and money at that shop. Any suggestions? I'd like a Japanese malt (or two) I can't get or afford in the States, and a couple scotch whiskies. I favor the following: Lagavulin, Longrow, Talisker, Highland Park, Oban. Basically Islays and peaty/smoky others.
post #2080 of 3272
Quote:
Originally Posted by john_sf View Post

Hmmm... I guess I'm thinking of glenlivet as somewhat plain or unadorned ... it's very, very good, of course, but it doesn't have that defining characteristic of smoke and peat that the Islay malts have.

So I'm looking for something that has something equally as defining and overpowering, but on the opposite end of the smoke and the peat ... I'm thinking of flavors like vanilla and apricot and cinnamon and so on ... but I'm open to other suggestions as well.

Thanks for your thoughts!

 

Ok. I also think of Glenlivet as somewhat plain in the sense you mentioned, and also on the grassier side (which is lighter to me). It will be hard to find as....predominant a note in any spirit as is the smoke of an Islay; however, two of the most distinctive types of scotch to me is 1) Peaty Islays, and 2) heavy sherry. So the sherry is another way to go -- what is you opinion of Macallan, which is classically very sherried? Suggestions.

 

- Glenfarclas 21. Big time sherry bomb that has very forward sherry notes, which also are typical to a lot of Speyside whiskies.

- Glenmorangie Nectar d'Or: Reaching into secondary maturation, here, the Nectar was aged in Sauternes casks and is rendolent of pineapple, ripe apricot, vanilla and honey -- these are all really apparent notes, might be just what you are looking for. I just don't think of it as a very traditional whisky.

- Royal Lochnager or Mortlach for intensely warm, spicy, cakey whisky.

 

~ H

post #2081 of 3272
Stoked to have secured a bottle of Balvenie Rum Cask 17 year, can't wait to pick her up and get her gone.
post #2082 of 3272
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewYorkIslander View Post

Stoked to have secured a bottle of Balvenie Rum Cask 17 year, can't wait to pick her up and get her gone.

That is a good find these days.
post #2083 of 3272
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman View Post

Ok. I also think of Glenlivet as somewhat plain in the sense you mentioned, and also on the grassier side (which is lighter to me). It will be hard to find as....predominant a note in any spirit as is the smoke of an Islay; however, two of the most distinctive types of scotch to me is 1) Peaty Islays, and 2) heavy sherry. So the sherry is another way to go -- what is you opinion of Macallan, which is classically very sherried? Suggestions.

- Glenfarclas 21. Big time sherry bomb that has very forward sherry notes, which also are typical to a lot of Speyside whiskies.
- Glenmorangie Nectar d'Or: Reaching into secondary maturation, here, the Nectar was aged in Sauternes casks and is rendolent of pineapple, ripe apricot, vanilla and honey -- these are all really apparent notes, might be just what you are looking for. I just don't think of it as a very traditional whisky.
- Royal Lochnager or Mortlach for intensely warm, spicy, cakey whisky.

~ H

Thanks a lot. I think I will try the Nectar d'Or - I've been meaning to try it anyway...
post #2084 of 3272
xpost from recent purchases part2

post #2085 of 3272
Quote:
Originally Posted by sinnedk View Post

hey guys, bourbon question for all of you...

i was recommended by 2 good friends 2 diff bourbons, Noah's Mill and and Booker's Bourbon, both are in the 90s on points and both won gold medals...

anyone care to chime in which is better/smoother

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewYorkIslander View Post

Gnatty8 is the Bourbpn expert...he turned me on to a few. I like the Hudson Four Grain, but it's pricey at $50 for a 375ml. I've tried B&E which is good, Kings County which is good, and very smooth, and Col EH Taylor, which was all good.

I have yet to crack open my bottle of Pappy 20 year, but I fear I'll be disappointed. Not sure how much of the hype over this is its rarity rather than its taste.

Well thanks Rob, and although I've probably had a bottle of just about every bourbon out there, I would defintely not qualify myself as an expert by any means. I do not what I like though. Given the choice between those two, I'd probably go for the Noah's Mill 8 times out of 10. Since both are fairly high proof, I would not characterize them as smooth before I'd characterize them as flavorful, but then again, neither are harsh. Booker's has a very deep, smoky, rich flavor that I have heard characterized as "bacon fat." Although my palate is not nearly as sophisticated enough to render this opinion itself, I'd have to say that feels about right. Noah's Mill on ther other hand, is lighter, with more subtle flavors like maple sugar and believe it or not, peanuts. Yes, peanuts.

That said, if you're not sure; before you pony up for a bottle, find a good bar tended by a fine looking tattooed girl and try each by the glass. First sip neat, then add water to taste.

Rob, which Taylor did you have?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gibonius View Post

I've had the 15. It was the first premium tier bottle that I had, and I've gotten three more since. It is truly excellent, holds up to everything else that I've tried. I've only had the 20 by the glass and didn't think it was a huge step up, not enough to pa I honestly like the 15 more than the 23 15 more than the 23.

This. That said, I'd extend that to the 20 as well. I have about 5 bottles of the 20 YO sitting in my liquor cabinet (I live in the south, and like any good southerner, I always know how to find the best whiskey) right now. A month ago I had 6, but I traded one for a bottle of the 15 yo. True story. Like I said, I know what I like.
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