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Any One for a Scotch? - Page 130

post #1936 of 3034
Quote:
Originally Posted by cs09 View Post

Just found some Caol Ila 14 Unpeated 2012 release, if anyone wants details pm me, been looking all over for this and thought I'd share the wealth! satisfied.gif

I just picked up a Caol Ila 10 from a local distributer...looking fwd to cracking it open...
post #1937 of 3034
Quote:
Originally Posted by why View Post

I'm not a chemist but from what I do know I'd say Huntsman is right. Also, many 'science of alcohol' websites are psychobabble. I'm also willing to bet that flavors like iodine do in fact come from iodine itself as Gibonious suggested.

Huntsman makes a convincing case and I'd like to take it at face value...it is, after all, what I've believed for some years now.

But it re-raises the question--some peats won't have any appreciable iodine (kelp or salt water) in them, simply because of geography. So some heavily peated whiskys should be nearly free of any medicinal flavours while at the same time retaining the smokiness and the peat reek. [and at one point in time I suspect most if not all SM Scotches were dried and distilled over peat as it was the most common and readily available fuel in Scotland.]

So...are such whiskys available and which are they?
post #1938 of 3034

Well, that depends what you mean by 'heavily peated.' As I mentioned earlier in the thread, if you're going by the numbers, Highland Park has a higher ppm measurement than Bruichladdich or Bunnahabain, and shows smoke but no medicinal flavors (at least to my palate). That said, you can't call it a heavily peated whisky.

 

Bunnahabain is more distinctly peaty without the medicinal note, but it's still a very gentle peatiness. My best guess would be Longrow - the most heavily peated of Springbank's Campbelltown distilleries. I haven't had Longrow before, but I've seen it on the lists at my two usual Scotch bars, so I can give it a shot and report back.

 

Brora and Port Ellen are both reportedly more smoky than medicinal, but I haven't had either (and as they're both closed are getting scarcer by the day).

 

Finally, I'd say Talisker 10 yr old is pretty smoky without a strong iodine/medicinal note to it, but YMMV.

post #1939 of 3034
Quote:
Originally Posted by Longmorn View Post

Finally, I'd say Talisker 10 yr old is pretty smoky without a strong iodine/medicinal note to it, but YMMV.

Was also going to suggest this.
post #1940 of 3034
Quote:
Originally Posted by Longmorn View Post

Well, that depends what you mean by 'heavily peated.' As I mentioned earlier in the thread, if you're going by the numbers, Highland Park has a higher ppm measurement than Bruichladdich or Bunnahabain, and shows smoke but no medicinal flavors (at least to my palate). That said, you can't call it a heavily peated whisky.

Bunnahabain is more distinctly peaty without the medicinal note, but it's still a very gentle peatiness. My best guess would be Longrow - the most heavily peated of Springbank's Campbelltown distilleries. I haven't had Longrow before, but I've seen it on the lists at my two usual Scotch bars, so I can give it a shot and report back.

Brora and Port Ellen are both reportedly more smoky than medicinal, but I haven't had either (and as they're both closed are getting scarcer by the day).

Finally, I'd say Talisker 10 yr old is pretty smoky without a strong iodine/medicinal note to it, but YMMV.

Thank you. I have bought a few bottles of Talisker in my time and drank Bunnahabhain with my son in law. I like HP and like you have never tried the Longrow.

I'd call Talisker more peppery than medicinal. And I'll be interested in your take on the Longrow.
post #1941 of 3034
This day has been a frustrating bit of shite, so I think some more of the Lap quarter cask is in order.
post #1942 of 3034
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

I'd call Talisker more peppery than medicinal. 

 

I agree. Talisker 10 is about the limit of peat that I enjoy. It used to be Bowmore Darkest, but since they switched to a new formula a few years ago I find it across the line (much to my dismay).

 

I'll be sure to report back on the Longrow (probably not before Friday, though).

post #1943 of 3034
In the mean time...
post #1944 of 3034
why is all this shit constantly going up in price?
post #1945 of 3034
Quote:
Originally Posted by jet View Post

why is all this shit constantly going up in price?

Largely for the same reason cigars have gotten more expensive, the Far East.
post #1946 of 3034
Quote:
Originally Posted by ama View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by jet View Post

why is all this shit constantly going up in price?

Largely for the same reason cigars have gotten more expensive, the Far East.

Sucks.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jet View Post

why is all this shit constantly going up in price?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Longmorn View Post

In the mean time...

Nadurra is very decent. I actually use it in my version of the Pennicillin cocktail, which may be decadent, but it makes a difference.

Incidentally, my favorite distilleries, in order, are Mortlach, Royal Lochnagar, and Longmorn.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Longmorn View Post

Well, that depends what you mean by 'heavily peated.' As I mentioned earlier in the thread, if you're going by the numbers, Highland Park has a higher ppm measurement than Bruichladdich or Bunnahabain, and shows smoke but no medicinal flavors (at least to my palate). That said, you can't call it a heavily peated whisky.

 

Bunnahabain is more distinctly peaty without the medicinal note, but it's still a very gentle peatiness. My best guess would be Longrow - the most heavily peated of Springbank's Campbelltown distilleries. I haven't had Longrow before, but I've seen it on the lists at my two usual Scotch bars, so I can give it a shot and report back.

 

Brora and Port Ellen are both reportedly more smoky than medicinal, but I haven't had either (and as they're both closed are getting scarcer by the day).

 

Finally, I'd say Talisker 10 yr old is pretty smoky without a strong iodine/medicinal note to it, but YMMV.

 

I have some Port Ellen but I am going to need one damned fine reason to open it!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by why View Post

I'm not a chemist but from what I do know I'd say Huntsman is right. Also, many 'science of alcohol' websites are psychobabble. I'm also willing to bet that flavors like iodine do in fact come from iodine itself as Gibonious suggested.

I am no chemist, either, but I do work with several. Now, if either Gib or I could get our GC/MS, we'd sort that to rights.

 

~ H

post #1947 of 3034
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman View Post

Nadurra is very decent.

 

It is indeed, but the Nadurra Triumph 1991 (pictured here) is even better. Rounder, richer with deeper flavors. Worth the upgrade, but I wouldn't use it in a cocktail!

 

Mortlach is high on my list; Royal Lochnagar isn't on my radar (details?); and agreed on Longmorn - great stuff. Not as complete a package as HP 18, but still good stuff.

post #1948 of 3034
Quote:
Originally Posted by ama View Post

Largely for the same reason cigars have gotten more expensive, the Far East.

And wine. GD China. ffffuuuu.gif
post #1949 of 3034
Maybe also because there are a fair number of people in this world who are not prepared to act on their professed convictions.

"There's no worse curse than approval."~ James Lee Burke
post #1950 of 3034
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman View Post

Sucks.
I am no chemist, either, but I do work with several. Now, if either Gib or I could get our GC/MS, we'd sort that to rights.

~ H

There are probably five hundred of the things around here but people might look askew if I brought in scotch to sample.
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