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Any One for a Scotch? - Page 122

post #1816 of 3253
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

I had a Dalwhinnie 15 last night (the missus and I were celebrating our 39th wedding anniversary) [...]
Congratulations!
post #1817 of 3253
I guess I can agree that there is no 'right' way to enjoy whiskey... As long as it tastes good to you and you're kind of keeping the integrity of the whiskey (i.e. not pouring coke in it) you're fine. Drinking whiskey straight is still very difficult to me, but I have been able to drink Jameson on the rocks pretty easily the last week or so.

Of the 4 whiskies I've actually bought at least a fifth of for myself, I'd currently rank them Jameson>Maker's Mark>Jim Bean>Evan Williams. I had a Glenlivet 12 maybe 3 or so years ago so I don't really remember the taste. I think I'm going to work my way up to Scotch because I still can't discern the taste that much between each whiskey unless I'm doing a side-by-side test.
post #1818 of 3253
Well, you may never get next to Scotch, it's not for everyone. And what difference does it make? It's not a requirement for citizenship or admittance into the workforce. smile.gif

But FWIW, whiskey and whisky are two different things. check out this link....and pay particular attention to the paragraph in italics contributed by the editor of the Oxford English dictionary near the bottom of the article.

After all, this is Style Forum.
post #1819 of 3253
I do love Bourbons as well as my Scotch...probably why I tend to lean toward sweeter scotches. Hudson 4 grain is GREAT, I just picked up a bottle of Widow Jane's as well.
post #1820 of 3253
Tried Laphroaig 10 this past weekend.

What is that taste that I'm tasting in there? It's quite different from the other scotches that I've tried. Tasted kind of like a date and kind of medicinal.
post #1821 of 3253
Quote:
Originally Posted by poena View Post

Tried Laphroaig 10 this past weekend.

What is that taste that I'm tasting in there? It's quite different from the other scotches that I've tried. Tasted kind of like a date and kind of medicinal.

Laphroig is an Islay. Most Islays have their barley dried over burning peat, absorbing that "peat reek" and smoke flavor.

Many Scotches outside of Islay display peat and smoke notes to a degree, but the Islays are the standard-bearers for peat and smoke.

Personally, I love them, especially during the winter.
post #1822 of 3253
Quote:
Originally Posted by aravenel View Post

Laphroig is an Islay. Most Islays have their barley dried over burning peat, absorbing that "peat reek" and smoke flavor.

Many Scotches outside of Islay display peat and smoke notes to a degree, but the Islays are the standard-bearers for peat and smoke.

Personally, I love them, especially during the winter.

Well I have Lagavulin 16 at home and Bunnahaibhain 12 at home also and enjoy both. The Laphroig just had a slightly different flavor. Hard to pinpoint.

I'm still new to drinking scotch so pardon my questions!
post #1823 of 3253
Quote:
Originally Posted by poena View Post

Well I have Lagavulin 16 at home and Bunnahaibhain 12 at home also and enjoy both. The Laphroig just had a slightly different flavor. Hard to pinpoint.

I'm still new to drinking scotch so pardon my questions!


Making beer and making malt whisky share a common beginning--malted barley. To make Scotch barley must be "malted"--this entails moistening the barley so that it begins to sprout. There is an enzymatic process that is initiated by the sprouting that converts the starch in the barley to maltose. The sprouting process must be stopped before it goes too far, however and this means roasting and drying the malted barley over the malting floor and/or in peat fired kilns. That's a simplified version and the details maybe slightly different depending on the distillery and the fashions of the day.

Most of the distilleries in the islands dry their barley over peat fires. Some in the Highlands still do this, also and most in the Speyside and the Lowlands dry their barley over coke. (anthracite coal)

Every place, every island, has a little different vegetation. But while the peat in Scotland is mainly spagnum moss, there's woody materials such as heather in some locales, not so much in others. So the peat in these places differs and the flavours the smoke from the peat imparts is different...unique, actually. But peat is the traditional fuel and the standard by which all single malt Scotch is measured simply because Scotch is commonly regarded as having a smokey character...even if it doesn't have any.

Island malts can have as much as fifteen times the amount of peat reek (as expressed in parts per million of phenols) as Speyside or Lowland malts. Island malts also have the salt spray which permeates the peat and perhaps a bit of kelp worked in there as well. So you may get iodine and other medicinal flavours.

Ardbeg and Laphroig, in that order, are generally regarded the most heavily peated malts.

No pardon necessary...

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Edited by DWFII - 1/14/13 at 1:45pm
post #1824 of 3253
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Making beer and making malt whisky share a common beginning--malted barley. To make Scotch barley must be "malted"--this entails moistening the barley so that it begins to sprout. There is an enzymatic process that is initiated by the sprouting that converts the starch in the barley to maltose. The sprouting process must be stopped before it goes too far, however and this means roasting and drying the malted barley over the malting floor and/or in peat fired kilns. That's a simplified version and the details maybe slightly different depending on the distillery and the fashions of the day.

Most of the distilleries in the islands dry their barley over peat fires. Some in the Highlands still do this, also and most in the Speyside and the Lowlands dry their barley over coke. (anthracite coal)

Every place, every island, has a little different vegetation. But while the peat in Scotland is mainly spagnum moss, there's woody materials such as heather in some locales, not so much in others. So the peat in these places differs and the flavours the smoke from the peat imparts is different...unique, actually. But peat is the traditional fuel and the standard by which all single malt Scotch is measured simply because Scotch is commonly regarded as having a smokey character...even if it doesn't have any.

Island malts can have as much as fifteen times the amount of peat reek (as expressed in parts per million of phenols) as Speyside or Lowland malts. Island malts also have the salt spray which permeates the peat and perhaps a bit of kelp worked in there as well. So you may get iodine and other medicinal flavours.

Ardbeg and Laphroig, in that order, are generally regarded the most heavily peated malts.

No pardon necessary...
--

That fascinates me, the process, I mean. How someone thought of doing this is incredible and here I sit, hundreds of years later, on my couch enjoying a Scotch that some guy thought might workout by cooking and cooling some grain...and how tasty it is!

I tried a JURA this weekend, wasn't nuts about it, had a sort of aftertaste, much like Czech Plum Brandy (Slivovitz). Anyone else try the Jura?
post #1825 of 3253
I just bought some Chivas 12yr for $30, what should I have bought in that price range?
post #1826 of 3253
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewYorkIslander View Post

That fascinates me, the process, I mean. How someone thought of doing this is incredible and here I sit, hundreds of years later, on my couch enjoying a Scotch that some guy thought might workout by cooking and cooling some grain...and how tasty it is!

They're using the locally available materials, makes sense if you think about it. What's really interesting is how the application of local materials and local climates creates such different spirits across the world. Many of the early distillers in Kentucky were Scottish and brought whisk(e)y traditions with them, but Kentucky doesn't have peat and is a lot warmer. End result is a very different product from similar initial traditions.
post #1827 of 3253
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianVarick View Post

I just bought some Chivas 12yr for $30, what should I have bought in that price range?

There was a brief discussion about that around post 1655 in this thread. It's a tough region for scotch, not great value to be had there. You can find some decent drams at $40, and lots of good options at $50.

Honestly if you're going for the ~$30 ballpark, I'd explore bourbons before scotch. The $30 bourbons are going to be much better than the equivalent priced scotch, unless you just don't like bourbon. Might be heresy for this thread though...shog[1].gif
post #1828 of 3253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gibonius View Post

Honestly if you're going for the ~$30 ballpark, I'd explore bourbons before scotch. The $30 bourbons are going to be much better than the equivalent priced scotch, unless you just don't like bourbon. Might be heresy for this thread though...shog[1].gif
+1. Buffalo Trace is usually sub-$30 and is really nice! Lots of good $30-35 bourbons. Once you hit $40 you can get Highland Park, some of Compass Box's stuff, Johnny Black obviously, etc. At $50 you have plenty of options, including the Ardbeg 10 I'm drinking now. smile.gif
post #1829 of 3253
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianVarick View Post

I just bought some Chivas 12yr for $30, what should I have bought in that price range?

Here's a couple of links where you can buy some pretty good single malt Scotch whisky at or around $30.00...for 375ml bottles (half bottle). It will at least get you started.

http://www.wallywine.com/p-35509-macallan-12yr-single-malt-scotch-whisky-375ml-half-bottle.aspx

http://www.winefetch.com/websearch_results.html?varietal=Single+Malt+Scotch&size_map=375&r=all

PS...on edit...there are a number of places like this on the net just search for "375ml single malt scotch"

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Edited by DWFII - 1/15/13 at 10:09am
post #1830 of 3253
I appreciate the advice! I think I am going to stick with bourbon until I want to start spending $40 or $50 on scotch. I would like to start drinking single malts but I don't have much room in my budget for that:) What's a good starter Islay in the $40 range?
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